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I have cars come in with scuffs where the door entry is on the plastic pieces! I usually clean it and then apply some leather conditioner to “cover” it. Is there anything else better to use that may stay on long term?

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Depends on how deep they are, and if the plastic is frayed or just scuffed (those don't look too bad at all, but only you can really tell). First, use a cleaner like APC (diluted 5:1 or 10:1 will work fine) or, my new favorite, Interior Cleaning Gel to clean the surface. Then, use a Deep Clean Eraser wetted with the cleaner to rub over the scuffs, wipe off residue, and check the results. Repeat only as necessary, not getting too aggressive at any point. One or two rounds should at least reduce, if not eliminate those pesky marks. Take some after shots so we can see the results!

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6 hours ago, Carter Bowen said:

Is there anything else better to use that may stay on long term?

5 hours ago, falcaineer said:

Depends on how deep they are, and if the plastic is frayed or just scuffed (those don't look too bad at all, but only you can really tell). First, use a cleaner like APC (diluted 5:1 or 10:1 will work fine) or, my new favorite, Interior Cleaning Gel to clean the surface. Then, use a Deep Clean Eraser wetted with the cleaner to rub over the scuffs, wipe off residue, and check the results. Repeat only as necessary, not getting too aggressive at any point. One or two rounds should at least reduce, if not eliminate those pesky marks. Take some after shots so we can see the results!

^ Yes Interior Cleaning Gel is awesome. If you don't have an eraser, I've had pretty good luck with a utility microfiber towel for marks of about this caliber.

 

That door sill looks pretty similar to mine. In terms of protection. I'm not so sure, I've been doing the same thing you have with LC. I've been wondering if this is a spot where VRT can do it's thing. I have not tried it yet. If you do try it, be aware that VRT may make this surface slick, so be careful about injury.

 

 

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I just realized I may not have even answered the right question. If you're only looking to add protection, I like the look of ID and the light sheen it gives on the surface. VRT might work, but as @Yo-Yo Ma's Cousin said, may also make them slick. Ceramic Spray Coating also comes to mind, but I haven't tried it on that part of the car before.

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6 minutes ago, falcaineer said:

I just realized I may not have even answered the right question. If you're only looking to add protection, I like the look of ID and the light sheen it gives on the surface. VRT might work, but as @Yo-Yo Ma's Cousin said, may also make them slick. Ceramic Spray Coating also comes to mind, but I haven't tried it on that part of the car before.

I get nervous applying chemicals indoors that have the California Warning on them. I think both VRT and CSC have that warning on them.

Would you happen to know anything about that?

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7 hours ago, falcaineer said:

Depends on how deep they are, and if the plastic is frayed or just scuffed (those don't look too bad at all, but only you can really tell). First, use a cleaner like APC (diluted 5:1 or 10:1 will work fine) or, my new favorite, Interior Cleaning Gel to clean the surface. Then, use a Deep Clean Eraser wetted with the cleaner to rub over the scuffs, wipe off residue, and check the results. Repeat only as necessary, not getting too aggressive at any point. One or two rounds should at least reduce, if not eliminate those pesky marks. Take some after shots so we can see the results!

Thank you for the help, I will give it a try on the next one that has it!! 

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I wonder if this will work on scratches on the dash and glove box. My girlfriend refuses to keep her feet on the floor

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Be careful using a deep clean or magic eraser.  Those things can and will remove dyes in addition to scuffs and they leave residue.   I use Leather Cleaner to take those type marks off.  Works great.  

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These trim pieces are textured plastic and can't be polished out like a gloss plastic or paint can.  You can clean them, but repairing them or making them better is of limited benefit.  Scuffs are caused by abrasion.  Once the plastic scuffs, it becomes visible.  It's a fact of life.  The way to prevent this is to educate your clients about picking their feet up when they get in the vehicle.  The reality is that most clients don't care about that (or some have mobility issues which can't be corrected).  They care about clean.  Manage your clients expectations, clean the surface and move on.  

 

It would be great to correct everyone's damages, but it's not realistic.  This applies to you as a service provider, and them as a client for what they're going to get.

 

All that being said, we clean the textured plastic with a variety of boars hair brushes, towels, steam and APC or Interior Detailer.

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