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My first 7424 Detail


bceagleace

Question

All - I'm new to the forum and I got my huge Adams order about a week ago. I've been dying to use the 7424 on my new 2SS Camaro!

 

Yesterday was finally the day, so I wanted to post some results and notes on my newbie experience. Any critiques are welcomed. Hopefully some other first timers can learn something.

 

Process:

 

I started out with a two-bucket wash in my driveway. I then pulled into the garage and clayed and with detail spray. Claying wasn't bad and the detail spray smells good. I recommend having music going! After claying, I did another two bucket wash in the garage itself. Finally, I dried the car with my leafblower. This process alone took over two hours!

 

Next, after waching the Junkman videos and Adam's vids about 100 times, I put the orange pad on my PC, spritzed with detail spray, put a few good pea sized drops of orange product on, and I began on a small section of the hood. I did the whole car with orange, working in ~1.5 x ~1.5 sections. I wiped the residue off with a microfiber after completing each section. I then moved onto the Fine Machine Polish. This went on much more easily and it "flashed" more quickly then the Swirl and Haze Remover. Finally, I did the machine superwax.

 

I wiped in after applications of all products, except the Super Wax (I waited until I was done with the whole car). I was doing it in my garage, and even though well lit, when I pulled into the driveway this morning, I could see hazy spots all over the place, especially around the trim, seams and badging. I plan to go back over that with detail spray and a microfiber later today.

 

What I learned:

 

1) This takes time! Being my first time, I had no idea how long this process would take. Just getting the car ready for polish is a 2+ hour job! In the future, I'm going to break this up over a couple of days. I'll get a good car cover and do half one day, cover the car in the garage for the night, and do the next half after.

 

2) Get the right supplies - good hoses, quick releases, a stool or something to sit on for down low areas, and a wheeled car are ESSENTIAL! You will be miserable if you are bending over, constantly having to find a spot to put your polish or detail spray, etc. Quality supplies/products help get the job done right.

 

3) Have lots of detail spray! I used almost an entire 16oz bottle on this one detailing. Can't have too much of this stuff!

 

4) DON'T RUSH - I found myself getting a bit sloppy or moving too quickly through a couple sections... don't! Just take a break and go back at it. You won't get the right results if you rush through

 

5) Have plenty of microfiber towels - I have 2 double softs, and 2 regulars, and I had to do a wash mid way through. You can't have enough of these things. As soon as they start to get caked up, you need to get a new one. I just ordered several more.

 

Questions:

 

1) I did get some polish around the badging. The "Camaro" pic below shows where some polish got in between the lettering. Any advice on getting this out?

 

2) For black cars specifically, anybody use anything specific on top of Super Wax to make it look better?

 

3) I found some scratches that weren't visible before/during my polishing. How do I know if these require wet sanding, and should I attempt this on my own?

 

Results:

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that in addition to I dont think your cover is the Superweave material judging by how it folds.

 

Nope, I think it is worse. It's made out of stuff that feels like a parachute. Very light and floaty, and slick as snot. With my paint being as slick as it is, that thing will slide right or left if you don't do it just right.

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Junkman - I'm building a new house right now. Are there any residential or commercial air systems that I could put in which would reduce the dust in a garage? I already know that the garage will be heated, and the house will have hydro air with a HEPA filtration system (child has allergies), but will this be sufficient to hook up for the garage as well? Should I talk to someone who specializes in custom garages?

 

Cool! Good luck with the new house project. Would love to hear how your house comes along through the process. :lurk:

 

I am no expert in custom garages but in the past did have a house custom built and did a couple things which helped on that garage... wish I still had that garage now!

 

From my personal experience here is what I would recommend for reducing dust in the garage (for winter use)

1) Be sure the weather stripping around the doors makes a good seal and you maintain it well to keep the rubber/vinyl soft and flexible. Air blowing in will bring lots of dust with it.

2) Consider using radiant floor heat in the garage instead of forced air. Forced air is good for quickly changing the temps but it will move air which will stir up any dust that came in when the overhead doors were opened. Forced air units are appropriate when you want to quickly change the temp of the room (like commercial auto shops that frequently open the doors letting cold air come in). Radiant floor heat makes the floor nicer to sit or kneel on and won't be stirring up dust with fast air movement. The down side to radiant floor heat is that room temps are not quickly changed. Radiant floor heat is more efficient and cheaper to run and it is what I used in the past when I lived in northern Illinois. Loved it.

