Jump to content
Customer Service 866.965.0400
  • 0
galaxy

Figuring Out New Polishes Lineup

Question

So how do these new polishes fit into the game?  Now there’s only two. I had worked with the old labels enough and there was a definitive difference between correcting polish and finishing polish. Both had their place, did a job, and you could tell the difference.  Now what?  Is the new “polish” too aggressive to finish down and do what the old finishing polish did?  How do they all compare? 

 

 Because, all I see is white and blue. With the old labels, finishing polish would not be enough to remove the markings left behind from the correcting compound. Orange had it’s place.  Are you now saying white is good enough to remove blue markings?  If so, then I argue it won’t finish out like it used to.  Or either blue is a lot less aggressive than it used to be.  

Edited by galaxy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

14 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

This 2-step system replaces all functionality and correction properties/capabilities of the old 3-step system, and then some. Essentially the Compound is way more versatile, and while a solid product (I liked it, too!), CP wasn't needed to accomplish even better results with less steps. They've made some great strides with these new formulas and pads, and if you haven't tried them, I encourage you to withhold judgment and give them a shot. I also have a request in to Adam's for user-friendly info on the new system and how it compares. Standby...I'll post it as soon as I have it.

 

In the meantime, to answer your questions initially from what I've seen/read and experienced...

 

The Polish is not "too aggressive," accomplishes all of what the FP did, and will finish down similar to lf not better than the FP. It's capable of finishing down any residual Compound markings, as well. However, the Compound is way more versatile and has a broader range of uses.

 

To that end, the Compound cuts more and actually finishes quite a bit more/finer than HCC. It also finishes more than CP did, rendering the CP obsolete. Using it on a microfiber pad will give more cutting power, and switching to a blue foam pad lets you finish even better.

 

Hope that helps!

 

Again, I'll post any authorized info Adam's gives me. Thanks for your patience...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
14 hours ago, falcaineer said:

This 2-step system replaces all functionality and correction properties/capabilities of the old 3-step system, and then some. Essentially the Compound is way more versatile, and while a solid product (I liked it, too!), CP wasn't needed to accomplish even better results with less steps. They've made some great strides with these new formulas and pads, and if you haven't tried them, I encourage you to withhold judgment and give them a shot. I also have a request in to Adam's for user-friendly info on the new system and how it compares. Standby...I'll post it as soon as I have it.

 

In the meantime, to answer your questions initially from what I've seen/read and experienced...

 

The Polish is not "too aggressive," accomplishes all of what the FP did, and will finish down similar to lf not better than the FP. It's capable of finishing down any residual Compound markings, as well. However, the Compound is way more versatile and has a broader range of uses.

 

To that end, the Compound cuts more and actually finishes quite a bit more/finer than HCC. It also finishes more than CP did, rendering the CP obsolete. Using it on a microfiber pad will give more cutting power, and switching to a blue foam pad lets you finish even better.

 

Hope that helps!

 

Again, I'll post any authorized info Adam's gives me. Thanks for your patience...

Hi Chris,

While you are inquiring about the compound and polish, can you also ask about the investments we have made in pads.  I have no intent of changing pads until my current ones need replacing, which will be well after I have had to purchase the new compound and polish.  
 

The old system was rather easy, Orange went with Orange.  Granted, I know what a Orange pad does and when it should be used, but it would still be nice to hear from the manufacturer on their recommendations for using our previous investment in pads.

 

— Thanks

Edited by RayS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
2 hours ago, RayS said:

Hi Chris,

While you are inquiring about the compound and polish, can you also ask about the investments we have made in pads.  I have no intent of changing pads until my current ones need replacing, which will be well after I have had to purchase the new compound and polish.  
 

The old system was rather easy, Orange went with Orange.  Granted, I know what a Orange pad does and when it should be used, but it would still be nice to hear from the manufacturer on their recommendations for using our previous investment in pads.

 

— Thanks

 

Sure will, Ray! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Thanks Chris!  And trust me, I was passing no judgement. I knew a description was in there somewhere, and any assumptions I had were that there was a logical explanation.  .  

Edited by galaxy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
On 11/28/2019 at 8:17 AM, galaxy said:

So how do these new polishes fit into the game?  Now there’s only two. I had worked with the old labels enough and there was a definitive difference between correcting polish and finishing polish. Both had their place, did a job, and you could tell the difference.  Now what?  Is the new “polish” too aggressive to finish down and do what the old finishing polish did?  How do they all compare? 

 

 Because, all I see is white and blue. With the old labels, finishing polish would not be enough to remove the markings left behind from the correcting compound. Orange had it’s place.  Are you now saying white is good enough to remove blue markings?  If so, then I argue it won’t finish out like it used to.  Or either blue is a lot less aggressive than it used to be.  

 

On 11/29/2019 at 4:54 AM, RayS said:

While you are inquiring about the compound and polish, can you also ask about the investments we have made in pads.  I have no intent of changing pads until my current ones need replacing, which will be well after I have had to purchase the new compound and polish.  
 

The old system was rather easy, Orange went with Orange.  Granted, I know what a Orange pad does and when it should be used, but it would still be nice to hear from the manufacturer on their recommendations for using our previous investment in pads.

