Jump to content
Customer Service 866.965.0400

Epoxy floors Colorado


MBX5
 Share

Recommended Posts

Epoxy FTW!

 

I'm having it done next month in my garage. The first quote I got for my 3 car garage was $1,100 but the cost of everything in this oil town is inflated due to labor shortages!

 

Other option is DYI epoxy like U-Coat-It. I don't have time to do that myself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first quote I got for my 3 car garage was $1,100 but the cost of everything in this oil town is inflated due to labor shortages!

 

Got one quote today at the home show on my 3 car and it was 2,500.00.

 

That is why I have always figured out how to do stuff on my own. The internet is your friend when it comes to learning how to do stuff that your unsure of the process.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Gone & Forgotten

I own a painting company. I've painted more garage floors than I can count. Many with Epoxy paints (2 part). It's expensive, but simple to apply. Ventilation is important, temperature is important and prep (cleaning and dust control) is important, but other than that it's simple to do. I could do my own garage floors (2, 1 single and one 1000 sf double car) for a few hundred - the cost of the paint. Labor - about 1 hour for the smaller and 2-3 hours for the larger. Cleanup/prep included.

 

Unsure why anyone would charge more than $200-$300 plus materials for a simple garage floor paint job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I own a painting company. I've painted more garage floors than I can count. Many with Epoxy paints (2 part). It's expensive, but simple to apply. Ventilation is important, temperature is important and prep (cleaning and dust control) is important, but other than that it's simple to do. I could do my own garage floors (2, 1 single and one 1000 sf double car) for a few hundred - the cost of the paint. Labor - about 1 hour for the smaller and 2-3 hours for the larger. Cleanup/prep included.

 

Unsure why anyone would charge more than $200-$300 plus materials for a simple garage floor paint job.

 

It's all about what people are willing to pay in your particular area. Unfortunately I live in a small white collar oilfield town where people pay stupid amounts for services normal people elsewhere do themselves.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My garage floor has the gray paint on it. How hard is it to get that up before laying down the epoxy?

 

Pretty easy if you have the right tool. You can rent one at any good tool rental store.

 

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yqixFWNlnLo]Concrete floor grinder - YouTube[/ame]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pretty easy if you have the right tool. You can rent one at any good tool rental store.

 

 

That's cool, I didn't even know a machine like that existed. How would you get into the corners and along the edges of the walls where it can't reach?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's cool, I didn't even know a machine like that existed. How would you get into the corners and along the edges of the walls where it can't reach?

 

By hand... recently had a setup quoted and to have the floors ground/scored, decontaminated, and then coated (3 car) it was $2200. It also comes with a 15 year warranty against fading, chipping, peeling. I asked the same question and he said they have to hand score the corners and they use a chemical to also etch the concrete a little to prep it for coating.

 

I have gotten much cheaper quotes, but none of them would guarantee the floor for very long if at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's cool, I didn't even know a machine like that existed. How would you get into the corners and along the edges of the walls where it can't reach?

 

You could do it a couple of ways. In the below video it shows like a sander with a pole that you use by hand. Or you could pick up a grinder with the appropriate disc and I would think that would work as well. Or use the two together. Jump to 3:20 seconds and it will show the hand tool.

 

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lT7v7f_DlWI]Paint & Coating Removal Tool for Concrete Floors "Scrape Away" - YouTube[/ame]

 

I would recommend using water. Not only would it keep the dust down, but would also prolong the life of the sanding disc.

 

IMHO, the biggest part of any battle when it comes to just about anything is knowing what tools are available for the job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Gone & Forgotten

Crazy. Epoxy will bond to just about anything. Short of wanting a stained concrete finish, I'd just clean it with the cleanser that comes with the epoxy kit, let dry, put up a dust barrier at the garage doorway and paint it.

 

Filling cracks and holes is advised prior, but epoxy bonds to virtually anything that's already on your floor. Scraping up loose paint or Sheetrock mud s part of the prep.

 

 

Edit***

Temperature plays a factor in the curing of the epoxy. If you have cold floors, either wait for the temps to rise or get a kerosene/lp gas blower heater and warm it up. Room would get pretty hot while making concrete less cold, so count on those epoxy fumes to be pretty unbearable.... To the point of burning your eyes like bleach. Respirator alone may not be enough in that situation.

Edited by KicktoTheJunk
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Crazy. Epoxy will bond to just about anything. Short of wanting a stained concrete finish, I'd just clean it with the cleanser that comes with the epoxy kit, let dry, put up a dust barrier at the garage doorway and paint it.

 

Filling cracks and holes is advised prior, but epoxy bonds to virtually anything that's already on your floor. Scraping up loose paint or Sheetrock mud s part of the prep.

 

 

Edit***

Temperature plays a factor in the curing of the epoxy. If you have cold floors, either wait for the temps to rise or get a kerosene/lp gas blower heater and warm it up. Room would get pretty hot while making concrete less cold, so count on those epoxy fumes to be pretty unbearable.... To the point of burning your eyes like bleach. Respirator alone may not be enough in that situation.

 

Epoxy will definitely stick well to a 'cleaned' floor, but also consider concrete is porous, so even a small amount of oil on the floor will easily be beyond cleaning unless you grind.

 

I have too many friends with bubbling/peeling DIY floors to go that route myself. I'd either rent the grinder (much like painting you need to scuff the underlying substrate for best results IMO) or pay someone to do it and rely on the warranty.

 

For the money its worth it (again IMO) to get some guarantee it won't start peeling up after a few seasons or a spill or 2.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...