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So I wetsanded my hood


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Yep. The whole hood on my Accord. It was wrecked in 06 and the painter didn't do such a good job. It was shiny it's just that the reflection was blurry. The shop that did it said they would fix it but its my DD.

 

I went this morning to an auto body supply to get 2500 & 3000 grit sandpaper and all they had was 2500. I told him what I was doing and he said I would never be able to buff out the 3000 with the PC much less the 2500. Well he's obviously never used Adam's products. It took some time but I used the Junkman's "slow cut" method. But I did it with the yellow and the orange pads (about 4 passes each). I followed that with FMP & MSW. There are still some scratches deeper in the finish that the body shop left but at least it has a clearer reflection now.

Sorry for the long post.

I'll post before and after pics in a out an hour.

Thanks,

Len

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What is that body shop person smokin'? It's easy with the right pad and polish. I just recently finished a Chevy Tahoe that the owner took to a body shop to have some scratches removed. They gave up on it and told him he needed to have it repainted and still charged him a lot of $$$ for the work they did do. Well, I worked my magic on it and in a short amount of time, it came out perfect! I only charged him half of what the body shop did. :-)

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Pics Here

 

I've had several people in the paint and body business tell me that you can't remove swirls without a rotary. I'll admit it is probably a lot quicker with a rotary but it's also a lot more dangerous. I don't think I'm ready to go that route yet. I have used one about 21 years ago and burnt right through the paint on my 79 Chevy 4x4. It was shiny, but you could see the primer in a few places. Live and learn.

Thanks,

Len

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Yep. The whole hood on my Accord. It was wrecked in 06 and the painter didn't do such a good job. It was shiny it's just that the reflection was blurry. The shop that did it said they would fix it but its my DD.

 

I went this morning to an auto body supply to get 2500 & 3000 grit sandpaper and all they had was 2500. I told him what I was doing and he said I would never be able to buff out the 3000 with the PC much less the 2500. Well he's obviously never used Adam's products. It took some time but I used the Junkman's "slow cut" method. But I did it with the yellow and the orange pads (about 4 passes each). I followed that with FMP & MSW. There are still some scratches deeper in the finish that the body shop left but at least it has a clearer reflection now.

Sorry for the long post.

I'll post before and after pics in a out an hour.

Thanks,

Len

 

Make sure you take it back by the store and show him what the right stuff will do!

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Make sure you take it back by the store and show him what the right stuff will do!

 

I might just do that. I'm a rookie. This was my first attempt at trying to get the hood where it would have a clearer reflection. It's still not as good as factory paint but the only way to fix that is to repaint.

It's like the paint never flowed out properly before they cleared it. Anyway at least it has a little definition to the reflection now.

 

Next up tomorrow is the front fenders. and the interior and under the hood detail.

I got more goodies today. More coming Saturday and Monday.

 

Why is it everything I order ends up on special the next day? That's my luck.

 

Thanks,

Len

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:iagree:

 

I like proving people wrong. Do it! :D

 

Especially relatives that have been doing body and paint work for well over 40 years. They also said the only reason to clay is to remove overspray. If that's true then why didn't they get all the overspray off the back end when they did the work on it in 08.

 

Just got done with a wash, dry, clay, and wetsanded the front fenders (they had the same blurriness). I also wetsanded a small scratch on the decklid. Nothing like trial and error. And if I mess it up no biggie it's my DD. About to rewash then on to the PC.

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Before

Adamized

 

This is my 100,000 mile DD 06 Accord. I'm just now beginning to be satisfied with the results I get after detailing. Special thanks to Adam's.

 

Sorry, no before pics of under the hood. You can just imagine a 100,000 mile DD that had never been cleaned. My dad told me I was lying when I told him under the hood only took about 30 minutes. This APC is AMAZING!

 

Thanks,

Len

 

Oh, and Junkman would be proud. I managed to get through the entire polishing process without any buildup on the pads. Woohoo!

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Good job Len, you proved what I said in my videos about how body shop guys feel about the higher grit papers and the PC. I like to tell body shop guys that Goliath payed the ultimate price for laughing at the slingshot. He learned, albeit a tad bit too late that a tool used with the right technique can be pretty effective.

 

Now for some observations on your process. The "slow cut" technique is not for polishes of the consistency of Adam's. You ONLY use that technique with paste type products, that being a product with the consistency of Americana (by the way, you don't use that technique with waxes either). That technique was designed to use the limited power of the PC to break down and effectively use paste like compounds. Liquid polishes like all of the Adam's polishes should be used on a speed of 5 with 9-14 pounds of pressure if you are using my technique. If you are not using a paste type polish, never use the slow cut technique.

