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Pad color vs. Polish


LowNslo
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I know this system is set up very easy to use! I watched Junkman's video to express how easy it was...... in his words "Dude its that easy" haha!

 

My question is one that I am sure has been asked! While looking for that perfect finish, how do you determine if an lighter pad can be used for a smaller cut, Should I stick with the method of using DS to prime the pad therefore reducing its cutting power.

 

For instance, When would it be nessecary to use the SHR on the white pad?

Would i be correct to assume that on a older car you would use this technique to cut less, (cause less damage)? I have many friends here locally that have older cars that have been treated to a show car paint job but aren't taken care of like they should be! I want to risk the least possible amount, and only work as little as possible on the surfaces that have very small swirls!

 

thanks,

Chris

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Really it's ALL trial and error and a lot comes from experience. Sometimes you can look at the paint and know what it needs.

 

Depending on the severity, I like to start out as "soft" as possible and then step up to a "harder" compound like SHR or the new green menace that's coming out.

 

You can mix a white pad with SHR but it's really trial and error. This isn't a rotary polisher so you're not removing loads of finish at a time. Take your time and experiment. I'd NOT pick a show car to experiment on though.

 

Chris

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If it were me, and FMP and the white didn't do it, I'd step right up to orange and SHR. If SHR and orange didn't do it, then I'd step up to yellow and SHR. If yellow and SHR didn't do it, and it was the future, I'd step over to a green pad and the new green menace that's being released soon. lol

 

Chris

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The best advice I can offer you is think more like like an artist and less like a accountant.

 

Detailing really doesn't have any formulas, constants, or paint by numbers type of applications. Every car is unique, every finish condition is unique, everyones technique is different, everyone will be working in unique conditions.

 

As all things from environment to the car to your technique play a role its up to you to define what is needed.

 

Junkman, myself, or even Adam can give you the rough guidelines of what to expect, and a reasonable expectation of what MIGHT work, but in the end the only way to know is to go for it.

 

Start in a 2'x2' section and experiment until you define what works best for you - beyond that its just gonna be a matter of getting a feel for things. With as many years as I have in now I can usually diagnose a finish on looks alone, but even now there are cases where I think I've got it pegged do a trial area and find out I was off by a mile LOL.

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I agree with everyone. When you start your 2x2 area pick the worst spot on the car. That way you will know if you do the same process anywhere on the car it will be perfect...or near perfect. Another tip is take you time. A perfect paint correction does happen in five minutes, or over night for that matter. I did an orange Saleen Mustang last week and it took 12 hours to buff it out. The pictures might make it look perfect, but there is still a couple scratches still in it.

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thanks for all the info! I def will use a test spot before i do any car!!!! I don't want to learn the hard way! I have been working with polishing and buffing about a year using other products but come friday I will be using the machine side of adams and just wasn't sure what to expect! Previous use of adam's was a friend of mine selling me on it haha!

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I agree with everyone. When you start your 2x2 area pick the worst spot on the car. That way you will know if you do the same process anywhere on the car it will be perfect...or near perfect. Another tip is take you time. A perfect paint correction does happen in five minutes, or over night for that matter. I did an orange Saleen Mustang last week and it took 12 hours to buff it out. The pictures might make it look perfect, but there is still a couple scratches still in it.

 

I think he means DOESN'T!!! :o

 

I spent 5 weeks on my G8, on and off this spring...

 

Chris

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