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Jason S.
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So I finally broke down and ordered some Brilliant Glaze. I've read one too many posts that sing its praises. So it's getting added to my detailing cart. I also ordered the red pad to go with my SK. My new process will be Glaze + LPS + Americana.

Questions:

If you top the glaze with LPS sealant, how does the glaze wear away if its under the cured sealant?

Additionally, does the glaze under the LPS negatively affect the chemical bond of the sealant with the paint?

I studied Physics, not chemistry, so this doesn't quite add up to me.

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So I finally broke down and ordered some Brilliant Glaze. I've read one too many posts that sing its praises. So it's getting added to my detailing cart. I also ordered the red pad to go with my SK. My new process will be Glaze + LPS + Americana.

Questions:

If you top the glaze with LPS sealant, how does the glaze wear away if its under the cured sealant?

Additionally, does the glaze under the LPS negatively affect the chemical bond of the sealant with the paint?

I studied Physics, not chemistry, so this doesn't quite add up to me.

 

This is a well argued in the forums. Its split down the middle but the facts are the facts. The science behind paint sealant means it will adhere better to the paint if it's to the bare paint. 

 

I recently just ordered some Brilliant Glaze myself, and used it this weekend after my H2O G&G routine because I had the time. WOW! 

 

My layers are Paint Sealant, H2O G&G topping monthly, and then this weekend, Brilliant Glaze.

 

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Sealant bonds best to clean paint, because the acrylic resins need a clean surface to get the best bond, to provide the longest protection. Using BG first leaves fillers on the surface, preventing a full bond.

 

The sealant will not last near as long being applied on the top of the glaze, perhaps only a few weeks or a month, and not the normal 6 month lifespan that the sealant can provide.

 

Like John said, its the science of how the sealant gets its longer duration of protection. Just like in painting, whatever you put on the top layer is only as good as what's under it. You could have a $100 per gallon epoxy paint that will last 30 years, but if you do not prep the surface right or use a $5 per gallon primer under it, that expensive epoxy paint is likely going to peel off in under a year.

 

You can apply BG before PS, nothing bad will immediately happen, but the sealant won't last as long because it does not bond as well to the BG. Its a trade-off, if you have imperfections that you want to fill, you can apply BG first. If you are only using BG for shine, then put it on after the sealant so you get the longest protection from the sealant.

 

So, if your goal is to use the glaze to hide imperfections or to add more gloss, and you want it to last a little longer than normal, add a layer of sealant or wax on top. However, if your goal is to have a long lasting layer of protection by using the sealant, apply it first to bare, clean paint.

 

Here's a quote from the FAQ:

 

 

 

 

LAYERING MULTIPLE PRODUCTS

As a general rule, the most durable product should always be used as the base, so for example if you were working with a sealant and a wax, the sealant would be your base layer that is then topped with the wax. The only exception to this rule comes into play with a combination of glazes and wax. Because wax doesn't bond to the paint in the same manner as a sealant or a coating a glaze can be used UNDER a wax to maximize the filling ability of the glaze without compromising the longevity of the wax coat.

If the reason you're adding sealant to the mix is for durability, flip the order of the glaze and the sealant. (Sealant first, then glaze) By putting glaze down first your significantly shortening the longevity of the sealant, and to that end whats the point of sealing if you're not doing it for the durability. You can do it the other way, but the benefits are largely lost.

 

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My routine has been......after a strip wash, clay....etc.

Adams Paint Sealant   Let it cure for a min of 2 days

Adams Americana Wax   One coat, then a second 4 to 5 days later

Brilliant Glaze to keep the shine going over time. You can layer the Glaze as much as you want. It will not build up.

Adams Detail Spray before the drive if needed.

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I just want to dip my toes into this one, Dan handled most of the comments on it, but I wanted to add that I use the method of Glaze under LPS and honestly I have not seen a massive drop in protection. 

 

I have not seen the drop in protection, BUT I also tend to have 2-3 layers on at a time. Currently I have: Glaze, LPS, H20, Wash & Wax (Would have been before normally but it was in that order) topped again with H2O. This is a winter stack that as I said normally wouldnt have that middle H2O in it, but I didnt want to strip off the paint sealant just to wash the truck. I personally like the look of the glaze under, and I will still put a coat of glaze over when I really want to see a shine and spend the 15min with the truck. 

