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Looking to do my own swirl removal work: What should I get??


StubStang
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Oh my friend, this is gonna be a while...

 

I suggest watching this playlist to get most of the machines down. They don't talk about the Rupes lineup but they have individual video about each one on Adam's channel on Youtube.

 

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4ju56j0wCCVIDhcVxoV_kUe1cATiKn_D

 

Each polisher has its own pros and cons and it also depends what you want to do with it. Correct 1 car a year or 10? And so on, tons of options for different budgets

 

As far as what you need, find the polisher first then buy the kit that comes with it. The basic products would be: Detail Spray, Clay Bar, paint correcting, paint finishing and paint sealant along with at least 2 single soft towels or better

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There is a great chart on Adam's website, " Choosing a Machine" plus the videos are great at explaining and introducing the machines. I have an old PC, which is a good intro DA, at a lower cost. Also have a Cyclo, which I love as it does a great job, and doesn't vibrate me to death, like the PC does. Any of the machines Adam's sells will do a great job.

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Oh my friend, this is gonna be a while...

 

I suggest watching this playlist to get most of the machines down. They don't talk about the Rupes lineup but they have individual video about each one on Adam's channel on Youtube.

 

 

Each polisher has its own pros and cons and it also depends what you want to do with it. Correct 1 car a year or 10? And so on, tons of options for different budgets

 

As far as what you need, find the polisher first then buy the kit that comes with it. The basic products would be: Detail Spray, Clay Bar, paint correcting, paint finishing and paint sealant along with at least 2 single soft towels or better

 

I have the detail spray, clay bar, soft towels and paint sealant .I've been using these products for the past two years (hand applied the paint sealant)

 

I read the chart on the adams website but I wanted peoples opinions, what they liked more and so on!

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There is a great chart on Adam's website, " Choosing a Machine" plus the videos are great at explaining and introducing the machines. I have an old PC, which is a good intro DA, at a lower cost. Also have a Cyclo, which I love as it does a great job, and doesn't vibrate me to death, like the PC does. Any of the machines Adam's sells will do a great job.

I read the chart! I wanna hear what people think about different machines and then ultimately make a decision 

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Andrew,

 

It really comes down to how bad the scratches and swirls are, and how much money you will end up spending on a machine.

 

The Cycle and Rupes 15 are both great, well balanced, and correct the majority of defects, although they may require additional passes with the various pads and polishes.

 

The Flex will correct more defects more quickly, but has a higher learning curve to use compared to the others.

 

The Adam's chart, and videos show all of the "pros & cons" of each machine, and it truly does come down to your own unique needs and budget.

 

By the way, I have a Flex, Cyclo, and Rupes Mini, and use them all at various times. For me, the Cyclo finishes the best on most vehicles, the Flex repairs the quickest, and the Mini is used for small specific areas only.

 

Hope this helps.

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Since you read the charts,

 

I started with the PC but outskilled it fairly quick and I turned it into a 4" inch small area polisher.

 

I now have the Flex 3401 which I really like, fast and powerful but you have to be a bit more careful with it and definitely have to hang on to it.

 

I tried the cyclo and was amazed on how smooth it is, next to no vibration, I could do a panel all day without getting tired.

 

Comes down to what you are comfortable with, I chose the PC at first because it is impossible to do damage to your car with it even if you try. I didn't have much knowledge of the polishers so I felt safet that way.

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Andrew,

 

It really comes down to how bad the scratches and swirls are, and how much money you will end up spending on a machine.

 

The Cycle and Rupes 15 are both great, well balanced, and correct the majority of defects, although they may require additional passes with the various pads and polishes.

 

The Flex will correct more defects more quickly, but has a higher learning curve to use compared to the others.

 

The Adam's chart, and videos show all of the "pros & cons" of each machine, and it truly does come down to your own unique needs and budget.

 

By the way, I have a Flex, Cyclo, and Rupes Mini, and use them all at various times. For me, the Cyclo finishes the best on most vehicles, the Flex repairs the quickest, and the Mini is used for small specific areas only.

 

Hope this helps.

It did! the car hasn't had swirl removal in a while but the paint and clear coat are still in pretty good shape. I won't mind doing various passes, I just don't wanna mess up the paint!

 

Since you read the charts,

 

I started with the PC but outskilled it fairly quick and I turned it into a 4" inch small area polisher.

 

I now have the Flex 3401 which I really like, fast and powerful but you have to be a bit more careful with it and definitely have to hang on to it.

 

I tried the cyclo and was amazed on how smooth it is, next to no vibration, I could do a panel all day without getting tired.

 

Comes down to what you are comfortable with, I chose the PC at first because it is impossible to do damage to your car with it even if you try. I didn't have much knowledge of the polishers so I felt safet that way.

 

 

I like the idea of going the safe route, especially if it still offers positive results!

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I like the idea of going the safe route, especially if it still offers positive results!

It does but it takes a few more passes to ge the job done. The cyclo is just as safe as the PC. All machines are safe but some are a tad more forgiving than others

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If I were to recommend one polisher for someone fresh into correcting paint it would probably have to be the cyclo. Had a pc for years, and while it did get the correcting done just fine for the 2 vehicles I maintain, it does vibrate a good bit and just doesn't compare to the higher end polishers adams carries. Was thrilled when I upgraded to the cyclo, very comfortable and easy to use, can do large panels while also reaching tighter areas, and is completely safe to use without fear of damaging the paint. My 2nd recommendation would be the rupes 15, just purchased one and only tried it out a few times, but absolutely love everything about the 15 and can't wait to put it to use, only down side to the rupes 15 is it won't be able to fit some tighter areas like pillars or around door handles, which I have the mini or cyclo for those areas anyway. I have always avoided the flex, while many love it, I tend to try and take things to the next level and polish paint a little more than I should, and could see myself causing damage with the flex. The cyclo is a good fit bc it can do large and tighter areas, but the rupes 15 may require a 2nd polisher for tighter spots. Choose wisely my friend!!

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As said its up to you, I would start with what is your budget and work from there. 

 

I started with a PC and it really is a great machine as Adam says for those doing a couple corrections a year. Cheap entry level but quality tool. Will do you just fine, not as fast as other models Adams offers but certainly capable of handling your need. 

 

I have moved on from mine however (its now with another member here) and have upgraded to a Cyclo and Mini, I like the ability to share the pads between the two machines and keep less stock of pads around. I have not put a bunch of work into it yet but yeah....its a really smooth pair of tools. 

 

I have heard a lot of great things about the Flex, however I was also warned that it is a beast of a machine and might be a bit much for a new detailer. Not saying it couldnt be handled but it does by far work the fastest at correcting. 

 

If money was no object...I would own a Rupes 15, Cyclo, and Mini. As stated they all have their place in the shop but can all be used alone and produce just fine results. 

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