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How dangerous is the Flex?


pharmassive
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Ok... I have a dilemma. I want to start machine polishing my cars. I take extra good care of them but over time they have gotten to the point where they need a good machine polishing. I work 50-60 hours a week and love spending time with my girls so with my limited time I would assume that the Flex would give me the fastest results. I am scared about ruining the paint though, especially on my beloved S60R which has a lot of curves on it. Is there any reason not to just start in with the Flex? Give it to me real please. I may not post a lot, but I'm always checking this forum, and these are the opinions that i trust. Thanks in advance brothas and sistas!

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If you're really nervous about machine polishing (though really you need not be) and you're just going to do one or two cars a year, get a PC and enjoy spending a little more time on the job. That's where most of us got started, and no one has any regrets about doing so. If you really want to speed up the job or will be doing a ful correction on a car every few weeks (yours, friend's, relative's, etc) get a flex. I really wouldn't worry about causing any damage with either of them, though, as long as you're not doing anything incredibly inattentive. :2thumbs:

 

Rich

 

Missing my Wilbur chocolates, now, too, after seeng your post. :rockon:

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I lost my polishing virginity over the weekend with my flex. As long as you watch the adam's videos a few times you should know exactly what to do. It takes a little bit to get the hang of it, especially on lips and curved surfaces, but once you get used to it its not so bad. It does take a long time though!

 

My main tip is to make sure you have the polisher flat or it will try to run away from you. Also its not good for the pads

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OP, get the flex, I NEVER recommend the PC anymore. It's simply underpowered compared to other "safe" dual action polishers like the Griot's Garage.

 

 

If you're really nervous about machine polishing (though really you need not be) and you're just going to do one or two cars a year, get a PC and enjoy spending a little more time on the job. That's where most of us got started, and no one has any regrets about doing so. If you really want to speed up the job or will be doing a ful correction on a car every few weeks (yours, friend's, relative's, etc) get a flex. I really wouldn't worry about causing any damage with either of them, though, as long as you're not doing anything incredibly inattentive. :2thumbs:

 

Rich

 

Missing my Wilbur chocolates, now, too, after seeng your post. :rockon:

 

I disagree. I totally regret buying my PC. I lost $50 dollars on my resale. If I had to do it again, I would either have started with a Griot's Garage or a Flex.

 

I do agree with you that you're really not going to cause any damage unless you're working on an old car with lots of oxidation or you're just being inattentive.

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The Flex and PC are the safest polishers IMO. No need to worry.. watch Adams videos and take some notes. LOL!

 

The Flex is worth its investment but you cannot go wrong with the PC as a beginner if you are only doing a handful of cars a year.

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I think you be satisfied with the Flex.. :thumbsup: If it is in your budget to get it, then step with it. Just do not go overboard on spending money if you are tight with the funds. Keep an eye out for sales and specials also. :cheers::cheers:

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Angelo, if you want to make the hour and a half drive west to my place, I'll gladly let you test drive both machines on your car before making the decision. :2thumbs:

 

I find I use both machines during a detail, the flex for the large open panels, and the PC with the focus pad kit for door and windshield pillars and tighter areas on curvy panels...

 

If I had to live with one, the PC is slower but offers more versatility.

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I disagree. I totally regret buying my PC. I lost $50 dollars on my resale. If I had to do it again, I would either have started with a Griot's Garage or a Flex.

 

The differences between the GG and PC gets greatly over exaggerated in the detailing community.

 

The machines both operate nearly identically save for the more powerful motor in the GG. They both have the same cap speed, same throw, same everything. It simply takes MORE downward pressure to slow/stop the centrifugal rotation on the GG at the same speed it would with the PC.

 

I do like the D ring hangle it has on the GG, but I hate seeing the perpetuation that the tool totally reinvented the DA polishing game... it simply isn't true. The 7424xp got the same kind of attention when it came out (not many seem to remember that) and replaced the standard 7424. It took the max cap speed from 6000 opm to 6800opm, relocated the speed control, and everyone acted like the XP was completely redefining the polisher world... 800opm is a difference, but it wasn't exactly HUGE as many discussions would have you believe.

 

SPECS:

 

GG 6":

  • Amps: 7 / 850 watts
  • 2,500 - 6,800 oscillations per minute
  • 5/16" orbit pattern

 

PC 7424xp:

  • Amps: 4.5 / 500 watts
  • 2,500-6,800 oscillations per minute
  • 5/16" orbit pattern

Edited by Dylan@Adams
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I just purchased the PC, and I do kind of wish I got the Flex. However I'm a near beginner with machine polishing so I'm glad I started "small". I just purchased the 4" pads and backing plate for the PC, I can definitely see how those will be useful to get into tight spaces.

 

Once I "outgrow" the PC, I'll either buy the Flex outright and keep the PC for tight spots, or sell my PC for ~$50 less than I bought it. I think that's a pretty reasonable cost for the knowledge and practice it's given me...

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The differences between the GG and PC gets greatly over exaggerated in the detailing community.

 

The machines both operate nearly identically save for the more powerful motor in the GG. They both have the same cap speed, same throw, same everything. It simply takes MORE downward pressure to slow/stop the centrifugal rotation on the GG at the same speed it would with the PC.

