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SHR work time?


Robert Mac
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I have a question for you long time Adam's users. I recently switched over to Adams products and just started using the SHR and orange pad for the PC.

 

This morning, outside temp was about 55 degrees. When applying SHR with the PC, speed set at 5, it seems I had less than a minute before it became obvious the pad was drying out. I did apply a shot of DS on the pad before applying 3 nickel size drops of SHR.

 

When the pad appeared to be drying out, I added another shot or two of DS and that seemed to make the SHR come alive again. My question is.. am I taking the product beyond it's cutting time when I only add an additional shot or two of DS to the pad or should I re-apply more product on the pad when it first appears to dry out?

 

Thanks,

 

Rob

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You can 'wake up' the solids from within the pad surface with a spritz of DS. Sometimes when it is warm out, the product drying can happen kind of fast, so I stop the pad, and give it a single half spritz of detail spray and return to polishing. It does wake up the polish (solids on the pad) and they will continue to work on the finish.

 

I would only use 3 pea sized drops (yes, that's all it takes) of SHR on the orange pad per 2'x2' area - sounds crazy, but with this stuff, too much product clogs the pad and slows down the correction.

 

Also if it is a bit warm, or really dry out, make sure to keep your polishing area at about 2'x2', otherwise if the area is larger it is drying out before you get to work the polish enough. If you move the pad too fast across the paint(in an effort to keep it moist), you are not getting in a lot of correction. Small and slow.

 

Maybe some of the hot climate state guys can chime in with their more extensive experience on fast drying product.

Edited by Doug123
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When I first start I use 1 shot of DS to prime the pad then use 3 or 4 drops about the size of your finger nail. Usually after going for some time the pads start to create a "dusting" usually with the Hex pads for the PC that is just dry product around the edges.

 

Is that what you are referring to?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Thanks Doug. I'm just a few hours north of you in Ventura. About an hour north of Los Angeles so we should experience similar (mostly mild) weather.

 

Jason, I do see some dusting but what I am experiencing is the product no longer appearing "wet" as I move the pad over the area I'm working. After working the area for about a minute, the product has hazed over and no longer has that wet appearance.

 

Thanks,

 

Rob

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Thanks Doug. I'm just a few hours north of you in Ventura. About an hour north of Los Angeles so we should experience similar (mostly mild) weather.

 

Jason, I do see some dusting but what I am experiencing is the product no longer appearing "wet" as I move the pad over the area I'm working. After working the area for about a minute, the product has hazed over and no longer has that wet appearance.

 

Thanks,

 

Rob

 

Rob, when the product changes it's color/look, it will go from a kind of milky look to a transparent look, kind of like a thin layer of vaseline (Thanks AJ). I believed Dylan referred to this transition as when the polish 'flashes'.

 

After it goes translucent(flashes), continue to work the product - it's not done yet. Keep working it in it's clear/greasy looking state until it fades out a lot, but not completely. You can continue to work it down to a faint haze. Then wipe it off and admire your results. You will notice that the reflection of the work light is very clear, with not much of a halo around the light in the reflection.

 

I just discovered this technique within the last month watching Dylan do his stuff at a local clinic and it works much better. I was stopping too soon after the 'flash point'.

 

If you want, you can test this out. Put a line of blue or green painters tape down an area of the hood, and do your current technique on one side (and stop where you normally would) and then try working the SHR down farther on the other side of the tape and then compare the results. (Thanks Ryan :thumbsup:).

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Robert, I was having the same issue last week with the SHR except I use using a Flex. The temperature was in the upper 40's when I was doing it. The only thing I can think of that was causing this would be the humidity in the air. This summer I never had an issue with it, but as soon as fall hit the products started acting different.

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Thanks for the replys everyone. I've watched alot of Junkmans videos but not the ones that explain his slowcut method. I'll take the time to watch those. I need to get out there and continue to use the products so I can become more familiar with how they work. It sounds like adding DS to the pad is normal, and I'm ok with that. Everyone has been very helpful and Doug, I'm going to give your suggestion a try as well. I'm hoping maybe in the spring to get to a local clinic if they have one somewhere close to me.

 

Rob.

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