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Full Detail This Weekend. Want To Get Somethings Straight


Cwilliams
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I am going to be doing a full correction this weekend. I have a machine, I have the correct pads and correcting polish and finishing polish. I will wash, clay, wipe down, correct, finish and then I need help with the order of sealants, glazes and waxes. I have the sealant. buttery wax and brilliant glaze. This will be my first major legit detail/correction so any tips would be greatly appreciated.

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I'm going to do some paint correction Sunday or sometime soon and I know I have sealant and a fresh layer of H20 Guard and gloss on it and when I wash the vehicle should I put 2oz of APC in the soap bucket or wash with dawn? I've seen this on here before but I couldn't find it when I looked

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I am going to be doing a full correction this weekend. I have a machine, I have the correct pads and correcting polish and finishing polish. I will wash, clay, wipe down, correct, finish and then I need help with the order of sealants, glazes and waxes. I have the sealant. buttery wax and brilliant glaze. This will be my first major legit detail/correction so any tips would be greatly appreciated.

Me,

I'd do

Brilliant Glaze

Paint Sealant

Buttery Wax

 

Then stand back and admire the shine! :glasses:

 

I agree with Dave, this is my preferred order.

 

I'm going to do some paint correction Sunday or sometime soon and I know I have sealant and a fresh layer of H20 Guard and gloss on it and when I wash the vehicle should I put 2oz of APC in the soap bucket or wash with dawn? I've seen this on here before but I couldn't find it when I looked

 

Add the APC into your regular wash bucket.  Washing with dawn will also remove all the old product but is bad about drying out rubber seals and such, especially on older vehicles.

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Do a 2 ft. x 2 ft. test area to determine how much correction is needed, and how many passes will be needed.  This is also where you will test the 'least aggressive' method first.  Pick a few places that on the hood, tape them off, and try your first combo - does it meet your expectations?  If yes, then you are set to do the rest of the car.  If not, then go more aggressive,  After using CP to remove the defects determine if FP is required - go over the test area with that and compare with the unfinished area.  Now you have your process for the rest of the car.

 

Tape off trim, window and sunroof rubber surrounds, and embplem 

 

Go slower than you think you should

 

Make sure the pad is flat on the surface - very important with the Rupes machines

 

Take breaks - It is a marathon, not a sprint!

 

 

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I'll chime in with the opinion that Paint Sealant should go on first - before Brilliant Glaze. I've tried it both ways and prefer it this way:

 

1:  Sealant

 

2:  Glaze

 

3:  Wax

 

Plenty of differing opinions on here so try it for yourself and see what works for you.

Edited by Beemer
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No good reason I'm aware of for the Sealant to go on first, you can if you want, no big deal.

My thoughts and experience:

Sealant adheres to the bare paint.

Glaze won't adhere very well to the sealant, even if locked down with wax.

 

Glaze is to fill minor imperfections after polishing, and to add clairity-the pop, to the paint. The Glaze adheres to bare paint

Seal afterwards to lock the Glaze down to the minor imperfections in the paint.

Wax on top of the sealant to add extra depth and gloss

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^I'm with beemer on this one. All my daily driver customers get the same steps every time. Sealants bond to paint better than glazes or waxes do, so Paint correct first, then seal , then glaze, then wax, then ENJOY THE SHINE !! 

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At about 5:25 in the youtube link two posts above, Dylan talks briefly about layering. He mentions putting the Wax over top of the Sealant, he mentions nothing regarding Brilliant Glaze and layering, however he does say something about putting Sealant directly to the bare paint at around 5:43. I respect Dylan and his advice, I've worked with him at clinics before, as well as attended to simply watch him, he knows his stuff. However, on testing I've done, I see no less durability to my Sealant application being underneath, or on-top of Glaze.

 

Car care isn't rocket science, and not everything one individual states will be the same for every person, vehicle, or condition. I can quickly find a link for instructions from another Car care Company, with a Google search, stating glaze being put down prior to sealant application.

 

In my testing, I don't see the Glaze filling in the minor imperfections as well when it's being put over the Sealant. When the Glaze is put on bare paint it fills and hides better. The Sealant can then lock down the Glaze, holding it there for a longer period of time.

 

Try part of a hood, roof, or rear deck lid both ways, see what you think.

Again, for me, its:

Glaze

Sealant

Wax

Edited by BRZN
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     My advice would be to go slow and take your time. Paint decontamination and proper correcting is important in creating great shine. Not to make things more confusing but just yesterday I used the Brilliant Glaze first followed by the Patriot. I am more then impressed with the results. As mentioned before every car is different. This was on one of our Challengers, which rarely sees any rain so I opted not to use any sealant. Now our daily driven Jeep Wrangler the order was wash, clay, polish, sealant. Follow up maintenance is done with the H2O GG. I did not use any wax due to all the black plastic and small surface area.

