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Apparently, there's not much I can't do!

So I left off in November, 2014 with something that would eventually lead me to this forum. The transmission in my 2000 Silverado kicked the bucket. I had 3 options; pay someone to fix it, fix it myself, or get a new truck. I am very much a DIYer and I am fairly knowledgeable when it comes to working on cars. So I figured I can get all the info I need online for rebuilding my transmission.   I found a guy on YouTube that goes step by step rebuilding a 4L60E. I bought a rebuild kit and started taking the truck apart. It took me 2 weeks just to get the exhaust bolts off the manifolds, LOL! Once they gave up, it only took 3 days to remove the transfer case and finally the transmission. While watching his tear down video I followed his every step. Pausing and starting the video until I had it completely apart. "This is a piece of cake" I thought to myself. And it really was. The way he broke everything down into sections it made it so much easier. I thought it was going to be a hot mess of parts but it was like a big 3D puzzle!   So I found what broke (input carrier gear support bearing, in case you wanted to know ) and once the replacement came in I was able to start the rebuild. While I was waiting for the parts I was able to clean everything and get it organized so when it was time to start rebuilding that was all I had to do. Same process as before, but in reverse. Section by section, pausing and starting. Assembly lube and ATF all over. I would say all in all it took about 2 weeks to get it rebuilt. This included the parts store selling me the wrong torque converter and replacing the spark plugs and oil pressure sending unit. It was also Christmas time so my time in the shop was limited (not to mention cold).   Transmission installed, transfer case installed, exhaust installed, add ATF, turn the key and pray, LOL! No issues so far! I let it warm up and added the rest of the fluid (12qts total), and took it for a test drive. I was able to back out of the driveway, drove it down the side street in front of my house. 1st gear good. 2nd gear great. 3rd gear.... 3rd gear??? It was like there was no other gears. It wasn't slipping, it wasn't revving, it just wouldn't shift from 2nd to 3rd.   I took it back out and checked everything. I couldn't find anything wrong! I adjusted the 3-4 clutch pack and double checked all the clearances. Rebuilt the valve body and made sure I had all the check balls in the right places. Put everything back in and..... Same thing. I was heart-broken.   It was February by this time and REALLY cold. I was done. There was a guy at work that offered to buy it as is and I told him to come get it. He took it to a shop and they said I had the output shaft in too tight. Where the snap ring holds it in place is where the new part I had to order was. I guess it needed to be modified to work for my transmission. Oh well. I gave it all I had and I was only about $600 in. A rebuilt unit was $1600 and to get a shop to fix it would have been twice that. The truck was paid for and I had a back up vehicle so it wasn't hurting for it to sit while I tried to fix it. The guy that bought it said the mechanic told him that it looked like I knew what I was doing and that it was just a stroke of bad luck about the hang-up. That made me feel a lot better.   So my wife said "it's ok, you can go truck shopping now). I bought my "new" truck and I wanted to make it shine! I found another guy on YouTube by the name of The Junkman. I know he no longer has ties with Adam's Forums, but he mentions this forum in a few of his videos. And that is how I got here! I may have a hodge-podge of detailing products, but I knew Adam's was the place to be. The people here are awesome! And I have never seen a company that has their fingers on the pulse of the customer the way Adam's does. It is truly amazing!

chops1sc

chops1sc

 

Ok, I'm not FAT fat, but I am a big guy....

I have been big my whole life. Now, my definition of big is solely based on my bigness, if you will. I can remember around 4th or 5th grade (i think) they were weighing all the kids in gym class. The 8th grader (who seemed like a grown-up) told me "you weight a hundred pounds!". It sounded like a big deal, but I had no idea what it really meant. My weight never really bothered me until that puberty, but even then there wasn't anything I could do about it. My family has never been "healthy" eaters. We ate home-cooked meals and we rarely went without a good dessert. It was just the way it was.   I am built just like my dad. He was a firefighter for 25 years and tried to stay "in shape" as best as he could. Once he retired he really started to gain weight. He probably was very close to 300lbs. He found out he has diabetes and has somewhat regained control of his situation. But he is still "big" like me. Right now I am hovering around 315lbs. The most I ever weighed was 389 back in February, 2014. I have been on phentermine to help control my appetite ever since. He said since I have a healthy heart and ok blood pressure, the benefits of the medication will out-weigh the risks of the medicine. I get a check up every month and each time I am 3-5lbs less. I cannot exercise like I need to because of 2 deteriorating discs in my back and 2 bad knees from football. This is why I have become lazy.   I have a problem. My problem is I have too many hobbies. I get into something new and I go all in. I got into RC trucks and airplanes about 9 years ago. I got back into plastic modelling about 3 years ago. The list goes on. My hobbies consume my life. My wife hates the attention that I give my hobbies. I got into PC gaming around the time Minecraft came out (2008-2009) and this really didn't help my health. I would sit at the computer and play for hours. If I wasn't playing a game I was watching others play them on YouTube. Fatter and fatter I got. I love candy, and junk food, and more candy. You see where this is going. The laziness what set in good. I couldn't stand cutting the grass. I let my vehicles go months without washing them (the horror, I know). November of last year something happened that eventually led me to this forum right here.   To be continued...

chops1sc

chops1sc

 

How to create calm environments for autistic children

Imagine not being able to filter all the visual and auditory stimulation you are exposed to every day. That’s what it’s like to be autistic: processing your own environment in order to differentiate between what’s important and what isn’t is something you actually have to physically do. When A.J. Paron-Wildes received the news her son, Devin, had autism, she didn’t know what that meant or how it would change her life. But she made it her business to figure it out.   Do your research   Being an interior designer, Paron-Wildes wanted to find out if there was a way she could make her home more peaceful for Devin, so she did her research and found out that autistic people have a more difficult time communicating and rely on cues taken from their environment to determine how to react to a situation.   “They crave order and are easily distracted by its absence,” Paron-Wildes went on. “They read meaning into seemingly random visual signals, and tend to be hypersensitive to harsh artificial light and to environmental toxins.”   Use neutral-toned color palettes   One problem this poses is that environments and toys made for children tend to be brightly colored, highly stimulating, and very overwhelming to autistic kids. Paron-Wildes described such spaces as Crayola-bright, “like Ronald McDonald threw up.” In a home where an autistic child lives, it’s better to use mild, neutral colors that are non-distracting. Today when Paron-Wildes designs spaces for autistic children, she uses the brighter colors to signal important spaces in the home or use them as maps to illuminate pathways for specific tasks.   Create peaceful “learning areas”   Most important is the rooms where the child needs to learn or pay close attention, including the bedroom and the homework or study area. “I’ve painted many little boys’ rooms pink,” Paron-Wildes said, “it tends to be a calming color.”   Provide personal space and natural light   When there are other children in the home, conflicts are likely to arise, which is why in her own home, Paron-Wildes made sure her son and her daughter’s rooms had plenty of separation. Devin’s room is large with a high ceiling, a window that lets in plenty of natural light, and an adjacent room where he can go to build elaborate Lego structures to de-stress.   When they first moved to their new home following the birth of their daughter, Eva, Paron-Wildes admitted there were some tense moments with Devin—autistic people struggle with making transitions. But today Devin is comfortable in his home. “We have zero issues now,” Paron-Wildes said.   Interior Decorating and Remodeling News Brought to You by BaseBoardRadiatorCover.com Source: buffalonews.com/life-arts/home-gardening/interior-designer-creates-peaceful-home-environments-for-autistic-kids-20141205

denissieharnet

denissieharnet

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