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New gen pad problem using Rupes LHR15 mark 2


jessewsmith
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Has this happend to anyone? This is the new gen pad and I was using the mark 2 at speed 4 and 3. I wasn't pushing hard but I had enough force to keep the polisher flat. I did a test spot on the bed of my truck and then finished the bed. I then moved to another panel but it had 3-5 minutes to cool down I'd say. I took the pad off and it was extremely hot. The face of the pad was cool and that's what I was watching for but when I removed the pad the backing plate and the part of the pad that hooks to it was very hot and I noticed it looked like this. I grabbed another orange and white pad and they worked just fine. Any ideas?

post-13717-0-10876000-1462803141_thumb.jpg

Edited by jessewsmith
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The machine is going to generate a good bit of heat to the backing plate, which is going to transfer to the pad. If the backing plate and Velcro on the pad were extremely hot as you said, the pad may have been worked for too long causing the glue adhesive to get too hot. The twisting pattern of the Velcro looks like maybe the pad was also stalling some and not oscillating smoothly while the glue membrane was possibly melting, but that is just my observation from the picture.

 

It could also just be a defective pad. It happens from time to time. As stated on Instagram, we'll get you squared away :thumbsup: 

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Have not used my new pads yet either. Hasn't stopped raining for almost the whole week. Hope they all don't do that

Like I said this was the only one that it happend to but it gets really hot pretty fast so you need to give it time to cool off

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is it just me or is this seeming to happen more with the Mark II over the Mark 1?

 

Remember that selling feature of 40% more power? LOL 

 

Even Rupes' pads are having issues with it too. SLOOOOOW those machines down seems to be the consensus. 

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is it just me or is this seeming to happen more with the Mark II over the Mark 1?

 

To be expected - the tool has 40% more power than its predecessor. If you don't adjust technique for that added power you're going to cook pads. If we added 40% more torque to your car and you drove it the same way you did before you'd go thru tires faster too :)

 

The twisting action I'm seeing in the OP's picture points to potentially an issue with pressure (too much). The face of the pad is attempting to stop (frictional resistance) while the tool is attempting to continue its movement. The pad then starts to twist under the stress. This is exaggerated even further with the use of softer/less rigid non-reticulated foams that may allow for more movement in the middle. To solve this many pads have to rely on more rigid foam compounds or some kind of rigid intermediate material.

 

As far as the heat buildup - understand that this is NOT the tool. The most intense part for friction/heat in the entire process is between the hook and loop. This engagement point is an area of high friction. The hooks are constantly moving against the softer loops generating heat. If you were to measure the heat each layer after a buffing cycle you'd see the point of contact between the 2 surfaces will be the hottest point with any tool, but more so with large orbit polishers due to the amount of movement.

 

Also consider (and most people don't) engagement compatibility - there are literally hundreds of hook types and hundreds of loop types. I'm not privy to the type of loop material on these pads in particular, but if you get a pairing that has sloppy engagement it will have more 'slack' and shifting movement, thus creating more friction, which generates more heat.

Edited by Dylan@RUPES
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^Didn't think about too much pressure - with the Rupes I was always under the impression that you really almost need no pressure but weight of your arm and the machine does the work - which is the opposite of what we grew up on using - the traditional downward pressure of a random orbital like a PC7424 et al

 

Thanks D for dropping knowledge as always

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^Didn't think about too much pressure - with the Rupes I was always under the impression that you really almost need no pressure but weight of your arm and the machine does the work - which is the opposite of what we grew up on using - the traditional downward pressure of a random orbital like a PC7424 et al

 

Thanks D for dropping knowledge as always

 

Correct. The weight of your hand and the tool is more than enough. You're steering the polisher and ensuring it stays flat - thats all. No pushing down - the tool is stronger than you and its definitely stronger than foam so its going to wear you out and ruin your pads if you attempt to force it down.

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