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Chevy TPMS help (nitrogen)


ExpressThis13

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OK so as you guys know I now have a silverado and its been getting cold out and my TPMS has been telling me I have a low tire so today I went and got some lunch probably 15 minutes of driving so after I ate I went outside to fill up all tires and get them matching all around. So I have a slime tire gauge with a bleeder valve (bought back in 07ish when I had my SS) and has been working fine on all my vehicles well this is my first TPMS vehicle so I put the gauge up to the valve and it reads 24.....WTH my truck says its at 31 (recommended is 35) so I start filling with air and keep in mind the dealership said they refilled it with nitrogen but I do not believe it and I am not going to put nitrogen in it as I have a good air compressor at home thats free. According to my gauge when I hit 34 my truck said 42 PSI.....At this point I am getting frustated so I start bleeding it until I get my truck to say 36 with equaled out to be about 27 on my gauge. So I then proceed to get all my tires matching well once I got them all the same according to my gauge I check the truck and here is what I got.

FL 35

FR 36

RL 34

RR 39

 

So I have no Idea what to do now. Should I trust my truck or my gauge. Its because of this crap number 1 I hate TPMS I am not car illeterate I check my fluids and tires often I dont need a freakin computer telling me something is wrong and 2 I do not like nitrogen.

My tires do not look low like they did before but when I filled up to 35 according to my gauge it seemed to be too much.

Please help.

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Do you have another tire gauge you can use to compare the pressures?

 

I have never had issues with TPMS being inaccurate. Never had issues with nitrogen causing an issue either.

 

Hope you can figure out what isn't measuring correctly.

 

:cheers:

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Ok so I just went found a nice stick slider type gauge and I got about 35 on 2 passenger tires and about 34 on my driver side 2 so I guess my gauge is jacked up. I will be keeping this nice slider one I found around for future use. I guess my slime either is not capable of reading nitrogen is broken. Thanks for the idea so I guess my TPMS is not as far off as I originally thought.

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I only have those sliding stick gages. I could compare them just to see I guess.

 

I have the same slime gage and has worked well for many years. the stick gages are not very accurate. I'd get another and check if they agree.

My TPMS light went on after installing the winter tires, I reset the TPMS system and seems good to go.

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In my dads outlook his tpms was acting up saying all his tires were low. I checked them and they were all fine. He brought it into the dealership and there was a problem with the sensors. Bring it in and have them check the sensors, or reprogram them.

 

:iagree: Not sure about yours, but my TPMS can be reprogrammed by the driver from the center console. When I got new tires, I had to do this, no biggie. Perhaps something got out of whack. Read the manual.

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:iagree: Not sure about yours, but my TPMS can be reprogrammed by the driver from the center console. When I got new tires, I had to do this, no biggie. Perhaps something got out of whack. Read the manual.

 

Yea but im sure yours was on an AUDI, my dads truck is a SATURN :lolsmack: . Yours car is in another level of technology compared to Saturn.

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i know in audis and in my mini that i go around the car with a mechanical gauge, make sure they are even and then reset the TPMS from the DIC. when my dad had an avalanche there was an area to reset the TPMS, im sure yours is too.

 

Once recalibrated they all read the same and should be accurate within 1psi. They are atleast on my mini/audi

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On my g8 the sensors read within a pound of a good gauge. For a while I thought they were off because I had a "good" aka expensive dial gauge. I double checked one day with a couple of stick gauges and they were all the same and agreed with the sensors. Now I use them. Also many of the complicated gauges are very sensitive to being dropped and banged around.

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In my experience, most TPMS systems are only accurate to +/- 2 psi or so. They are mainly looking for pressure to fall below a certain threshold at which point they provide a warning - they are not intended to be a Formula One type of info/telemetry system.

 

The sliding stick type gauges are basically give-a-way items mostly used for promotion (Yokohama, Falken, etc.). They are worth what you typically pay for them (I've never paid for one in my life).

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Eric I would suggest you check your tires first thing in the morning, before you have driven the truck. If you have driven the vehicle you are not going to get a really accurate reading with a gauge. Several factors can contribute to inconsistent reading. Having 2 tires in direct sunlight and 2 tires in the shade can make pressure difference in readings. As for the nitrogen in the tires, air is approximately 78% nitrogen. I have had nitrogen installed in new tires when I bought them and have run normal air, I couldn't tell a difference. I know NASCAR and Indy and Formula One uses Nitrogen in tires, but my vehicles don't do 200 miles an hour. These guys use nitrogen because they can get more consistent air pressures. Pure nitrogen don't expand as much as normal air in high temps. As for the gauge not reading nitrogen, you gauge don't care if its methane gas in the tires, it reads the pressure leaving the valve stem. I have a digital gauge and a sliding stick gauge. I was told by a tire dealer who had been doing it for 40 years, the way to get an accurate reading with a stick gauge is to hold the gauge to where you have the slide facing up, this way gravity won't pull it down farther. I generally use the digital gauge then will follow up with the sliding stick gauge. BTW how old are the TPMS monitors in your truck? Condensation could have gotten in your tires and made them less accurate, or the batteries may be running down in the sensors. IMHO until you get a low air alarm, don't pay attention to the TPMS reading in the cab. I hope this helps.

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