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Need some help with my PC/New


Gotallofthem
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Alright, I'm hoping someone here can give me a hand.

 

So I just used my PCXP yesterday for the first time. I had attached the 4" adapter and plate, to use the pads.

 

So I went ahead to try and put the large pad on and I can not get this adapter off.

Now before anyone goes ahead and posts: Yes I did find this previous thread.

http://www.adamsforums.com/forums/machine-polishing/12447-2.htm

 

I'm not sure even if the op managed to fix his.

 

Here is the Deal: The backing 4"inch plate is off. However, when I try to remove the Screw/Adapter, (the one that I simply put in by hand and didn't even lock in hard).

 

I'm holding it with the pc wrench, but this thing seems to be bolted on here. Since it happened o the guy in the other thread, is this something I am to expect.

 

Is the only way to try and put wd and hope that it loosens?

 

I appreciate the help as this thing is brand new.

 

Thanks


Edited by Gotallofthem
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Mine seems to do this each time, but it is just a matter getting your PC Wrench on the PC's spindle (?), and a 17mm (11/16"??) ring spanner on the plate adaptor, then simply undo it.

 

Excellent advice, worked perfectly, guess if it keeps getting stuck, I'll just use that combination.

Also when using the 4" adapter/screw, do you use the spacer that came with the PC or is the Spacer only for the Full size backing plate.

?

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Excellent advice, worked perfectly, guess if it keeps getting stuck, I'll just use that combination.

Also when using the 4" adapter/screw, do you use the spacer that came with the PC or is the Spacer only for the Full size backing plate.

?

 

I always do, just to be safe.

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Alright,

 

So the reason I was using the 4inch on the PC was to try and remove some scratches. After reading a couple of posts and seeing a couple of videos it seems that the best way to remove them would be using a Drill.

 

So my drill is actually broken, so I was going to get a new one. Question is how strong of a drill do I actually need?

I'm not going to lie, the thought of using a little "mini rotary" scares me. I am as I said new to this, but I want the scratch taken care of.

 

So would a mini hand drill with 200 RPM/27 in. lbs be good enough to take out a scratch?

Or do I need something with 650 Rpm/130 in. lbs?

 

Of course the reason I am mentioning the 200 RPM drill, is once again, I figure there is a less chance of doing damage, but at the same time would it be enough to take out a scratch? Would using a 200 RPM drill be stronger then using my PC 4inc SSHR, at speed 4 which didn't seem to remove the scratch.

 

Thanks

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I like the idea of using a variable speed drill myself.

 

My last correction I used my 240 volt corded hammer drill, around 3000rpm max from memory, not sure on torque, but plenty. It has a dial on the trigger for setting max rpm, I had that set at a touch over half way, so I'd guess around 1700rpm. Then I just bought up the RPM slowly so as not to sling the polish everywhere.

 

You are correct, the slower the RPM the less chance of damage, but the longer it will take. And at 200rpm you'd be there for a month! ;)

 

Don't under do yourself. Get a drill that is more than capable. If your going with a cordless, get one with a two speed box, that way you can get comfortable with using it in 1st gear, then switch to 2nd once your ready. You'll need one with good torque too, or it will bog down under load.

 

If your really worried about using a "mini rotary" then go grab an old fender from a scrap yard, and find out what it takes to actually wreck the paint on that first, then you'll have an idea of just how far you can (or can't) go.

 

I hope that's of some help.

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My last correction I used my 240 volt corded hammer drill, around 3000rpm max from memory, not sure on torque, but plenty. It has a dial on the trigger for setting max rpm, I had that set at a touch over half way, so I'd guess around 1700rpm. Then I just bought up the RPM slowly so as not to sling the polish everywhere.

 

You are correct, the slower the RPM the less chance of damage, but the longer it will take. And at 200rpm you'd be there for a month! ;)

 

Don't under do yourself. Get a drill that is more than capable. If your going with a cordless, get one with a two speed box, that way you can get comfortable with using it in 1st gear, then switch to 2nd once your ready. You'll need one with good torque too, or it will bog down under load.

 

.

 

Yeah perhaps 200rpm is to lite, so I decided to go with a more "normal" drill, nothing quite as powerful as the one you mention, but hopefully it does the job.(bank account is getting drained, cant spend to much, just ordered mor adams stuff yesterday). I ordered a 19v cordless 650RPM drill with a 125in/lb torque, hope thats enough not to get bogged down

 

This weekend I used my 18v makita drill on a speed setting of 5 with no problems. Just make sure to go over the area with the large white pad and FMP to remove any micromarring.

Hmmm.. I checked out the makita website, and it seems that those drills have alot of torque, over 400, hopefuly my 125 torque will be good...

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