 

I've used Adam's products for a long time, during which I've seen polishing systems come and go. IIRC... 3-steps (green, orange, and white) went to 2-steps (orange and white). Then, we went back to 3-steps (blue, orange, and white). Now, we're back to 2-steps (blue and white). Somewhere in there, a 1-step (purple) option also became available.  This can be confusing (and a bit frustrating when you've invested in pads/polishes).  The good news is Adam's R&D is ongoing - each new generation/product (line) improves on the previous one. That said and with all due respect to the company's desire for sales, I've never stressed over the upgrades or found it necessary to discard products I have in favor of what's "new." As long as they remain serviceable, you should finish what you have on hand before migrating to new stuff.  More importantly, we've always had the option of mixing/matching polishes and pads as desired/needed - as long as they're still serviceable, "old" pads work just fine with "new" polishes. (e.g., When working on my wife's BMW several years ago, I found that blue Heavy Correcting Compound on an orange Correcting Pad was the "right" combination to correct the damage, followed by orange Correcting Polish on another orange Correcting Pad to "finish" the job. Neither MF nor blue pads were required.) 

 

The best guide when integrating new products into your routine is to always use the least aggressive means to achieve the finish you want. With that in mind and when you've exhausted your existing polishes/pads, I recommend buying both the new Compound and Polish, along with their respective color-coded pads. Working on a test area of your vehicle, see if Polish and its pad achieve the look you want. If so, finish the job with them, knowing that Compound is available if/when you get deeper swirls/scratches. If not, migrate to the more aggressive Compound on its pad (or a MF pad), knowing you may need to perform a second step Polish when you're done Compounding. (FWIW, I don't worry about Finishing Polish/Pads on anything but my show cars. Correcting Polish/Pads always gets me what I want on the daily drivers.) Based on @falcaineer's description, it sounds like the new Compound delivers results against damage that previously required Heavy Correcting Compound while finishing better than Correcting Polish, thanks to the chemical geniuses at Adam's!

Edited by Norton

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Great write up Norton; agree with all.

 
 One thing I would add is that I don’t like referring to these products as “steps”.  They are each stand alone products that should be chosen for the specific job at hand. The last thing we need is someone new or unfamiliar with paint correction thinking they need to start with “step 1, heavy correcting compound, then step 2”...and so on. 

Edited by galaxy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
On 12/2/2019 at 11:54 AM, Norton said:

Based on @falcaineer's description, it sounds like the new Compound delivers results against damage that previously required Heavy Correcting Compound while finishing better than Correcting Polish

 

Exactly, Steve!

 

And @RayS, I haven't forgotten. Still waiting on firm info from Adam's. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
On 12/2/2019 at 6:33 PM, galaxy said:

Great write up Norton; agree with all.

 
 One thing I would add is that I don’t like referring to these products as “steps”.  They are each stand alone products that should be chosen for the specific job at hand. The last thing we need is someone new or unfamiliar with paint correction thinking they need to start with “step 1, heavy correcting compound, then step 2”...and so on. 

 

A person new to machine polishing should absolutely understand there are steps. Adam's sells a 1 step polish. You could use the compound without the polish after wards, but it's meant to be a 2 part system.  An experienced detailer could probably get a pretty nice finish with just the compound using the right pad and proper technique. A 1st timer wouldn't be able to do the same.  I detail professionally and anyone who asks about paint correction I explain the difference between a 1,2 & 3 step.  I'll never recommend a 1 step with just a compound over a AIO or one step polish. And any noob who just uses the Compound, yeah they might even be really happy with the results. But they'll really be missing out on what the finish could look like if they had did a 2 step. Learning proper technique is vital, so understanding the 3 potential steps is going to be where everyone should start.   I have the exact opposite opinion on what I bolded, what we don't need is a person who's never polished just buying the compound and a few blue pads and thinking they're good to go. What you said is exactly the 1st thing anyone should learn about machine polishing. You need to understand the different liquids, different pads and different steps. 

 

I have 6 different types of pads

Foam - coarse, medium, soft finishing

wool

MF-hybrid, and a MF-hybrid finishing pad.

And I have a boat load of different compounds and polishes.

 

While I wouldn't overwhelm some one looking to get into paint correction with everything I have. Definitely at least the 2 main steps and the difference between a cutting and a finishing pad.

 

 

Edited by quebert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
On 12/16/2019 at 5:57 PM, falcaineer said:

 

I'll follow up with the team this week. Hope to have something for everyone soon. @RayS

Just curious, is it soon yet? This shouldn't be this hard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Here’s a picture of the roof of my truck from a month ago...this was a used beater truck i have been messing with for some time now.  The roof of this thing was probably never touched since it came off the assembly line in 2001.  Here you can see that,  and on the bottom right, was just a single pass of Coumpound w/ Blue Pad and Polish w/ White Pad.  It was chilly and I didn’t have a ton of time, definitely needed the Microfiber pad, so maybe in the spring I’ll get at it again.

 

Either way the products did a hell of a job.

I topped it with Spray Coating, but no pics of that, sorry.

image.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
On 1/31/2020 at 11:28 PM, dave 316 said:

Anybody???????   @falcaineer   how did you make out with that explanation ?

 

Sorry, forgot about this one. I never did get permission from them to post the diagrams I have, but I'll follow up again. Hopefully my explanation above gives a good idea of their performance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...