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Carsten

Correcting old single stage paint

Question

Hello from Denmark 

 

I am a weekend warrior, and love to work on all kind of cars. 

My dad in law owns a few classic cars and soon I will get a chance to go "All In" on one of them. Its a Buick Invicta convertible from 1960. It is black with red interior and a white top.

The paint is single stage.  Dont Know if it has been repaintet or it is original. But it is in a Very bad condition. 

I recently polished an old Black Studebaker Lark.  I used Meguiars DA Correction system with microfiber pads on a DA polisher, and their d300 compound.  Bad idea.....it made a LOT of haze. I then used a foam pad and their d301 finishing wax to remove the haze.

But I dont want any wax already in the process when I start on the Buick.  

My plan is to give it some type of glaze Before any wax. But first I want the paint to be as perfect as possible.  Thats why im Looking for a fine finishing polish as yours.  I can see it has Si02 in it... will that be a problem if I want a layer of glaze after ?

My experience with the Studebaker told me Black single stage paint is Very soft.  Do you Think your finishing polish is Enough or do I need a compound Before that ?  Will you recommend sticking to foam pads ?

I would love all kind of tips on how you guys would detail this car from A - Z.

 

Looking forwards to read your advise 

Kind regards Carsten 

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4 answers to this question

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For single stage paint I would use a foam pad. Adams has three products for paint correction. Adams Compound (most aggressive) Paint Correcting Polish, and the Finishing Polish (least aggressive). I would do a test area to see what will work. Judging by the paint I think you will need at least the Adams Paint Correcting Polish followed by the Finishing Polish. Adams foam pads are color coordinated with the polishes. You will be able to use a glaze after using the Finishing Polish. Post some pictures when you are done!

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Thanks for your answer. 

Will Carpro Eraser remove the extra shine Si02 give ?   I usually use Eraser after correcting...  Maybe a glaze wont do anyting good if the finishing polish is as shiny as told in the Youtube videos?

 

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4 hours ago, Carsten said:

Thanks for your answer. 

Will Carpro Eraser remove the extra shine Si02 give ?   I usually use Eraser after correcting...  Maybe a glaze wont do anyting good if the finishing polish is as shiny as told in the Youtube videos?

 

      I do not think the Carpro Eraser would remove any noticeable shine. It will remove the polishing oils/residue. I wash the car after polishing to remove the oils.           

     This time after polishing our Challenger Hellcat I washed it then applied Adams Patriot Wax, which also has SiO2 in it. I usually use Adams Brillant Glaze before applying wax/sealant but decided to try this and was very impressed with the results! You probably could skip the glazing step. 

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First of all welcome, second ditch the Meg stuff and upgrade yourself to Adams paint correcting products ! They will work faster, easier and produce better results in the end, As far as one stage paint, be careful ! Its a one shot deal and with older cars like that there's no turning back if you screw up. Go slow, be careful on corners and take your time, chances are the paint on the car is older than you. Here's some pics of some one stage paint corrections using ADAMS products. So start with an order to Adams on paint correcting products, get some Brilliant Glaze and Americana Wax, and have at it !

 

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