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My routine has been......after a strip wash, clay....etc.

Adams Paint Sealant   Let it cure for a min of 2 days

Adams Americana Wax   One coat, then a second 4 to 5 days later

Brilliant Glaze to keep the shine going over time. You can layer the Glaze as much as you want. It will not build up.

Adams Detail Spray before the drive if needed.

Gary, how long after application has the Brilliant Glaze been providing good shine?

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Sealant bonds best to clean paint, because the acrylic resins need a clean surface to get the best bond, to provide the longest protection. Using BG first leaves fillers on the surface, preventing a full bond.

The sealant will not last near as long being applied on the top of the glaze, perhaps only a few weeks or a month, and not the normal 6 month lifespan that the sealant can provide.

Like John said, its the science of how the sealant gets its longer duration of protection. Just like in painting, whatever you put on the top layer is only as good as what's under it. You could have a $100 per gallon epoxy paint that will last 30 years, but if you do not prep the surface right or use a $5 per gallon primer under it, that expensive epoxy paint is likely going to peel off in under a year.

You can apply BG before PS, nothing bad will immediately happen, but the sealant won't last as long because it does not bond as well to the BG. Its a trade-off, if you have imperfections that you want to fill, you can apply BG first. If you are only using BG for shine, then put it on after the sealant so you get the longest protection from the sealant.

So, if your goal is to use the glaze to hide imperfections or to add more gloss, and you want it to last a little longer than normal, add a layer of sealant or wax on top. However, if your goal is to have a long lasting layer of protection by using the sealant, apply it first to bare, clean paint.

Here's a quote from the FAQ:

 

This seems to make the most sense to me and was also my initial thought. But I have read both opinions. And even Adam, himself confuses me by mentioning both methods in his layering video. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=GMhuxowbakg

Thanks for your response. I think my customers will love the look of the Brilliant Glaze. It won't take long to apply and will add some serious wow factor.

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Joel, I've found that BG will last a good 3 to 4 weeks...with a wash or two in between.

 

I would be really pleased to if it lasts that long for me. I'm going to try if on a dark red garage queen that rarely sees rain. 

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My routine has been......after a strip wash, clay....etc.

Adams Paint Sealant Let it cure for a min of 2 days

Adams Americana Wax One coat, then a second 4 to 5 days later

Brilliant Glaze to keep the shine going over time. You can layer the Glaze as much as you want. It will not build up.

Adams Detail Spray before the drive if needed.

Are you using the new formula paint sealant. I was under the assumption that the new formula only took minutes to cure and not the extended time like the old formula.

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Are you using the new formula paint sealant. I was under the assumption that the new formula only took minutes to cure and not the extended time like the old formula.

 

Cure time depends on climate. Temperature, humidity, elevation all play a role in cure times. As a general rule, I find 30-60 minutes of cure time will yield 85% advertised durability. 12 hours should get you to 100% for most folks living in a temperate climate.

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Are you using the new formula paint sealant. I was under the assumption that the new formula only took minutes to cure and not the extended time like the old formula.

Kevin,  I purchased the Paint Sealant about 4 months ago. Not sure if it's the old or new version. Just as a rule of thumb for me, I let the paint sealant cure more that usual. Plus, also making sure that I have a clean and clear base to put it on so the sealant will adhere to the paint.Aaron is right also. There are may outside factors that come into play when doing your detailing.  That's just me!  :rolleyes:

Edited by Geebee
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Kevin, I purchased the Paint Sealant about 4 months ago. Not sure if it's the old or new version. Just as a rule of thumb for me, I let the paint sealant cure more that usual. Plus, also making sure that I have a clean and clear base to put it on so the sealant will adhere to the paint.Aaron is right also. There are may outside factors that come into play when doing your detailing. That's just me! :rolleyes:

I was just wondering. Never thought of all the variables that could affect it. I always just followed the bottle instructions. I'll let it sit longer next time I use it, and see if I notice any difference. For me I could never let it sit that long as I don't have the best garage situation.

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