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ShadowBrookeShine

How to remove adam's ceramic caoting?? Or remove water spots from the coating??

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Currently running into an issue with a ceramic not coming out the way that I had planned after a few months of not seeing the car it cam back to me with a haze and pretty heavy water spots all over the vehicle. I boosted the vehicle once I got it and that removed the haze from the vehicle, but there is still quite a bit of water spots around the entire vehicle that I can't seem to rub off with boost. Is the only way to remove water spots by removing the coating if possible or is there a way that using a high PH soap will be able to get rid of those spots? any answers will be greatly appreciated, and any advice will also be greatly appreciated.

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2 hours ago, Yo-Yo Ma's Cousin said:

I wonder if coating the car would help?

Well the car is coated and the owner just didn't seem to take care of the car after they had it done or contact me with questions regarding ceramic care.

 

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5 hours ago, ShadowBrookeShine said:

Well the car is coated and the owner just didn't seem to take care of the car after they had it done or contact me with questions regarding ceramic care.

 

Hey, Cristian, sorry I typed that on my phone and it must have gotten autocorrected. Otherwise I'm just an idiot.

 

I meant to say claying* - I wonder if claying would help

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8 hours ago, Yo-Yo Ma's Cousin said:

Hey, Cristian, sorry I typed that on my phone and it must have gotten autocorrected. Otherwise I'm just an idiot.

 

I meant to say claying* - I wonder if claying would help

From people I’ve talked to about clay baring ceramiced cars it seems to pull the coating off with the clear and even base coats sometimes, not I don’t know if this is true but I don’t want to try it due to possible damage 

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9 hours ago, ShadowBrookeShine said:

From people I’ve talked to about clay baring ceramiced cars it seems to pull the coating off with the clear and even base coats sometimes, not I don’t know if this is true but I don’t want to try it due to possible damage 

Gotcha, yeah, not worth it if you’re unsure about it.

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17 hours ago, ShadowBrookeShine said:

From people I’ve talked to about clay baring ceramiced cars it seems to pull the coating off with the clear and even base coats sometimes, not I don’t know if this is true but I don’t want to try it due to possible damage 

 

I don’t know who told you this, but it’s largely false information. If coatings could be removed by clay, nobody would ever use them for the time/effort/expense of installation. 

 

Claying a coating is a standard maintenance process for every coating we have worked with. 

 

Coating life spans are generally measured in years. They require maintenance. And they require care. They can become contaminated and do require cleaning. In fact, most coating “failures” aren’t failures at all but coatings that require maintenance. 

 

To remove the water spots, use a fine finishing polish and see if that clears it up. Adams is not the most durable coating out there (as are most consumer grade coatings, so I’m not singling them out). So aggressive working of polishes or aggressive ones will remove the coating. A quick pass of finishing polish should knock most of the issues down. 

 

Food for thought, in a product that spans years and forms a bond to paint it will take a mechanical abrasive process to remove. Most chemicals and soft products will have no removal effect (but can mar the finish if used incorrectly). 

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On 6/8/2019 at 8:43 AM, shane@detailedreflections said:

 

I don’t know who told you this, but it’s largely false information. If coatings could be removed by clay, nobody would ever use them for the time/effort/expense of installation. 

 

Claying a coating is a standard maintenance process for every coating we have worked with. 

 

Coating life spans are generally measured in years. They require maintenance. And they require care. They can become contaminated and do require cleaning. In fact, most coating “failures” aren’t failures at all but coatings that require maintenance. 

 

To remove the water spots, use a fine finishing polish and see if that clears it up. Adams is not the most durable coating out there (as are most consumer grade coatings, so I’m not singling them out). So aggressive working of polishes or aggressive ones will remove the coating. A quick pass of finishing polish should knock most of the issues down. 

 

Food for thought, in a product that spans years and forms a bond to paint it will take a mechanical abrasive process to remove. Most chemicals and soft products will have no removal effect (but can mar the finish if used incorrectly). 

 

Listen to him.  

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On 6/8/2019 at 5:43 AM, shane@detailedreflections said:

 

I don’t know who told you this, but it’s largely false information. If coatings could be removed by clay, nobody would ever use them for the time/effort/expense of installation. 

 

Claying a coating is a standard maintenance process for every coating we have worked with. 

 

Coating life spans are generally measured in years. They require maintenance. And they require care. They can become contaminated and do require cleaning. In fact, most coating “failures” aren’t failures at all but coatings that require maintenance. 

 

To remove the water spots, use a fine finishing polish and see if that clears it up. Adams is not the most durable coating out there (as are most consumer grade coatings, so I’m not singling them out). So aggressive working of polishes or aggressive ones will remove the coating. A quick pass of finishing polish should knock most of the issues down. 

 

Food for thought, in a product that spans years and forms a bond to paint it will take a mechanical abrasive process to remove. Most chemicals and soft products will have no removal effect (but can mar the finish if used incorrectly). 

Good to know I’m still learning a lot not new to detail but newish to hard exterior coatings so I appreciate the answer

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