 

I do like the D ring hangle it has on the GG, but I hate seeing the perpetuation that the tool totally reinvented the DA polishing game... it simply isn't true.

 

While I am aware of what the detailing community says, I was talking about my own experiences. Going from a PC to a Griot's Garage was a huge difference, to me.

 

Like you, I don't think that they reinvented the DA polishing game, but the improvement of the GG over the PC is noteworthy.

 

1) The extra power, as noted, makes it much harder to stop spinning. I've taken off 30-45 minutes off a full detail because of this.

 

2) Also, as noted, the handle is actually functional. The PC handle tends to offcenter my balance so I stopped using it.

 

3) I've found that the GG is less likely to bog down on curved panels, although it still will stop if pushed too far.

 

4) There's extra cushioning on the machine itself.

 

So yeah, it's not a game changer, but, in my opinion of course, there is a noticeable difference between the PC and the GG.

 

And all of this for the same price as the PC. I just don't see why anyone would choose the PC over it.

 

:glasses:

 

P.S. No disrespect ever intended Dylan, just two guys talking detailing :rockon:

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The only way a Flex will hurt your paint is if you use without a pad!

 

It's so easy even a caveman can do it. Heck, even I can do it!

 

I started out with the Maguire's version of the PC. It also has a D handle. It came off after the first use. Easier to hold onto the head.

Edited by GXPaycheck
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Like you, I don't think that they reinvented the DA polishing game, but the improvement of the GG over the PC is noteworthy.

 

No disrespect taken Roshan. :cheers:

 

We're on the same page here... and I'm sure you've seen it to... some guys would have you think that the GG was crafted by God himself out of pure gold. Is a nicer body design and a more powerful motor an improvement? Absolutely... in the same way the XP was an improvement over the standard 7424, but it is marginal (IMO). It was evolutionary not revolutionary.

 

A big part of the hardcore detail fans out there are very much 'flavor of the month' types... where whatever is new is automatically best. I do my best not to get caught up in the hype as there is A TON out there and look at everything from a practical standpoint.

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I never used a pc I bought the flex and I love it. Haven't used it a lot but in the small session I had it was masterful. Both machines have their place in the detailing world and most who have bought the pc first eventually moved to the flex. It's a natural progression. Those who have both like some have said use the flex on larger panels and set the pc up with the focus pads and use it in tight spot over the drill which can damage the paint if used in the wrong matter.

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OP, get the flex, I NEVER recommend the PC anymore. It's simply underpowered compared to other "safe" dual action polishers like the Griot's Garage.

 

 

 

 

I disagree. I totally regret buying my PC. I lost $50 dollars on my resale. If I had to do it again, I would either have started with a Griot's Garage or a Flex.

 

I do agree with you that you're really not going to cause any damage unless you're working on an old car with lots of oxidation or you're just being inattentive.

 

Get the Flex....I have the PC and regret not getting the Flex to start with. Your car is black just like mine and you'll regret getting the PC.....

 

I agree with these guys. I should of went straight for the flex. I just recently bought the PC and i think i've reached its limits.

 

My truck is black, almost 8 years old, and has had VERY neglected paint. I've been polishing it every so often on my days off and am not 100% satisfied with the results. There are minor swirl marks that just wont come out with the PC. I mean i got a HUGE improvement over what it was. But the paint wont come perfect. I've did 4 passes (SSR, SHR, FMP) on a bunch of panels and theres still light swirl marks in them. The only way for me to get a perfect panel, is to break out the 4inch focus pads on the cordless drill and go to town.

 

Wish i would of sprang for the flex.

But if your car is newer and the paint really hasnt been that badly neglrected im sure you can get away with the PC.

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I started with the flex, had no polishing experience. Luckly I live close to Adams warehouse so I got to try both machines out. If you want perfect black paint get the flex, only way to damage the paint is to fall asleep with the polisher on the paint, or use it as a hammer.

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I think it's important to keep in mind that while all of us who are saying "I wish I went straight to the Flex" say that knowing now what they DIDN'T know the first time they picked up a power tool (their first PC) and put it to the finish of their expensive car. There's a lot to be said for starting out a little slowly, too, and learning your way up, getting comfortable with what a machine can and cannot do. You can always buy a PC, use it for a year or two, and then sell it for what, $50 less than you paid for it originally? :2thumbs:

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Angelo, if you want to make the hour and a half drive west to my place, I'll gladly let you test drive both machines on your car before making the decision. :2thumbs:

 

I find I use both machines during a detail, the flex for the large open panels, and the PC with the focus pad kit for door and windshield pillars and tighter areas on curvy panels...

 

If I had to live with one, the PC is slower but offers more versatility.

 

Thanks for the offer, but I have very little free time and would never impose. I may go with the pc with the 4" pads but like the sound of the flex. Is the flex safe on door pillars for example or would I need the pc with 4" pads for that

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Thanks for the offer, but I have very little free time and would never impose. I may go with the pc with the 4" pads but like the sound of the flex. Is the flex safe on door pillars for example or would I need the pc with 4" pads for that

 

It takes a little experimenting, but its not bad. If you pick things up quickly it won't be an issue, otherwise it will just take a little extra work and care.

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