 

The other down side to radiant floor heat is that it is of no use for cooling during the summer months.

 

Hope this helps!

 

Look forward to hearing how your project comes along!

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Thanks Dave - happy to share some details on the house. It has been very cool to bring the plans together, and I feel really fortunate to be able to build it.

 

I agree that radiant is probably right. The hydro air system we have for the house is suppossed to put less dry air into the house, and the filter is going to eliminate normal particulates that are bad fro allergies. What this means for general dust, or the kind of dust that might settle on cars, I have no idea.

 

I'll definitely ask about the garage doors. The builder knows I want it heated, so is suppossed to be using sufficient insultation, but I'll probably find someone who knows this stuff locally to consult.

 

OK, now that I'm going crazy on the detailing stuff, what would you guys put into a new garage if you were starting from scratch? So far, I'm going to heat it, put in floor drains, and have lots of built in storage. I'm going to put in a industrial type sink. What about a hose that is on a swivel in the ceiling? That might be cool for my own detailing efforts. Anything else? I have a blank slate here!

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OK, now that I'm going crazy on the detailing stuff, what would you guys put into a new garage if you were starting from scratch? So far, I'm going to heat it, put in floor drains, and have lots of built in storage. I'm going to put in a industrial type sink. What about a hose that is on a swivel in the ceiling? That might be cool for my own detailing efforts. Anything else? I have a blank slate here!

 

Well I can help here. Here's you list:

 

1. PLENTY OF LIGHTING. You want to be able to not only see the top of the cars, you want to be able to see the sides too. Very important.

 

2. A ton of outlets. You want to be able to plug into power from different points in the garage. HOWEVER, you must have isolated circuits so that you don't overload one circuit with too much stuff. Also, make sure you have at least one 20 or 30 amp outlet on each side of the garage. Power distribution is very important when laying out the electrical so that you distribute the supply evenly and can manage your demand without overloading one circuit. Also, put your recepticals up high so that you don't have to worry about water hitting down low in the garage.

 

3. Some type of water-proofing that goes at least 5 feet up the wall from the ground. Obviously, this allows you to get hapless when rinsing your cars down.

 

4. An exhaust outlet, like what you see in the body shops. This will allow you to stuff a hose on your car's tail pipe and vent the exhaust outdoors. That way, you can run the engine with the doors shut in the middle of winter. Great for assisting with drying the engine after washing it, as well as working on the car when the engine needs to be running. You can also get the car toasty with your remote start in the winter.

 

5. (Optional) A refrigerator full of Welch's grape juice just in case I come by. :D

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Junkman - after watching what you did with dave's Lamborghini, I may have to fly you out too! I will PLENTY of welch's grape nice on hand!

 

Great recommendations, particularly on lighting, which I had not really thought about. Is there any specific lighting you'd recommend?

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With lighting, I have not seen any difference between any of them when it comes to seeing swirls. I can see swirls with a Bic lighter of a prison search light. It is all in knowing how to look at the paint. With that said, I will recommend that you get the brightest type of lighting that you can find, but section off the lighting so that you can only turn on the amount of lighting that you need. Also, have your lighting separated by stalls. There is no need to light up every stall when you're only working in one.

 

For me, I would set mine up this way. The switch by the door in which I enter the garage would turn on some regular garage lighting that illuminated the garage in a manner that would allow me to see everything at a glance. This lighting won't be all that bright, just enough to give me a good view of the entire garage.

 

My next outlet would be a dual switch over each bay. One switch would put plenty of light over the car and the next would double it.

 

My last switch would illuminate the light on the sides of the walls. This would eliminate the need for halogen stands, which you have to constantly adjust as you go around the car.

 

That's how I would roll! As for bringing me up to you, all you have to do is make it happen and have the grape juice ready. :thumbsup:

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Please keep in mind that some of the Covers Covercraft sells are next to imposible to put on and take off using the junkman method. I have the weathershield HP and the material is for lack of a better word slippery as hell there is no way to fold it and have it stay folded. It will slip and slide.

The Weathersheild HP is made from the superweave material i believe.

 

Just FYI.

 

 

 

You almost got it right, but this is the correct statement: Covering a dusty or dirty car introduces the possibility of scratches. Covering a clean car properly is not a problem. A car is only clean at one time: right after you wash it. If it is driven one block, it is now dirty, or at least dusty again. If you don't believe me, buy a black car and try it. You'll quickly become a believer.

