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Need some guidance..


Tony'ssrt
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So just purchased a few large orders and purchased a PC polished but after reading it has a lot of vibration and I plan to paint correct my jeep srt and my Chrysler 200 and mom's 300..I plan to return the PC and either get a cyclo or rupes 15 or mini...what in your opinion would work best for me a beginner? Hope I get some advice as I want to purchase this tomorrow once they open lol..

Edited by Tony'ssrt
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Start with what you have.  And if you want to upgrade later, sell it.  You may not even enjoy paint correcting.  The mini is more of small area machine and would take forever to do a car with.  I still have my PC that I started with as well as 3 other polishers.  

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Honestly the PC is probably the best for beginners.

thank you I hear that just know I'll want to upgrade

I agree. I would stick with the PC for now til you get the hang of it.

If you're only doing those 3 cars, that will plEnty of machine for you. If you plan on doing a car a month (or more), then maybe you would think about another machine.

I think when I am home on between work I want to do other ppl cars I have a few friends who need some work done lol so maybe I can make a few bucks.

Start with what you have. And if you want to upgrade later, sell it. You may not even enjoy paint correcting. The mini is more of small area machine and would take forever to do a car with. I still have my PC that I started with as well as 3 other polishers.

 

I hate buying something and then wanting to upgrade and sell it if I know I'll want something better later.

I wouldn't give up my PC. I now use it as a 4 inch setup. Too valuable to get rid of, and really, the vibration isn't bad. Great machine to start with.

My other choice was to maybe get a rupes 15 and a mini? Or cyclo and keep the PC for smaller areas but with the backing it comes with I don't think it will work any good. And if i dont like correcting then I can always use the cyclo with brushes to creep tile around the house or carpet lol but I love detailing my car and I enjoying anything hands on really.just stuck on what I should buy

Edited by Tony'ssrt
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I wouldn't give up my PC. I now use it as a 4 inch setup. Too valuable to get rid of, and really, the vibration isn't bad. Great machine to start with.

I heard that using the 4" setup causes more vibration..and I'm not a fanew of too much vibration lol
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I heard that using the 4" setup causes more vibration..and I'm not a fanew of too much vibration lol

 

But remember, you are only correcting a small area with the 4" pads.  The vibration is not that bad with the PC, but is not nearly as smooth at the Rupes (I have not used the Cyclo, so I cannot speak to that machine)

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But remember, you are only correcting a small area with the 4" pads. The vibration is not that bad with the PC, but is not nearly as smooth at the Rupes (I have not used the Cyclo, so I cannot speak to that machine)

But if I just want to throw money on a better machine should I just pull the trigger on the mini rupes and send the PC back and either buy a cyclo or rupes 15 for the bigger areas..I hear it has a better correcting power.

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I recently started correcting/polishing. Let me tell you this - starting on the PC gave me wisdom I wouldn't have otherwise obtained. Technique, pacing, product application are just a few of the things you'll learn as your skill set grows. I would definitely start with the PC. It is a good machine for the money and it's incredibly durable. I very recently purchased a Rupes 15 MkII. The two tools approach their job in different ways, and I prefer the Rupes, but it doesn't make my PC worthless.

 

In the same way racecar drivers build their skills driving slower vehicles, I highly recommend building your skill on the more forgiving PC first.

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I recently started correcting/polishing. Let me tell you this - starting on the PC gave me wisdom I wouldn't have otherwise obtained. Technique, pacing, product application are just a few of the things you'll learn as your skill set grows. I would definitely start with the PC. It is a good machine for the money and it's incredibly durable. I very recently purchased a Rupes 15 MkII. The two tools approach their job in different ways, and I prefer the Rupes, but it doesn't make my PC worthless.

 

In the same way racecar drivers build their skills driving slower vehicles, I highly recommend building your skill on the more forgiving PC first.

Thank you for the advice..I heard it is a great tool and then I hear pwoolen say if the had the money they would have just went with the rupes at the time..is the rupes mini or 15 less forgiving?
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I have just about all the DA's and a couple rotaries, even though the PC lacks in pure power I still use it on every detail. It's a great tool to learn on, you learn real fast on how to keep the pad flat or it will stall which later will translate to every other polisher you buy. When I started I had to use speed 6 to keep the pad spinning because my technique was so poor. Does it vibrate? Yes but it's very versatile and bulletproof, every machine will have its quirks but it's a tool that you will find a use for. With the 4" pads the vibration is almost gone because the pad is smaller and your speed setting is lower. For correcting I like the Flex or Rupes15, polishing I like the Rupes and smaller areas I prefer the Mini but I wouldn't trade the experience of learning with the PC, it'll keep you out of trouble,burn thru less pads and allow you to learn a good technique.

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I have just about all the DA's and a couple rotaries, even though the PC lacks in pure power I still use it on every detail. It's a great tool to learn on, you learn real fast on how to keep the pad flat or it will stall which later will translate to every other polisher you buy. When I started I had to use speed 6 to keep the pad spinning because my technique was so poor. Does it vibrate? Yes but it's very versatile and bulletproof, every machine will have its quirks but it's a tool that you will find a use for. With the 4" pads the vibration is almost gone because the pad is smaller and your speed setting is lower. For correcting I like the Flex or Rupes15, polishing I like the Rupes and smaller areas I prefer the Mini but I wouldn't trade the experience of learning with the PC, it'll keep you out of trouble,burn thru less pads and allow you to learn a good technique.

Well i guess I'll keep the PC and buy both the rupes mini and 15 lol and just see if I like the PC do they offer the 110% if I don't like how it runs?

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Well i guess I'll keep the PC and buy both the rupes mini and 15 lol and just see if I like the PC do they offer the 110% if I don't like how it runs?

 

Your best bet is to call Adam's and speak with one of their excellent sales reps for more information on return policies.

 

Thank you for the advice..I heard it is a great tool and then I hear pwoolen say if the had the money they would have just went with the rupes at the time..is the rupes mini or 15 less forgiving?

 

I will clarify by saying the Rupes is an excellent tool and is quite forgiving.

 

Look, I am just a dude on the internet. I took a specific path to begin acquiring a skill. There is nothing standing in your way of purchasing the Rupes 15, Mini, or even the Flex. If you want to learn on a professional tool, then you should do it! My point is that learning on a less expensive, lower-quality machine will provide wisdom and insight. But there are benefits to starting with a more expensive tool, too.

 

Internet advice will only get you so far. At some point you've still got to make up your own mind. I wish you the very best of luck and I hope you'll post some photos of your work.

Edited by PHOKUS
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Your best bet is to call Adam's and speak with one of their excellent sales reps for more information on return policies.

 

 

I will clarify by saying the Rupes is an excellent tool and is quite forgiving.

 

Look, I am just a dude on the internet. I took a specific path to begin acquiring a skill. There is nothing standing in your way of purchasing the Rupes 15, Mini, or even the Flex. If you want to learn on a professional tool, then you should do it! My point is that learning on a less expensive, lower-quality machine will provide wisdom and insight. But there are benefits to starting with a more expensive tool, too.

 

Internet advice will only get you so far. At some point you've still got to make up your own mind. I wish you the very best of luck and I hope you'll post some photos of your work.

Thanks you and I read some of your other post on ur experience..I went with the rupes mini and the rupes 15 and I can't wait to try them...

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