Jump to content
Customer Service 866.965.0400
  • 0

How I can detect if the paint/clear coat are soft or hard?


csrt4
 Share

Question

21 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

To get all techy you can get a tester similar to what the Baron used in this post http://www.adamsforums.com/topic/25801-2013-nissan-gt-r/?hl=nissan.  Never used one but I'm sure some people can chime in on it.

 

EDIT:  This is only for paint thickness not clear coat thickness.  

Edited by ksell87
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

 

 

I was just going to be a smart *** and tell you to take a nail and scratch your car. If it goes clear through the clear coat to the paint or bare metal.........SOFT!

 

But I won't tell you that.  I have to behave. :jester:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Hi, I have ask the question, because after searching about a Dodge Challenger on the forum, I have not find the information about my paint.

 

The car that I need to work was a Dodge Challenger RT 2013 and a truck Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD 2008.

 

Thanks,

 

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Like Mook said searching is your best bet. I've never worked on a Challenger paid but have done few Dodge Rams and the paint was pretty hard. A good indicator would also be sticky paint and that's a sign of soft paint or if you're geeting a lot of micro marring.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

To get all techy you can get a tester similar to what the Baron used in this post http://www.adamsforums.com/topic/25801-2013-nissan-gt-r/?hl=nissan.  Never used one but I'm sure some people can chime in on it.

 

EDIT:  This is only for paint thickness not clear coat thickness.  

 

I stand corrected.  Sorry for the incorrect info OP.  

 

They measure clear coat thickness as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I also own a Dodge Challenger, and I'd say the clear coat is pretty hard. It doesn't readily scratch. I haven't needed to correct my paint in over almost two years after my first correction and proper washing. There are some micro-scratches starting to appear in certain lighting conditions, but that's to be expected even with proper care on a daily driver.

 

You have to be patient with a PC-7424XP to get any results, and there's a few places I never could get completely swirl-free with the Porter Cable. One of these years I'll upgrade to a Flex. 

Hope that helps.

These are photos of about 9-12 months after the paint correction... With proper washing technique, the hard clear is staying pretty swirl/scratch free.

ch-front2.jpg

ch-trunk.jpg

Another reflection shot
ch-ref.jpg

 

Edited by mattpiper
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I always liked that car Matt!

 

 

You have to be patient with a PC-7424XP to get any results, and there's a few places I never could get completely swirl-free with the Porter Cable. One of these years I'll upgrade to a Flex. 

 

Step up to the MF Cutting pads.  IMO they add "Flex like" power to the PC, thus saving lots of time.  Most times you can finish with PFP & a white foam pad, and you still are only doing 2 correction steps.

And on some finishes you can just do the last movements of the section pass with very light pressure and not have to use the Finishing polish at all.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Hi,  I would like to know how I can detect if the paint/clear coat of a car is soft or hard ?

 

Thanks,

 

Steve

 

You can not always tell what type of clear the car has so I work a 2ft x 2ft. test section first to get my polishing plan -  polishes + pads.  Sometimes it take 2-3 test sections to get the combo right.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I might as well show my Challenger too. 2014 R/T Classic. 2 weeks old. Plan to do a correction with the Cyclo in the fall; there were a few minor scratches from the factory. Is there a recommendation on weather to use the foam or microfiber pads for a new clear coat?

post-11875-0-80157400-1401742685_thumb.jpg

post-11875-0-68318500-1401742719_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

If the paint is in good condition with light to moderate defects then I would use foam pads.  If you have heavy defects then I would go microfiber.  I would recommend a test spot with a white pad and finishing polish.  If you need more correction try out the orange pad with correcting polish.  If the clear is hard and you need more correction then I would go to MF pads.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

If the paint is in good condition with light to moderate defects then I would use foam pads.  If you have heavy defects then I would go microfiber.  I would recommend a test spot with a white pad and finishing polish.  If you need more correction try out the orange pad with correcting polish.  If the clear is hard and you need more correction then I would go to MF pads.

 

Best advice yet.  The softest/stickiest clears I've found so far:

 

-Infiniti

-Toyota/Lexus

-Subaru (ultra sticky paint)

 

I know Adam's is an all Cyclo gang now but when they supported the PC/GG/Meguiars 6" polishers with the 6.5/7" pad system I think they should have also offered a 5" backing plate with 5.5" pads.  Much easier to keep pad rotation and gives more correcting action on the random orbital polishers in my experience, and easier to work a section with a slightly smaller pad (less pad surface/area translates to more correcting power).

 

I think the better question Steve is this:

 

-What machine or machines do you use, what size pads currently and what type of pads do you own, and what is your compound/polish of choice?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I might as well show my Challenger too. 2014 R/T Classic. 2 weeks old. Plan to do a correction with the Cyclo in the fall; there were a few minor scratches from the factory. Is there a recommendation on weather to use the foam or microfiber pads for a new clear coat?

 

Start with foam pads, as it's likely that you won't need MF pads on a 2 week old car...unless the dealership had their "detail" monkeys get ahold of it during prep.

 

The "newness" of the clear coat doesn't matter, the level of damage and what it takes to correct it is what dictates what pad/polish combo is best for your situation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I might add too that if your clear is hard it won't scratch as easy but it is harder to correct....and if it is a soft clear it will scratch easy but it will also correct easy. All of the newer Dodges that I have polished seem to have a med. clear, not to hard and not to soft.

Post up some pic when done.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...