 

 

 

Yes. That's what this thread is all about. As for how to put the cover on, that's what this thread is all about.

 

 

 

Adam's doesn't sell any car covers but Covercraft does and they are made in America. If you look at the chart that I posted in the car cover selection thread, you'll be able to choose from the many types of covers that they sell, one that meets the criteria you are looking for.

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Please keep in mind that some of the Covers Covercraft sells are next to imposible to put on and take off using the junkman method. I have the weathershield HP and the material is for lack of a better word slippery there is no way to fold it and have it stay folded. It will slip and slide.

The Weathersheild HP is made from the superweave material i believe.

 

Just FYI.

 

:iagree:

 

I use a method on the vette similar to Junkman's technique but the method is only close to his technique because my bride's vette is a convertible with that cloth/rag top. If the car top was a smooth finish our cover would never stay on the car while walking around to fold it up on top of the car or unfold it. It is an easier job done with two people with this slippery material, though we have learned to do it with just one person, but it took some practice.

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That is exactly my issue, i have to hook on to side mirrors then roll out to hood and rear. Folding will never work with superweave.

 

:iagree:

 

I use a method on the vette similar to Junkman's technique but the method is only close to his technique because my bride's vette is a convertible with that cloth/rag top. If the car top was a smooth finish our cover would never stay on the car while walking around to fold it up on top of the car or unfold it. It is an easier job done with two people with this slippery material, though we have learned to do it with just one person, but it took some practice.

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Nice work for your virgin voyage. On a black car, nothing beats the brilliant glaze + Americana combo on top of what you've already applied!

 

I'm going to start on a 2000 silverado(255,000 miles) lots of scratches

and swirls. Haven't ordered a kit yet--PC or Flex I have 2 other

Late model trucks to do next. What do you think

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I'm going to start on a 2000 silverado(255,000 miles) lots of scratches

and swirls. Haven't ordered a kit yet--PC or Flex I have 2 other

Late model trucks to do next. What do you think

 

I got the PC earlier this year and after getting a chance to use the Flex at Turkey Run last weekend I just ordered a Flex. I think the PC is a great way to start, I don't regret getting it even though I am getting a Flex now.

 

The PC takes longer (more passes), but its lack of aggressiveness is also a benefit, especially when starting out. It is much more difficult to do any damage with a PC. And if you later want a Flex the PC can still be used with the 4" pads, applying machine super sealant and removing the haze after the sealant (or for getting an arm workout if you miss the vibrations :willy:)

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I got the PC earlier this year and after getting a chance to use the Flex at Turkey Run last weekend I just ordered a Flex. I think the PC is a great way to start, I don't regret getting it even though I am getting a Flex now.

 

The PC takes longer (more passes), but its lack of aggressiveness is also a benefit, especially when starting out. It is much more difficult to do any damage with a PC. And if you later want a Flex the PC can still be used with the 4" pads, applying machine super sealant and removing the haze after the sealant (or for getting an arm workout if you miss the vibrations :willy:)

 

Once your paint is fixed, there is no need to keep hitting it with the Flex unless you are constantly touching the paint wrong and creating more heavy damage. Once your paint has been fully corrected, the PC along with FMP is all you should ever need to maintain it.

 

That's what the Junkman suggested. I may order

the green pad & extreme swirl remover along

with the PC kit

 

The PC kits all come with SSR. :cheers:

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Once your paint is fixed, there is no need to keep hitting it with the Flex unless you are constantly touching the paint wrong and creating more heavy damage. Once your paint has been fully corrected, the PC along with FMP is all you should ever need to maintain it.

 

I understand what you are saying. The touch ups don't take very long with the PC (depending on which car it is and its clear coat hardness), it is the initial corrections that take more time that I want to shorten. I am not only doing my three vehicles but also friends, neighbors and anyone who is willing to part with their money... :2thumbs:

 

And yes, with a couple cars living outside and having a family - some scratches and swirls do happen more often than I would like to see... so I have to work more to keep the the paint looking its best.

 

:cheers:

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Thanks Dave - happy to share some details on the house. It has been very cool to bring the plans together, and I feel really fortunate to be able to build it.

