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Laminate vinyl flooring


crowvet
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I have a rental house that I would like to install a vinyl/laminate wood flooring in. It is in a kitchen area, so I do not want real wood as I hear it is not very good if it gets wet. I like the plank style floating flooring that either snaps together or has a stick/bonding strip to connect two pieces together. There are a bazillion different articles and types on the internet, so many it is confusing. Has anyone here installed these or have any recommendations or warnings?:cheers:

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I've used the style that has a stick/bonding strip in my kitchen,I like it. It was easy to install and i thought it was good quality ,The product i used was (Allure).One thing about it is once your ready to stick a piece down make darn sure its in the right place ,Because you only got one shot at it,No taking it off after in one piece,They stick together real good.

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Our family room has floating laminate flooring and I also re-did all our [three] bathrooms and laundry room in the stick-down square vinyl tile.

 

The tile-like vinyl flooring is super easy.... just make sure you work from the center out or it'll throw everything off when completed [i speak from experience]. Looks great and has very good longevity not to mention it's super easy to clean/wipe..... just doesn't like excess water spills or it will lift so wipe any spills imediately..... and caulk well on the corners if you use it in areas likely to see water. I used additional 3M spray adhesive and it has held up great over the last 18-months. Pre-planning and preperation is everything!

 

Floating, snap-together flooring is almost as easy to install and much better all-round.

 

Holds up very, very well, is very forgiving to dropped objects [though will chip if excessive], super easy to clean [Tip: I use THIS steam cleaner with Adam's Window Cleaner and distilled water mixed half-n-half in the tank, no streaks! Just make sure you empty the tank following each use], wears great [logevity] and some of the flooring now available looks very close to "real" wood. The underlay padding is the key to a surface that is pleasant to walk on and absorbs impacts. Don't skimp here and get quality padding, you'll be gald you did so. Again, pre-planning and preperation is everything, so take your time and do it right.... the first time

 

I highly recommend both methods.

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laminate wood flooring isn't suppose to get wet either. I had some in my old house's kitchen and the fridge leaked from the water ice machine hook up and swelled up the floor around it.

 

This is the advantage of laminate snap-together flooring.

 

You can replace a section or two or three....

 

Try doing that with hard-wood flooring.

 

PS: Make sure you order an extra box and/or pieces of the style/color you pick. Laminate flooring changes colors and styles like nothing I've seen, so something you purchased [just] last year will [most likely] not be available any more. I learnt this the hard way, sadly.

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I have a rental house that I would like to install a vinyl/laminate wood flooring in. It is in a kitchen area, so I do not want real wood as I hear it is not very good if it gets wet. I like the plank style floating flooring that either snaps together or has a stick/bonding strip to connect two pieces together. There are a bazillion different articles and types on the internet, so many it is confusing. Has anyone here installed these or have any recommendations or warnings?:cheers:

 

I would not install a wood type of product in a rental property, especially in a kitchen. If the flooring can be damaged by water, I wouldn't put it in the kitchen.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The floor looks nice, by looking at the pictures. I noticed you did it right and removed the baseboards to.

 

My brother bought a house and we ended up gutting the whole basement, the bathrooms, and kitchen. Only one family had lived there and the house was about 10 years old, but it was so sloppy. Quarter inch gaps around the outer flooring edges, and the basement nothing was square and he was trying to wire it all on a 20 amp circuit instead of putting in a sub panel.

 

For me doing home repair is just as relaxing as detailing cars.

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The floor looks nice, by looking at the pictures. I noticed you did it right and removed the baseboards to.

 

My brother bought a house and we ended up gutting the whole basement, the bathrooms, and kitchen. Only one family had lived there and the house was about 10 years old, but it was so sloppy. Quarter inch gaps around the outer flooring edges, and the basement nothing was square and he was trying to wire it all on a 20 amp circuit instead of putting in a sub panel.

 

For me doing home repair is just as relaxing as detailing cars.

 

Thanks, I actually sheeted the whole floor with 1/4 inch smooth plywood first. I had to remove the base boards and cut all the entry ways up for clearance and cut a little off the door bottom. It is coming out nice though. I am not experienced at all on home repair, I did this job in my head about a hundred times. It was easier to do than it was for me to figure out how to do it. I am a bit OCD and had to know how it would lay out before I started. I am Happy with it.

P1010646.jpg

Edited by crowvet
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I have Alloc laminate in my kitchen. Put it in about 4 years ago, and the flooring company I bought it from no longer sells it. He saw mine and couldn't believe that it was 4 years old because it still looks brand new. BUT it takes a lot more work. My wife will dry mop it with a dry Swiffer pad first, then she gets on her hands and knees and cleans it with diluted Simple Green and dries it immediately with a towel so that it never gets wet. It has a lifetime guarantee on it, but it's like anything that is laminated. If wetness seeps in, it's going to curl. So you have to be careful. We've had vinyl in the past and that stuff yellows over time and costs more than the laminate. But there aren't a lot of good choices when it comes to a kitchen floor.

Tile.......too cold and you have mildew in the grout

Vinyl......expensive and it yellows

Laminate......requires careful maintenance and can't be wet mopped

Wood.......warps.

Carpet.............just NO.

Is there anything left?

Go with what you like. :cheers:

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Thanks, I actually sheeted the whole floor with 1/4 inch smooth plywood first. I had to remove the base boards and cut all the entry ways up for clearance and cut a little off the door bottom. It is coming out nice though. I am not experienced at all on home repair, I did this job in my head about a hundred times. It was easier to do than it was for me to figure out how to do it. I am a bit OCD and had to know how it would lay out before I started. I am Happy with it.

P1010646.jpg

 

 

None of it is Rocket Science. Home repair it's self is fairly easy, people are just intimidated by it. So in turn they hire someone that charges them a grundle of money and the contractor usually doesn't care about the end result, cause it isn't their home. I by no means am an expert but should anyone have any questions on here I will be more than happy to share all my tips and tricks. I did build my own home from the ground up 12 years ago. I don't think I could do it again while working the hours that I do, along with getting older. A lot of times contractors don't want you to know how easy some things can be and won't share any advice. Patience is the biggest key, along with taking your time.

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None of it is Rocket Science. Home repair it's self is fairly easy, people are just intimidated by it. So in turn they hire someone that charges them a grundle of money and the contractor usually doesn't care about the end result, cause it isn't their home. I by no means am an expert but should anyone have any questions on here I will be more than happy to share all my tips and tricks. I did build my own home from the ground up 12 years ago. I don't think I could do it again while working the hours that I do, along with getting older. A lot of times contractors don't want you to know how easy some things can be and won't share any advice. Patience is the biggest key, along with taking your time.

 

This is why I do it myself, because every time I have hired a contractor I have experienced this exact scenario.

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