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33 in. 33 out.


Nordgrey
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Just watched them winch out the shift foreman in the Chilean mine. An absolutely incredible feat of engineering.

 

Before I joined the Navy I was a hard rock miner in gold and lead/zinc mines for five years and before that I grew up in coal mining country. Miners are a special breed, so here is a tune from a local songstress.

 

Working Man,

 

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Teresa, for me, the first couple days I was INTENSLY aware of everything going on around me, it is that alien and environment. But like any other job, it quickly became a work place, much like any other.

 

I will say that miners are the most professional people I have ever had the pleasure of working with. There was the usual horsing around in the change room or "the dry" as we called it, before and after each shift, but the moment we went through that portal and planet Earth was in every direction you looked, it was all business because you instinctively know that each and every miner on your shift depends on everyone doing their job the right way to make sure that the number of tags on the "out" board at the end of the shift is the same as the number that started the shift.

 

That's not to say that no fun was had underground. When I started, I was a "Nipper". Nipper for nip over here and get that, nip over there and get this. Gopher just would not have worked! As the nipper, I got tagged with giving tours since I was driving the LandCruiser and knew where everything was. With the right tour groups you could have a lot of fun, others you had to play it pretty straight. Some folks just don't deal well standing in the underground magazine surrounded by a couple tons of high explosives. :willy:

 

If the job market in the mining game wasn't so volitile, I would probably still be at it today, twenty years later.

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Chris, one of the interesting things I always found working underground was hearing the different names for things depending on the miner's work background and nationality.

 

Up here, in a hardrock mine we refer to waste rock as waste, but in our coal mines they call it gob. In coal mines here it is the "roof", in hard rock we called it the "back". Hammer drills are more commonly called jack legs from my back ground, what we called a scoop tram, others called it a LHD (load/haul/dump).

 

What kind of coal mining Chris? The first/last/only coal mine I was in did long wall advance mining. Just hearing the gob collapsing behind the roof jacks and the methane popping out of the working face was enough to convince me I was going to be a hardrock miner.:willy:

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Chris, one of the interesting things I always found working underground was hearing the different names for things depending on the miner's work background and nationality.

 

Up here, in a hardrock mine we refer to waste rock as waste, but in our coal mines they call it gob. In coal mines here it is the "roof", in hard rock we called it the "back". Hammer drills are more commonly called jack legs from my back ground, what we called a scoop tram, others called it a LHD (load/haul/dump).

 

What kind of coal mining Chris? The first/last/only coal mine I was in did long wall advance mining. Just hearing the gob collapsing behind the roof jacks and the methane popping out of the working face was enough to convince me I was going to be a hardrock miner.:willy:

 

Jim, We call the mine roof the ''top'' and what you call the scoop tram we call ''scoop'' or ''Unitrac''. And yes we are a Longwall mine. When I started in 1981 we had 2 LW's. The ''gob''still falls behind the Longwall ''Shields''.;)

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The last gold mine I worked at I found a couple nuggets about the size of my thumb, probably about 3 or 4 ounces. There were always folks driving in off the highway to see if they could buy nuggets. Had to explain to them unless they hold the mineral rights for gold mining for a plot of land it is illegal to even possess native gold. LOL

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The last gold mine I worked at I found a couple nuggets about the size of my thumb, probably about 3 or 4 ounces. There were always folks driving in off the highway to see if they could buy nuggets. Had to explain to them unless they hold the mineral rights for gold mining for a plot of land it is illegal to even possess native gold. LOL

You don't even have a souvenior?? :confused:

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