 

I agree that radiant is probably right. The hydro air system we have for the house is suppossed to put less dry air into the house, and the filter is going to eliminate normal particulates that are bad fro allergies. What this means for general dust, or the kind of dust that might settle on cars, I have no idea.

 

I'll definitely ask about the garage doors. The builder knows I want it heated, so is suppossed to be using sufficient insultation, but I'll probably find someone who knows this stuff locally to consult.

 

OK, now that I'm going crazy on the detailing stuff, what would you guys put into a new garage if you were starting from scratch? So far, I'm going to heat it, put in floor drains, and have lots of built in storage. I'm going to put in a industrial type sink. What about a hose that is on a swivel in the ceiling? That might be cool for my own detailing efforts. Anything else? I have a blank slate here!

 

On top of what Junkman covered in post # 26, if at all possible I would have the garage built to accept a lift sufficient to stack a car. Makes me want to build a house/garge or add a garage....

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Well I can help here. Here's you list:

 

1. PLENTY OF LIGHTING. You want to be able to not only see the top of the cars, you want to be able to see the sides too. Very important.

 

2. A ton of outlets. You want to be able to plug into power from different points in the garage. HOWEVER, you must have isolated circuits so that you don't overload one circuit with too much stuff. Also, make sure you have at least one 20 or 30 amp outlet on each side of the garage. Power distribution is very important when laying out the electrical so that you distribute the supply evenly and can manage your demand without overloading one circuit. Also, put your recepticals up high so that you don't have to worry about water hitting down low in the garage.

 

3. Some type of water-proofing that goes at least 5 feet up the wall from the ground. Obviously, this allows you to get hapless when rinsing your cars down.

 

4. An exhaust outlet, like what you see in the body shops. This will allow you to stuff a hose on your car's tail pipe and vent the exhaust outdoors. That way, you can run the engine with the doors shut in the middle of winter. Great for assisting with drying the engine after washing it, as well as working on the car when the engine needs to be running. You can also get the car toasty with your remote start in the winter.

 

5. (Optional) A refrigerator full of Welch's grape juice just in case I come by. :D

 

:drool: Oooh, my kingdom for a garage like this, plus:

-automotive lift:

Car Lifts for home garage - Backyard Buddy 4 Post Free Standing Automotive Lifts-Residential

 

-protected and draining floors:

Garage Flooring | Garage Tiles | Garage Floors | Garage Floor Mats | RaceDeck

 

-plenty of cabinets, worksurfaces, hooks/etc, and carts:

GCO, Stack-On - Stack-On Cadet Garage Storage 10-Piece Set #10-Piece

GCO, NewAge VersaTrac,

http://www.adamspolishes.com/p-605-adams-pro-detailers-cart.aspx

http://www.adamspolishes.com/p-671-adams-rolling-detail-seat.aspx

 

-garage refrigerator:

GARF19XXVK Gladiator 19.0 cu. ft. Garage Refrigerator

 

-garage LCD tv with swivel tv mount

Amazon.com: Samsung LN-S4095D 40-Inch 1080p LCD HDTV: Electronics

Amazon.com: VideoSecu TV Wall Mount for Most 32"- 55" LCD LED Plasma TV Flat Screen, Full Motion Dual Arm Articulating Mount bracket with Free HDMI Cable MW360B 1SR: Electronics

 

 

 

And then I woke up.....

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Once your paint is fixed, there is no need to keep hitting it with the Flex unless you are constantly touching the paint wrong and creating more heavy damage. Once your paint has been fully corrected, the PC along with FMP is all you should ever need to maintain it.

 

 

 

The PC kits all come with SSR. :cheers:

 

Actually, your kit does not come the green pad or the SSR polish.

 

I ordered the junkman PC kit and added the 4" focus pads, green PC pad and SSR. Provided great results.

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Any good vids or resources in the forums on interior detailing? i know that the junkman and other stuff I've found covers mostly exterior stuff and paint correction. Any suggestions are welcomed.

 

Check the videos from the Adam's DVD - Instructional Detailing Videos. They show working with all the products.

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Looks nice.

 

I am new to this too and don't know the best way to get the polish out from around the badges, but from other suggestions I plan to tape up my Mini when it comes time for it to be polished. My wife's Lexus has almost no badges or trim so I don't have this trouble in the times I have polished it.

 

I know sometimes if I try and do too much at one time it can become un-fun but at the end the results make it worth it. You didn't say in your post, were you happy with the results overall?

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