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Adams Flex Polisher VS Adams Cyclo Polisher


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#1 EPOCH

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 04:48 PM

:: Question :: 

Which polishing machine is better and why? 

 

:: My Thoughts ::

I know there's a 20$ difference in price but was wondering which polisher is better. I'm going to buy one at the end of the month and wanted to know what you guys thought of each machine. 


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#2 GerryC

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 04:52 PM

It's not a matter of which is better, it's a matter of which is better for you. Do you have really hard clearcoat or something with a lot of damage and you are comfortable using a machine? Flex is likely your choice. Is this your first time using a machine, have softer clearcoat or average surface damage? Cyclo might be a better fit.

 

Watch the new polishing videos and they are explained in more detail:

 


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#3 egott_91

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 05:16 PM

It can be argued either way which is "better".

I have 2 machines that I use. The Rupes LHR21 and the Cyclo 5-Pro. Rupes is better for correcting heavy damage, the cyclo is better at getting those smaller panels you can't fit a large pad on.

It's all a matter of preference too. Have you ever used a machine? If not, the cyclo has less of a learning curve. If you've used a machine for awhile, the flex might be easy for you get the hang of.

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#4 Feets31

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 05:17 PM

http://www.adamsforu...x-or-the-cyclo/

 

Here are some other thoughts on the two



#5 Team Adam's

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 05:23 PM

Gerry is correct... like with most things detailing its not about which is "BETTER" its about which one suits your needs and requirements. 

 

Short Pro/Con list for each off the top of my head. 


Pros Flex:

Powerful and capable of more serious correction

Graduated trigger "throttle" allows for more control

Pistol grip and bale head are comfortable to work with

Clutched startup makes for smooth start/stops

 

Cons Flex:

Can be a little fatiguing to work with for long periods of time (shoulder burn!)
Vibrates a fair amount... not as bad as some tools, but not the smoothest tool to work with.

Learning curve to get 'perfect' is slightly steeper thanks to the forced rotation and the wrinkle that adds to the process. 

Limited on pad size options even with aftermarket plates. 

 

Pros Cyclo:

100% made in the USA

Smoothest operating tool in the business, very low vibration

All metal housing is very durable

All parts are easily serviceable. 

Dual 4" heads allow you to get into various spots that larger pads won't fit (pillars, etc)

Can accept various attachments for other tasks besides polishing (coming soon)

Easy to pick up and learn with. 

 

Cons Cyclo:

Less powerful than the flex, may require more passes on more damaged finishes. 

Takes more time to fluff/brush 2 heads than just 1. 

Takes more time to setup for use (attach and center 2 pads each time)


Edited by Dylan@Adams, 05 August 2013 - 05:24 PM.


#6 EPOCH

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 07:34 PM

Gerry is correct... like with most things detailing its not about which is "BETTER" its about which one suits your needs and requirements. 

 

Short Pro/Con list for each off the top of my head. 


Pros Flex:

Powerful and capable of more serious correction

Graduated trigger "throttle" allows for more control

Pistol grip and bale head are comfortable to work with

Clutched startup makes for smooth start/stops

 

Cons Flex:

Can be a little fatiguing to work with for long periods of time (shoulder burn!)
Vibrates a fair amount... not as bad as some tools, but not the smoothest tool to work with.

Learning curve to get 'perfect' is slightly steeper thanks to the forced rotation and the wrinkle that adds to the process. 

Limited on pad size options even with aftermarket plates. 

 

Pros Cyclo:

100% made in the USA

Smoothest operating tool in the business, very low vibration

All metal housing is very durable

All parts are easily serviceable. 

Dual 4" heads allow you to get into various spots that larger pads won't fit (pillars, etc)

Can accept various attachments for other tasks besides polishing (coming soon)

Easy to pick up and learn with. 

 

Cons Cyclo:

Less powerful than the flex, may require more passes on more damaged finishes. 

Takes more time to fluff/brush 2 heads than just 1. 

Takes more time to setup for use (attach and center 2 pads each time)

 

 

http://www.adamsforu...x-or-the-cyclo/

 

Here are some other thoughts on the two

 

 

It can be argued either way which is "better".

I have 2 machines that I use. The Rupes LHR21 and the Cyclo 5-Pro. Rupes is better for correcting heavy damage, the cyclo is better at getting those smaller panels you can't fit a large pad on.

It's all a matter of preference too. Have you ever used a machine? If not, the cyclo has less of a learning curve. If you've used a machine for awhile, the flex might be easy for you get the hang of.

 

 

Some great advice and glad I asked because this would be my first polishing machine I'm thinking about going with the cyclo. 


Edited by EPOCH, 05 August 2013 - 07:35 PM.

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#7 IrishCurse

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 07:47 PM

Also, lets not forget that along with the Flex's corrective abilities, its also MUCH faster "pound for pound" correcting than the cyclo.  I'm really looking at the Bigfoot too.  Some very talented detailers on this site are using it more and more.



#8 EPOCH

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 07:59 PM

I'm going to get my car painted in December or January. So I'm wondering in that case I shouldn't need many corrections I wouldn't think but you never know. After watching the video's I really care decide LOL! 

 

Also, lets not forget that along with the Flex's corrective abilities, its also MUCH faster "pound for pound" correcting than the cyclo.  I'm really looking at the Bigfoot too.  Some very talented detailers on this site are using it more and more.


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#9 xkwj43z

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 08:17 PM

I used my Cyclo for the first time this past weekend and... WOW! I am very happy with it. Pretty much zero vibration, low noise, but the noise just like all polishers starts to get annoying towards the end of the job. The biggest plus I think is that the Cyclo fits into spots the Flex can't, like pillars for example.  For someone new to polishing I would suggest you purchase a Cyclo the learning curve was very short.


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#10 BMWguy206

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 06:41 PM

Thank you for your review. I use to have a PC and Flex but sold them. Now I am thinking about buying another polisher and I am leaning more towards the Cyclo. 

 

I used my Cyclo for the first time this past weekend and... WOW! I am very happy with it. Pretty much zero vibration, low noise, but the noise just like all polishers starts to get annoying towards the end of the job. The biggest plus I think is that the Cyclo fits into spots the Flex can't, like pillars for example.  For someone new to polishing I would suggest you purchase a Cyclo the learning curve was very short.


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#11 DonJuan692006

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 02:28 PM

I'm going to get my car painted in December or January. So I'm wondering in that case I shouldn't need many corrections I wouldn't think but you never know. After watching the video's I really care decide LOL!


The Cyclo would be perfect for you. I finally used mine over the weekend and man it was easy. The hardest part was getting the product/prime right. It did an excellent job at the the god awful amount of micro scratches I had (improper washing) and I feel like the deeper scratches just need another pass (I only did one each of correcting/finishing polish).

#12 BMWguy206

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:08 AM

For those with the Flex 3401, how do you correct and polish the paint on the pillars and small areas? 



#13 BKazzle

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:30 AM

For those with the Flex 3401, how do you correct and polish the paint on the pillars and small areas?


Smaller backing plate and smaller pads for the Flex.

If I need smaller, I have another polisher for that, plus I have Adam's drill attachments as well.




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