     The inferno red will look good! Post some pictures when your done!

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I agree with Dave 100%.......I always lay down BG after polishing as a matter of fact I apply the BG over top of the polish residue and wipe them both off in one shot, it works great. Then I apply PS over the BG, then on reds or blacks I will apply a coat of wax over the PS.

Adam and I have had this discussion several time and we are in agreement in this process.

Happy detailing!

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I agree - I just have to constantly chime in and tell people you can apply your Glaze (if you use it) at any point in your detailing regimen, it will not build up and it probably doesn't degrade the polymer in the Paint Sealant to make it deteriorate any faster.

 

However, the biggest misnomer spread on this forum s this concept of "locking in" your Glaze by applying Paint Sealant over it to make it "last longer" - chances are once you have spread on Paint Sealant you have removed any of the Glaze remaining underneath anyway, why you may ask? 

 

Brilliant Glaze I'm sure of and most likely Paint Sealant as well both have a delivery system using a solvent (you can smell it slightly although the licorice scent in Paint Sealant masks it well)- this is why when you wipe on Brilliant Glaze it hazes up so quick, and in Paint Sealant it is used there to deliver the polymer to the paint and to keep it liquified and emulsified so that it can cure on the surface, the solvent will evaporate and you are left with the haze on the surface that we remove with our Double Soft towels. Without that solvent in the sealant you would basically have a 16 oz bottle of goopy ooze - the sealant wouldn't be spreadable by hand in the least.

 

Now, with any solvent content in a product like Sealant or Glaze, that solvent carrying the polymer, glaze, etc is CLEANING the surface of what it is being applied to - Which is also why Brilliant Glaze is so GREAT on Glass, Chrome, etc, its the cleaning power inherent in addition to the minor filling ability!  - And also many times Chris, Dave, Dan, etc say sure you can apply your Glaze, Sealant, etc right over Detail Spray and claying residue (and I agree with them on all those counts, as well as you can apply Glaze before Sealant if you want with no negative effects, etc) - that solvent in the 2 products mentioned will clean the surface as it is applying the actual product, sort of a 2 in one.  Try it for yourself next time, go clay a panel, let the Detail Spray dry, and wipe a layer of glaze or sealant over it and cure as usual and then remove - the surface will look clean and freshly sealed or glazed.

 

That brings me to my point and the biggest myth that is spread around here - you cannot apply a solvent-carrying sealant which will inherently clean anything on the surface under it and tell me that "the glaze gets locked in and lasts longer" - it is not happening.  What you are seeing is a super rich rock hard shine from your sealant that is so blindingly bright - any filling ability of the Glaze is severely compromised and/or completely gone once something is put over it.

 

Not making a debate of it, however, I'm just speaking from a chemical perspective and not a "Well I think it does this because thats what I think I'm seeing" perspective - take my 2 pennies for what they are worth.

 

I've said it once and I've said it again a million times, I recommend if you use a Glaze to apply it at any point in your detailing regimen, you can apply it after every wash, on top of wax, before wax, on top of sealant, under sealant, but don't spread the misnomer that a product that will last about a week in direct sunlight suddenly lasts months because a sealant is applied over top.

 

EDIT: Chris I am in 100% full agreement with you and Adam on the Glaze application process that you can apply at any time before or after, and even wipe down claying residue with it since the heavy cleaner in Brilliant Glaze will do the job for you, killing 2 birds in one stone :patriot:

Edited by Ricky Bobby
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Okay, question for Dave and/or Chris. I'm asking cause I truly don't know the answer and I don't know as much as you guys. Does using a machine to apply sealant have any effect on the BG? I can see where the old spray sealant might be better because you don't use a machine to apply it.

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Brian, By using a machine to apply, you are simply able to put the product down in a thinner layer, and more consistently. IMHO, there's not enough solvent in the Sealant that when being applied will remove the Glaze; machine or by hand.

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Brian, By using a machine to apply, you are simply able to put the product down in a thinner layer, and more consistently. IMHO, there's not enough solvent in the Sealant that when being applied will remove the Glaze; machine or by hand.

 

I agree!!

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This topic really is insane! Ridiculous?

 

It really doesn't matter, do as you wish, and as you like. Again, this is car care!!!

 

No where in that video clip does Adam say the Sealant must be laid on bare paint, nowhere in the video clip does he give specific direction of any particular order.

 

Check out what he states from :45-1:12

 

Results anyone? With your steps?

Me:

One layer of BG

Two coats of either Americana or Patriot

One additional layer of BG prior to showing.

(The below car pics are from a cell phone, but I hope you get my point.)

