Jump to content
Customer Service 866.965.0400
  • 0

Water Blades


Nickefer
 Share

Question

I'm curious for what everyone's opinions are on water blades for aiding in drying a car.

 

I'm not opposed to using a blower as I have done before but it is just not convenient for me so that is out of the question.

 

I have the GWT and it's great, no complaints, just for the bulk of the water I'm considering a water blade then do my normal dry and buff with detail spray.

 

Thanks for the input guys.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Recommended Posts

  • 0

I have to agree. Years ago I bought one at a car show (you've all seen the guy) and tried it on my DD. Well, there was something stuck in it and it scratched right down the hood...........one big long scratch. After a whole litany of curse words, the thing went into the trash. I don't recommend them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I argue that if you care for it as you would your towels you will have no problems. Trash can get stuck in your towels just as easy if not easier and scratch your paint as well. So i find that argument invalid.

 

It will only ever be used on a clean car. It's not like I'll just toss it to the ground when finished. Like I said, treat it as you do your towels and I don't see the problem. Nothing will be picked up from a clean car to scratch the paint. If that was going to happen, it would of by now rubbing multiple towels/pads/applicators over my paint every time I wash it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I use one all the time at work. On my car however I just do the windows sometimes. I didn't test to see if it did scratch or my but after the correction I did I chose not to use it anymore. If you do get one get a California water blade not those cheap foam type that can be found

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
I argue that if you care for it as you would your towels you will have no problems. Trash can get stuck in your towels just as easy if not easier and scratch your paint as well. So i find that argument invalid.

 

It will only ever be used on a clean car. It's not like I'll just toss it to the ground when finished. Like I said, treat it as you do your towels and I don't see the problem. Nothing will be picked up from a clean car to scratch the paint. If that was going to happen, it would of by now rubbing multiple towels/pads/applicators over my paint every time I wash it.

 

I agree. I use one, very carefully and with a very light touch on the car, and I've never created any damage. :2thumbs:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
I agree. I use one, very carefully and with a very light touch on the car, and I've never created any damage. :2thumbs:

 

x2

 

I love the California water blades. I've used them for over 10 years and still use them on my glass. They work great to get water off quick with the sun in play.

 

If I'm washing a car that hasn't been polished or never will be, I use the blade to dry the entire car.

 

You have to go with the old T-bar design, as the new v blade ones suck.

 

I found a seller on eBay that still sells the old T-blade jelly blades and bought 4 of them last Spring. They last nearly forever. I use them in my shower too, gets the water off the glass doors in a second.

Edited by Mark L
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
I argue that if you care for it as you would your towels you will have no problems. Trash can get stuck in your towels just as easy if not easier and scratch your paint as well. So i find that argument invalid.

 

It will only ever be used on a clean car. It's not like I'll just toss it to the ground when finished. Like I said, treat it as you do your towels and I don't see the problem. Nothing will be picked up from a clean car to scratch the paint. If that was going to happen, it would of by now rubbing multiple towels/pads/applicators over my paint every time I wash it.

 

I disagree with you for one important reason.

 

When using a water blade, any dirt or dust on the car will find itself under the blade part and literally rubbing across the paint. There is no buffer between the rubber part (ie the blade) and the paint.

 

Using a drying towel over a water blade carries two important advantages:

 

1) Dirt particles can get trapped in the fibers and have less potential to scratch the paint. Notice I said less, so it is not fool proof.

 

2) When using a drying towel you are constantly flipping over to new unused sides of the towel. If there was a dirt particle entrapped in a fiber, well guess what, you're no longer using that particular fiber anymore.

 

For these reasons, I too, fall into the anti-water blade camp :)

 

In order of least potentially swirl inducing to most potentially swirl inducing, for me, it would go:

 

High Pressure Air > Drying Towel > Water Blade

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

2) When using a drying towel you are constantly flipping over to new unused sides of the towel. If there was a dirt particle entrapped in a fiber, well guess what, you're no longer using that particular fiber anymore.

 

The "same" could be done with the blade in my opinion. Just as you flip your towel after say each panel, rinse your blade after each panel, well guess what, you're no longer rubbing that dust over your paint anymore.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
The "same" could be done with the blade in my opinion. Just as you flip your towel after say each panel, rinse your blade after each panel, well guess what, you're no longer rubbing that dust over your paint anymore.

 

It sounds to me that you have made up your mind before you even posted the original post and question.

