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HELP !! Shutoff Valve Removal


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OKAY, I give up! I have 2 Shutoff Valves that have been returned to me due to not being able to get them off the hose.

 

I have tried WD40, PB, 2 18" wrenches, and I can not get these things to break loose. I set these both up for a customer, and personally know they were only put on hand tight, then checked for leaks, and left alone. I really feel like I am dealing with Galvanic Corrosion between the 2.

 

Does anyone have any ideas ? This has become a quest. I am lost for ideas.

 

:lolsmack:

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It is most likely galvanic corrosion. Since the Adam's shutoff is aluminum, if the hose ends were brass and it was installed and left on the hose, it is most likely is galvanic corrosion due to the dissimilar metals. Aluminum on Brass is notorious for forming corrosion between them and quickly at that. It might help to put a light coat of anti-seize on the hose ends, if they are indeed brass, before installing the shut-off valve.

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interesting. I havent sold any QD's just shut off valves and fire hose sprayers...

 

edit... seeing those pics you posted just now I havent seen that happen at all actually in the 12 or more I've sold. I will check with some of my dads hoses at the office and see if thats happened. Id almost think those would be treated in some way or another on the inside threads.

Edited by Faze
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I think Jim hit the nail on the head with the corrosion, it's the only thing looking at your picture that would cause that. 2 18" wrenches, WOW...that's some serious force man. Two options come to mind.

 

1. If your looking to send them back, I would just pack them up as is, so the Adam's gang can see the issue for future reference.

 

2. If you are hell bent on seperating the two...

 

a. Put the hose ends in a vice, and crush the brass fittings down enough to pull it out.

 

b. Propane torch...not enough to melt the dang fittings or cause a fire, but just enough to break up the corrosion. It will be warm :)

 

c. Let soak overnight in a penetrating oil/CLR type product

 

d. If you have (most likely not) an easy out...go from the rubber hose end and take it out from the back

 

Just a few ideas that come to mind...good luck.

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Sorry, no idea how you can get them off at this point and them still be usable. The aluminum shutoff valve is untreated so it has no protection against the corrosion between it and the hose it's installed on.

 

Frequently removing it from the hose and or treating it with some anti-seize will help prevent that permanent bond that is caused by the corrosion.

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Thanks for all of the input guys. I think its best if I get these back to Dylan and Adam to do proper research on them before I destroy what could help a lot of our customers.

 

Ding, ding...that's what I would do. :)

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I know that valve is made in brass as well! That may be an alternative Adams needs to look at.

 

I have two of the aluminum ones and honestly, I've NEVER removed them. I have QD's on everything so I don't have to remove them.

 

Soak them in CLR or Lime Away for a couple of days... That may help... If you use heat, remove the plastic parts first.

 

Chris

Edited by Chewy
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Wow!

 

I haven't had that happen, but then I don't leave my QD outside on the hose but instead put it on and take if off each time I wash the car. That nozzle setup is too expensive for me to leave it outside for kids to take or to have age in the Florida sun.

 

:lurk:

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the hard water of houston is what caused this. if you live in an area with brackish water, use anti-seize or plumbers tape, no matter what the material is!

 

San Antonio has some pretty hardwater in some areas. I had my dad check the ones at the office. But they were taken. A**hole workers... Smh...

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Well I can't help you get them off but No-Ox will help keep this from happening. I have been using it for years in my electronics days. It is an anti-corrosion compound we would put between the copper grounding straps and the galvonized steel towers. It is designed to act like a barrior between dissimilar metals to prevent galvonic corrosion. I would bet that is what is happening.

 

Brass is cathodic (-0.4) and aluminum is anodic (-0.95) and the hard water is your electrolyte. The brass and the aluminum are reacting with the minerals in the water to essentailly create a battery. Hence, corrosion. I would be curious to see if there was a measurable DC current between the two metals.

 

Using a no-ox type of product would be a good idea where you have hard water. You may also consider using teflon tape between the two metals.

 

Corrosion Protection-Rust Preventatives-Block Corrosion-Prevent Rust

Edited by dipolley
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the hard water of houston is what caused this. if you live in an area with brackish water, use anti-seize or plumbers tape, no matter what the material is!

 

Yup...if it has any salt/sodium in it, it will just accelerate the corrosive process even more with these two dissimilar metals.

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Hey Rich, I am super curious. If you have a volt meter can you dunk them in some water (preferably the same source of water that caused this) and put your meter on the lowest setting for direct currect (DC)? Dry the outside of the items. Then, place one lead on the brass and one on the aluminum and see if there is any voltage. It will be a very very low number if anything at all.

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Here is what I would try. Go to your local auto parts store and pick up something similair to this. Not WD40. That stuff IMHO is good for nothing. Spray it good and let it set for a while, even over night. Make sure that it gets a good saturation. Take that Aluminum part and put it in a bench vise with the hose end up and then have at it with a good pair of pliers, small pipe wrench, or vise grips. If you use vise grips be careful so that you don't make it so tight that you collapse the fitting.

 

K & W Knock'er® Loose 1724 - Lubricant Penetrant | O'Reilly Auto Parts

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So I had something exactly like this happen to me today. My kid had put a sprayer on the hose in the backyard and left it there for who knows how long. It was one of those 10 different spray pattern sprayers. I tried to take it off and it was on there tight. I had a product called "the original rust eater penetrating spray". I sprayed it and let it sit for about an hour upside down so the spray would run into the nozzle if that makes sense. I then got my kid to hold the hose with a pair of channel locks and I was able to twist it off. You could see where the spray was breaking the corrosion down and turning it into a jelly like substance. If I would have let it sit longer Iam sure I would have been able to twist it off by hand.

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