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quitting a job


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Have a job related question to ask you guys and gals. I'm resigning my from my current position and was looking for advice. Do I need to tell them where I am going? I worry about my direct manager gossiping, talking trash, possibly contacting the new company, etc. I just generally don't trust her. And another co worker who is looking to leave agrees.

 

Part of me feels like NOT telling anyone will create more issues and the reality is eventually SOMEONE will find out and it'll be around the office before anyone knows it.

 

Never done this before, NOT looking forward to it (dealing with resigned and the crap I will hear for 2 weeks). First job out of college, been there for 6yrs but it is absolutely time for me to move on.

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I don't think that it is any of their business where your going. Your giving them 2 weeks notice and that should be sufficient. I would think the less you say the better. Good luck.

 

Chris,

 

The only thing I've heard of before is, depending on what type of job TJ is in, you can't go to a direct competitor if you signed something when he took his current job. Am I correct? I forgot the terminology, but it's called something:help:Other than that, there should be absolutely no reason you have to tell them where you are going:rockon:

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It is none of their business where you are going. Exit professionally. i.e. give your 2 week notice in writing, smoothly hand over any open projects you might have during the last 2 weeks if you are allowed to do so.

 

On the last day, finish up, grab your coffee cup and glide out the door.

 

What isn't told can't be leaked, so don't talk about it if you go out for drinks on your last day.

 

And it's called a non-compete clause in the employment agreement.

Edited by Doug123
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And get your two week notice in before someone finds out and they fire you. Once your notice is in, they owe you the two weeks even if they send you home that same day. some let you work up to the last afternoon and other want you gone right now.

 

Don't start packing until you give them the notice.

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It is none of their business where you are going. Exit professionally. i.e. give your 2 week notice in writing, smoothly hand over any open projects you might have during the last 2 weeks if you are allowed to do so.

 

On the last day, finish up, grab your coffee cup and glide out the door.

 

What isn't told can't be leaked, so don't talk about it if you go out for drinks on your last day.

 

And it's called a non-compete clause in the employment agreement.

 

Excellent advice here. If asked, just say that you're moving on to purse other opportunities. Where you go is none of their business.

 

That said, don't burn bridges. Thank them for the time you had there and go out graciously/gratefully. You never know -- I've had former employers call me to take on freelance work which helped my new company grow.

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All good advice here. I would not tell them where I was going. You could say that you have been presented a new opportunity in your working career. Let them find out another way where you went.

 

Well my last employer when I turned in my two week notice they tried to have the last word and said you need to clean out your office and leave immediately. So it worked out great I had a mini vacation before my next job. It took them a while before they did find out.

 

Just do not burn that bridge.

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All good advice here. I would not tell them where I was going. You could say that you have been presented a new opportunity in your working career. Let them find out another way where you went.

 

Well my last employer when I turned in my two week notice they tried to have the last word and said you need to clean out your office and leave immediately. So it worked out great I had a mini vacation before my next job. It took them a while before they did find out.

 

Just do not burn that bridge.

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You are not obligated to tell them anything! You are moving on and that's it! If your boss was used as a reference they cannot bash you in anyway to your possible new employer! I believe this is a labor law. They could only ask about your duties at job, your work record,attendance record etc etc . Good luck with the new gig!

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I doubt they let you sign a non-compete if this was your first job out of school. But even if you did sign something, I've learned that non-competes are usually not enforceable by the employer. A judge will simply not allow something that's too restrictive to the employee's chances in finding a new job.

If they ask where you're going just give them a vague answer as to what industry. You are under no obligation to disclose anything.

 

Good luck in your new job! I hope you have a better supervisor there!

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And get your two week notice in before someone finds out and they fire you. Once your notice is in, they owe you the two weeks even if they send you home that same day. some let you work up to the last afternoon and other want you gone right now.

 

Don't start packing until you give them the notice.

I agree, except if there are things you may want to take get them out first in case they do watch you pack. We spend so much time at work you can't help but have files at work and the computer that are really yours. No since having HR or security watching you copy files from the computer.

And good luck at the new place.

Bruce

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my wife's a recruiter, and helps people she gets hired with the transition. here's a good example of what a 2 weeks notice should look like:

 

Today’s Date

 

Manager’s Name

Company Name

Company Address

 

Dear Mr./Ms. Manager

 

Please accept this letter as my two-weeks notice of resignation. My last day of work will be (last day).

 

While I have been very satisfied at XYZ Company, I have decided to make this move to advance my career. I have enjoyed working with you and appreciate the opportunities I have been given here.

 

I will do my best to hand off my current projects prior to (last day of work). Please let me know if you need my help in any other way.

 

Sincerely,

 

(sign here)

 

Your Name

 

cc: (names of those being copied on the letter)

 

keep it short and to the point. here's some good tips on how to do it professionally: How to Resign Gracefully: 8 steps - wikiHow

 

if they act unprofessional about it, don't argue with them. simply tell them, "if that's the way you feel, then I'd be happy to leave immediately" and walk out. be prepared to leave that day.

 

never accept a counter-offer. here's why: Why You Shouldn't Take a Counteroffer - On Careers (usnews.com)

Edited by 2010TexasEdition
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Thanks everyone for the input. I'm changing industries so even if I signed a non compete agreement it wouldn't matter. Going from Trust accounting to corporate audit, not 100% finalized, just waiting on the official offer after today's conversation with their HR dept.

 

I have no desire to burn the bridge or being unprofessional about leaving so I plan on giving 2 weeks notice which seems to be the standard acceptable amount, they would prob appreciate more notice but oh well.

 

Thank you Ryan for the sample letter and the tips, I will probably use the letter as is.

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Nicely said, everyone. I am familiar with non-compete clauses, as I was required to sign one to continue employment at one point. Two weeks is normal and accepted for resignation time. If they don't like it, there isn't much that they can do about it. I worked for a company that said they would like a month. They didn't get it from any exiting employees.

 

In some fields, like IT, when you give your notice, they walk you out of the building right then, as if you have admin rights anywhere and or physical access to the equipment, you could potentially do damage to the systems or interrupt service.

 

Yup, try and leave professionally and graciously, and don't burn bridges, as tempting as it might be. Sometimes you may return in a much higher position - it happens. :D

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