IMG_3570resize_zpsrmr8q3ba.jpg

 

IMG_7404resize_zpscmus4qpx.jpg

 

IMG_7405resize_zpsleih8ong.jpg

 

IMG_7406resize_zpsaswbjjy4.jpg

 

03resize_zps8ae6dd3c.jpg

 

01resize_zps619299a0.jpg

 

02resize_zps870771f8.jpg

On my daily driver's I substitute the Paste Wax for Paint Sealant, and that last layer of BG for Americana. They look almost as good as the GTO.

Do as you like, in any order you like, your results may vary.

Edited by BRZN
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nowhere in the video clip does he give specific direction of any particular order.

 

 

LOL, I have watched that video a dozen times and every time I watch it hear Adam say Paint correction, Brilliant Glaze and then wax or sealant.  Its very clear to me.

 

This topic is asked about and debated to death because end users do not have a clear understanding of the order because even Adams Staff doesn't seem to agree on it. I can assure you that I am not the only customer that feels this way as I have talked at length to several other people that feel the same way.

 

I am to the point I have just came to the conclusion it probably doesn't matter.

 

That said, I love the GTO. Brazen is by far my favorite color and yours looks great.

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Guest washemup

If your using a machine to correct and polish your paint, this is where your shine comes from. While glazes, waxes, and sealants will add some shine to your paint, 95% of the shine comes from polishing.

 

IMO glaze really isn't needed if you machine polish, since you have removed the defects, and polished the finish to a high gloss, your LSP is more for protection, not shine. But if you like using it, by all means do so.

 

If your car is un-garaged or a DD, LPS, then use HGG every couple months, this gives your car plenty of protection against mother nature.

 

For a garage queen or a show car, Americana or Patriot, you can also use glaze to kick up the shine a little. Being that these type of vehicles aren't exposed to the elements much, wax provides ample protection.

 

This isn't to say that you can't use wax on a DD, it will just need to be re-applied more often.

 

Whatever products you go with, doing an IPA or eraser wipe down after polishing, before applying your first layer of protection, will provide a surface that your product will have the best bond. Maximizing the longevity of it.

 

If you want to use different combinations of products, that's fine. Find what works best for you, and continue using it.

 

For me, the most important step to car care is proper washing/drying, because this is the step that will make or break your shine.

 

Once you have removed defects and polished to a high gloss, there is no sense to do this if your just going to put defects back in. And while it's impossible not to get some defects over time, especially on a DD, minimizing them so only finishing polish is ever needed to fix them is the goal.

Edited by washemup
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If your using a machine to correct and polish your paint, this is where your shine comes from. While glazes, waxes, and sealants will add some shine to your paint, 95% of the shine comes from polishing.

 

IMO glaze really isn't needed if you machine polish, since you have removed the defects, and polished the finish to a high gloss, your LSP is more for protection, not shine. But if you like using it, by all means do so.

 

Once you have removed defects and polished to a high gloss, there is no sense to do this if your just going to put defects back in. And while it's impossible not to get some defects over time, especially on a DD, minimizing them so only finishing polish is ever needed to fix them is the goal.

Sorry, but I beg to differ...

 

I've been detailing cars for fun or profit for 39 years and have progressed from High Speed Rotary's, wool pads, and cotton diapers to today's technologies in car care and speak from that experience. Experience, not someone else's YouTube video's.

 

On a daily driver, defects will be put back into the paint. Stuff flies up from the car in front of you and hits the front bumper, you drive in the rain and dirt from the road scrapes across the lower sides of the vehicle, you park in a public parking lot and someone walks by your car brushing it. Minimizing these defects is the job of a good Glaze in-between polishing.

 

My first polish session on the GTO, after I purchased it new, was 40 hours. I did not remove all the paint's defects even with 40 hours of attention.

 

Machine polishing will remove (correct) swirls, holograms, and scratches, but won't leave your paint at 95% of it's shine.

 

Glaze is for the clarity, the pop, the wow factor. The glaze hides the small imperfections you were unable to get completely out by machine polishing. It makes the paint clear, no hazing left to dull the finish.

 

A good high grade carnauba wax will give the finish it's gloss, and depth as well as adding a layer of protection.

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Guest washemup

Tell me what wax is on this finish?

 

There isn't a glaze or wax at ANY price that will produce shine like this. Anyone who states it will is misinformed, or just trying to sell a product.

 

Just is case you want to know, this paint has no glaze, wax, or sealant on it.

 

Shine comes from polishing, ask ANY professional detailer. Ask Dylan who you are friends with, he will tell you the same thing.

 

I have also been detailing for many years, but I'm not posting this for a "Who's the best detailer?" contest. Just speaking the truth.

 

 

 

Here also are pics of my ungaraged daily driver, It was compounded 2 years ago, nothing but occasional finishing polish ever needed. This shine isn't from sealant, glaze or wax. It's from polishing..

Edited by Chris@Adams
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