Jump to content
Customer Service 866.965.0400
  • 0
senorlechero

What's more important?

Question

I just recently got into detailing my own vehicles. Before it was mostly drive through car washes or bucket wash with stuff from Oreillys.

 

 And now I want to be able to get paint perfect and keep it that way. 

 

Unfortunately I went to another supplier to get the machine and and polishes/compound, this was before I discovered how good Adam's stuff is. 

 

The machine is a Torq 10FX and there are about a billion combinations of pad/polish/compound that you can use. 

 

So my question is which is more important, the machine I'm using or the pad/polish combo? 

 

I'm not getting anywhere near the results that I want so I'm going to make a change, just wondering if I need to swap out the machine as well. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

14 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

The pad and correction polishes and compounds do play a big roll. Along with the machine speed and how long, fast or slow you work a panel. Adam’s has how to videos on buffing and they also talk about speeds and technique.

 

I know other very experienced guys will drop in here and give more detailed info.

 

This video is a great starting point. Even after all my years (growing up around) of buffing new paint at a body shop I was running my Flex too slow.

Edited by FrozenWS6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I would say the polish and pads are more important than the machine. However, the most important part will simply be your technique and experience. An experienced person who knows what hes doing will likely achieve better results with a harbor freight polisher than a rookie with a rupes. 

 

I think you already have a decent machine and upgrading will net you no results. Try practicing on a different car. Maybe a buddy who has a beater. What exactly are you struggling with? Im sure everyone here can throw in some tips. 

 

Remember to work in small sections. I think 2'x2' is the general rule of thumb, but I always start smaller. Sometimes 1'x1' until I find the method that works for me. Also dont rush it. If its a big vehicle, you can also break it down into multiple days. 

 

Also different clears and colors make it more difficult or easier to polish. My car has black paint, and it was pretty easy to see the imperfections, so it was also easy to correct. However, my truck is silver and it was a PITA to correct it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I agree with Chonke and Frozen, product and pad, but overall technique.  As was mentioned, start with a 2 x 2 area, even tape off a few of these areas.  Work one of those areas until you have results you want, then use that 'formula' on the rest of the car.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I'd say it's a combo of technique and product. Nothing like an on the fence answer, huh?! What you need, though, will depend on your car and desired results.

What kind of car? How good or bad is the paint? Any pictures you can share?

 

A quick search shows the Torq 10FX is an 8mm DA orbital polisher, and can be fitted with a few different size backing plates, anywhere from 3-6". The throw isn't as much as you'll get with, say, the new Swirl Killer (15mm), but with the proper technique (e.g., crosshatch pattern, slow and steady, and the right speed(s) selected on the polisher for the correction needed), you can get similar results, albeit with a little more effort. I have a PC 7424XP, which I think is also an 8mm throw, and use Adam's exclusively with great results. As an "average, every day" detailer, a Dual Action orbital is what you should be looking for, so you're good there. The different size backing plates will allow different size pads, including those that Adam's sells. Just check the specs on the pads before you buy.

 

If you haven't already, be sure to watch the videos on Adam's website for more insight. http://adamspolishes.com/video

 

When ready to make the change, click over to Adam's website, grab an adult beverage (as long as you're over 21!), break out your wallet, and await the shine!

 

P.S. One caveat to Mike's post above re: tape...do NOT use tape with "locking" edges! Regular blue painters tape or green automotive will work just fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Thanks for all the responses so far. 

 

I've watched  Adams videos, as well as some others and did my best to follow the advice in them. 

 

The vehicle is a 2017 Toyota 4Runner in black, it's metallic black, and has the unfortunately typical swirls and scratches from horrific car lot washings 

 

on two different occasions I have attempted to correct the paint, working a 2ish x 2ish square on the hood netted shiny paint with scratches in it still. 

 

So I think I'll grab Adams pads and polishes and give that a shot next time around. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I concur with all the above, any machine will do, it’s all about how you handle the scandal with what you have. Unless you have that chemical guys junk lol, I’m guessing you do but that’s ok. We all have to learn some how.

 

 

Tyler, do you work this Thursday? I have some business to take care of in San Diego, I could head down there early show you a thing or two if your interested? Let me know if your interested and we can work something out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

This quote from The Junkman I always keep in mind, "Technique trumps product". I have a pair of Harbor Freight DA polishers that I have been using for 2 years without issue. I've tried a few different brands of pads trying to find the "best brand" but I always found that the way I run the machine dictated how the detail goes.

 

Another thing to keep in mind is to perfect what works for you. The way I or Adam or anyone else on here works a polisher will be different from the way you end up using yours. You may find that your paint responds better to a certain polish. It may not be the polish you want to use, but you have to do what works for you and your car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I concur with all the above, any machine will do, it’s all about how you handle the scandal with what you have. Unless you have that chemical guys junk lol, I’m guessing you do but that’s ok. We all have to learn some how.

 

 

Tyler, do you work this Thursday? I have some business to take care of in San Diego, I could head down there early show you a thing or two if your interested? Let me know if your interested and we can work something out.

I actually have thursday off, that'd be awesome! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I concur with all the above, any machine will do, it’s all about how you handle the scandal with what you have. Unless you have that chemical guys junk lol, I’m guessing you do but that’s ok. We all have to learn some how.

Tyler, do you work this Thursday? I have some business to take care of in San Diego, I could head down there early show you a thing or two if your interested? Let me know if your interested and we can work something out.

  

I actually have thursday off, that'd be awesome!

 

Pictures or it didn't happen, gentlemen!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

technique first, over the years i've found that compound/polish doesn't differ that much from brand to brand, it's about technique.  most helpful advice when i was new to DA Polishers was that when you think you're going slow enough, go a little slower!  also mark a black line on the backing plate, i'm sure when i was new i tried polishing a couple spots where the disc didn't even spin at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×