 

Secondly, always wet sand in one direction with each grit of paper. You can go in one direction with one grit and then another direction with the second grit but each grit must be done completely in one direction. I noticed in your pictures that you went in multiple directions. Don't do that as it can show up in your final results as an uneven looking paint or gouges where you went to deep in spots. Remember, the thickness of the clear will drastically affect the color you see.

 

Next, when using the PC to buff out the wet sanding damage, ALWAYS follow 2500 with 3000 grit paper. It is the 3000 grit paper that is going to undo the damage of the 2500 grit paper and make completely removing the wet sanding damage with the PC possible. If you were using a Flex or rotary, 3000 grit would not be mandatory after 2500 although I do it anyway because it makes the repair faster and easier when I start polishing.

 

Last of all, and I say this to everyone, don't try this on factory paint unless you are experienced in doing so. You were working on a panel that had been painted aftermarket so you had a cushion of clear to work with. On a factory paint job, that cushion is extremely thin and error is standing right around the corner. Anyone thinking about trying this should keep that in mind and be forewarned.

 

Those are a few things to keep in mind as you go forward. :thumbsup:

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Good job Len, you proved what I said in my videos about how body shop guys feel about the higher grit papers and the PC. I like to tell body shop guys that Goliath payed the ultimate price for laughing at the slingshot. He learned, albeit a tad bit too late that a tool used with the right technique can be pretty effective.

 

Now for some observations on your process. The "slow cut" technique is not for polishes of the consistency of Adam's. You ONLY use that technique with paste type products, that being a product with the consistency of Americana (by the way, you don't use that technique with waxes either). That technique was designed to use the limited power of the PC to break down and effectively use paste like compounds. Liquid polishes like all of the Adam's polishes should be used on a speed of 5 with 9-14 pounds of pressure if you are using my technique. If you are not using a paste type polish, never use the slow cut technique.

 

Secondly, always wet sand in one direction with each grit of paper. You can go in one direction with one grit and then another direction with the second grit but each grit must be done completely in one direction. I noticed in your pictures that you went in multiple directions. Don't do that as it can show up in your final results as an uneven looking paint or gouges where you went to deep in spots. Remember, the thickness of the clear will drastically affect the color you see.

 

Next, when using the PC to buff out the wet sanding damage, ALWAYS follow 2500 with 3000 grit paper. It is the 3000 grit paper that is going to undo the damage of the 2500 grit paper and make completely removing the wet sanding damage with the PC possible. If you were using a Flex or rotary, 3000 grit would not be mandatory after 2500 although I do it anyway because it makes the repair faster and easier when I start polishing.

 

Last of all, and I say this to everyone, don't try this on factory paint unless you are experienced in doing so. You were working on a panel that had been painted aftermarket so you had a cushion of clear to work with. On a factory paint job, that cushion is extremely thin and error is standing right around the corner. Anyone thinking about trying this should keep that in mind and be forewarned.

 

Those are a few things to keep in mind as you go forward. :thumbsup:

 

Junkman, thanks for the comments and observations.

As for the 'Slow Cut" not being used with polishes... well I guess I missed that part in the video. LOL I have to go back and watch again.

 

The sanding in one direction. That's my fault. I only had 2500 grit and the PC and Adam's to work with so I went a little nuts on the sanding. There are a few deeper scratches that didn't come out but very few.

 

Following 2500 with 3000 was my plan but there wasn't anyone in town with 3000 grit paper. I just had to make due.

 

Thanks again,

Len

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Junkman, thanks for the comments and observations.

As for the 'Slow Cut" not being used with polishes... well I guess I missed that part in the video. LOL I have to go back and watch again.

 

The sanding in one direction. That's my fault. I only had 2500 grit and the PC and Adam's to work with so I went a little nuts on the sanding. There are a few deeper scratches that didn't come out but very few.

 

Following 2500 with 3000 was my plan but there wasn't anyone in town with 3000 grit paper. I just had to make due.

 

Thanks again,

Len

 

I understand about the 3000 but you just have to order some off the web if you can't find it locally. Always go into the job with the right tools and information as this enhances your chances of success. The information about when to use the slow cut is in the thread, if not in the videos. I know I put that somewhere to clarify when to use it. You will notice a difference in your results once you implement the changes I have noted. These pictures of a Corvette door that I did show the difference:

 

carlisle2010_32.jpg

 

carlisle2010_33.jpg

 

carlisle2010_34.jpg

 

carlisle2010_35.jpg

 

carlisle2010_37.jpg

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