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ragin_cajuns

Polished for the first time

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I finally got a chance to polish my wife's car this weekend.  I washed it with strip wash, clayed it, washed again and dried the car.  I then used Adam's correcting polish, then the finishing polish, then paint sealant.  All went as expected except the first step of the polishing - the correcting polish.  I would polish a section about 2'x2' then wipe it off.  The correcting polish was very hard to wipe off, very hard.  Hardest time I have ever had wiping something off.  The finishing polish and paint sealant came off very easy.

It was overcast, no sun at all, and probably in the high 60s.  In case weather had something to do with it.

I still have my truck and Jeep to do soon and don't look forward to fighting the correcting polish again.

Thoughts?

 

Edited by ragin_cajuns

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Too much makes it hard to remove?  I don't mean it was hard to remove because there was too much of it being smeared around.  I mean it was so hard to rub off.  I had to put some serious pressure on it to get it off with an Adam's towel.  I probably worked it a few minutes maybe.

I thought I used about the same amount of polish as I have seen in the videos.

 

Edited by ragin_cajuns

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Often times less is more when it comes to polish. Too much can make it difficult to remove  

How long did you work the polish?  Did you work it until it flashed over to a clear-ish color?  Almost like Vaseline. 

If you’re ever having a hard time, a spray of detail spray goes a long way toward helping to remove stubborn residue. 

Another factor is humidity. On rainy days or hot, humid ones nothing comes off as easily. 

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It wasn't humid.  Maybe I didn't work it long enough.  I'll try working it longer on my next vehicle.

Generally how long do you work a section?  I think I did it for about 2 mins.  It never became oily or Vaseline like. 

 

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50 minutes ago, ragin_cajuns said:

It wasn't humid.  Maybe I didn't work it long enough.  I'll try working it longer on my next vehicle.

Generally how long do you work a section?  I think I did it for about 2 mins.  It never became oily or Vaseline like. 

 

We don’t use a set time since it’s variable on a number of factors. The pad you use, pressure, machine speed, humidity, etc. The list goes on.

Typically when the polishes flash over (meaning the open working time of the polish is done), it turns almost greasy. That being said, we’ve done some work while it hasn’t needed to be worked completely. In these cases, we buff off immediately. 

Another thought...did you glaze your vehicle after?  You can apply glaze right over the polish residue and the solvents in the glaze will aid in polish removal. Just food for thought. 

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14 hours ago, shane@detailedreflections said:

We don’t use a set time since it’s variable on a number of factors. The pad you use, pressure, machine speed, humidity, etc. The list goes on.

Typically when the polishes flash over (meaning the open working time of the polish is done), it turns almost greasy. That being said, we’ve done some work while it hasn’t needed to be worked completely. In these cases, we buff off immediately. 

Another thought...did you glaze your vehicle after?  You can apply glaze right over the polish residue and the solvents in the glaze will aid in polish removal. Just food for thought. 

No, after the correcting polish I buffed it off then went over it with finishing polish buffed it off and sealed with paint sealant.  I'm gonna try working it a little longer on my next vehicle in a few weeks.

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Is it not recommended for best results to rewash or at least wipe down with water/alcohol solution after polish before applying sealant, glaze or waxes? 

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4 hours ago, FP350S said:

Is it not recommended for best results to rewash or at least wipe down with water/alcohol solution after polish before applying sealant, glaze or waxes? 

The oils in the polishes need to be removed prior to applying Paint Sealant.  This is not needed for waxes and glazes, since they do not bond to the paint like synthetic sealants do.

A synthetic sealant like Paint Sealant gets its long protection life by actually bonding to the paint.  In order to get the best bond, the paint needs to be cleaned of all oils or other contaminates.

I prefer strip washing after polishing and prior to applying sealant, since it does a better job at removing the oils.  Depending on technique and how many clean towels are used, it is possible that a wipe down with Isopropyl Alcohol will not remove all the oils.  For example, just using one towel for the wipe down will likely just be spreading the oils around, rather than actually removing them from the surface.

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On 11/17/2017 at 4:44 PM, FP350S said:

Is it not recommended for best results to rewash or at least wipe down with water/alcohol solution after polish before applying sealant, glaze or waxes? 

 

20 hours ago, TheWolf said:

The oils in the polishes need to be removed prior to applying Paint Sealant.  This is not needed for waxes and glazes, since they do not bond to the paint like synthetic sealants do.

A synthetic sealant like Paint Sealant gets its long protection life by actually bonding to the paint.  In order to get the best bond, the paint needs to be cleaned of all oils or other contaminates.

I prefer strip washing after polishing and prior to applying sealant, since it does a better job at removing the oils.  Depending on technique and how many clean towels are used, it is possible that a wipe down with Isopropyl Alcohol will not remove all the oils.  For example, just using one towel for the wipe down will likely just be spreading the oils around, rather than actually removing them from the surface.

You could also use Adam's Coating Prep to remove any polishing oils.  The plus is it contains lubricants that diluted IPA does not have.   I have used a similar product from another company with excellent results.  

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