 

All I can say is good luck. Use quick detailer as a lubricant an let us know how it turns out.

 

Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk 2

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I think the argument can be made a CA water blade is sufficient for non-polished vehicles, as they already have swirls.

 

I wouldn't use a CA water blade on a freshly polished and waxed vehicle though, as it may induce swirls.

 

I will continue to use them on glass, however, as it gets the water off in a hurry. I then go over the windows with an Adam's MFWW and detail spray and I've found that combo is a winner.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Yeah Im going to say I will pass on these for use on my cars paint. I have two new ones not used yet and 2 others we keep in our bathrooms.

 

The video was great but I say none of the above with all 3 of those car washes.

I have a touch-less robotic power wash car wash near my house I use during the winter months. I will get out and use a MF drying towel when its finished and that's it.

 

Friends use these blades all the time but I work to hard to keep my wife's and my cars paint looking good I don't feel like doing a paint correction every time I use one of these.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
It sounds to me that you have made up your mind before you even posted the original post and question.

 

This.

 

I have one, but I haven't used it on vehicles post-detail. Seemed a bit risky to me. On glass is another story entirely.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

You'll have to try it and let us know. My findings were that they left straight line scratches all over my BLACK car that I hadn't yet corrected. When I corrected it, I noticed them and the blade went in the bin and I've seen NO straight line scratches like them since. :rockon:

 

I rinse with just the hose open (no sprayer) to get as much water off as possible then blow off the rest of the water, spray the vehicle with WW and then dry. The WW helps encapsulate the dirt particles and insulate them from the paint. This method has worked well for me and since correcting, I don't see any straight line scratches.

 

Chris

Edited by Chewy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I think it all comes down to proper technique towel drops to the floor do you use it? No. Master blaster do you blow up the dust on paint? No. Don't point it down to flush up dust and debris. With the blade it's tricky has to be absolutely clean and I would wet it before using. If I want water off I use pooling technique and if there is still water on certain parts of car example hood,trunk,doors I open the hood water runs off same with the trunk. The doors you have to open anyway to dry jams so do jams and then close them this allows some of the remaining H20 to fall off!!!! And I trust Adams great white drying towels I use the to the max to soak up the water! Proper technique trumps everything!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
The "same" could be done with the blade in my opinion. Just as you flip your towel after say each panel, rinse your blade after each panel, well guess what, you're no longer rubbing that dust over your paint anymore.

 

I guess that's true but there are still a few things you are forgetting:

 

1) You didn't say anything about the buffer. Water blades have no buffer between dirt and paint. Microfiber does.

 

2) Cleaning a water blade after every section will add time, not a lot, but still the primary purpose of the water blade is to be fast and convenient. By having to wash it after every section, you now have made it slower and less convenient.

 

3) What if someone didn't have access to a hose and was doing a waterless wash? It wouldn't be possible to wash the water blade correctly after every section. This would further reduce the convenience.

 

 

So let's see this in a nutshell.

 

Can water blades be as safe as microfiber drying towels? Yeah, I think so, if you're being super anal about how you are taking care of it and making sure to keep washing it.

 

Are water blades inherently more potentially swirl inducing than drying towels? You bet!

 

Is it worth the time and effort to keep the waterblade perfectly clean to avoid scratching the paint instead of just using a drying towel which is so much more hassle-free? No, I think not.

 

Your choice :thumbsup:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
I guess that's true but there are still a few things you are forgetting:

 

1) You didn't say anything about the buffer. Water blades have no buffer between dirt and paint. Microfiber does.

 

2) Cleaning a water blade after every section will add time, not a lot, but still the primary purpose of the water blade is to be fast and convenient. By having to wash it after every section, you now have made it slower and less convenient.

 

3) What if someone didn't have access to a hose and was doing a waterless wash? It wouldn't be possible to wash the water blade correctly after every section. This would further reduce the convenience.

 

 

So let's see this in a nutshell.

 

Can water blades be as safe as microfiber drying towels? Yeah, I think so, if you're being super anal about how you are taking care of it and making sure to keep washing it.

 

Are water blades inherently more potentially swirl inducing than drying towels? You bet!

 

Is it worth the time and effort to keep the waterblade perfectly clean to avoid scratching the paint instead of just using a drying towel which is so much more hassle-free? No, I think not.

 

Your choice :thumbsup:

 

BINGO! :2thumbs:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...