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Q&A with Detailed Reflections


shane@detailedreflections
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So in order to help maybe get things away from Limited Editions and Mystery Boxes, I figured I’d start a “Q&A” thread since we are getting tagged in quite a few posts. This is a chance to ask questions about our process, business, products or even just about us!  I’ll ask Marquis and Justin as needed since they aren’t on the forum!  

 

There’s no limit to the questions...so ask away. It just might spark the next write up idea!

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6 minutes ago, 8675309'SS said:

What is you name?

What is your quest?

What is the air speed velocity of an unladen swallow?

 

What are the differences between Microfiber cutting pads vs wool cutting pads.  Why would one choose one vs. the other? 

 

Well, my name is Shane. That’s an easy one!

 

My quest is to keep making cars as clean as we can and to share knowledge and passion for what we do. In the meantime I have to balance that quest with a full time career as a firefighter. 

 

Thanks to your question and google, I now know the speed of a swallow is about 24 miles per hour, or 11 meters per second. Or did you mean a European or African swallow?

 

And then the microfiber and wool pad question. Wool pads are some of the most aggressive pads you can use. Even those come in degrees of cut. They will cut more aggressively than microfiber which cuts more aggressively than foam. As a rule for us, when the wool comes out so does the rotary typically. If we are in so deep we are using wool, we are using an aggressive compound (even a matting compound at times) and a rotary. We are trying to move the process along. It’s slow to remove defects sometimes with other methods, so the wool/rotary will get us there quickly. We then polish the finish back to smooth, glorious life before applying last step products.  Bear in mind that it’s easy to do damage with a wool pad, rotary and compound. Be easy on the edges, very easy. And keep the machine moving. Heat will build up as wool pads work by creating friction. Heat, rotary and abrasives are a dangerous combo. If you’re thinking of playing with them, I suggest using a test panel to show what can be done. 

 

That actually reminds me I have a corvette trunk deck to play with. I should use the matting compound and wool and photo what it does and the steps to bring it back, then different coatings on it. Eventually when I have time...

 

How’d I do??? ?

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21 hours ago, shane@detailedreflections said:

 

And then the microfiber and wool pad question. Wool pads are some of the most aggressive pads you can use. Even those come in degrees of cut. They will cut more aggressively than microfiber which cuts more aggressively than foam. As a rule for us, when the wool comes out so does the rotary typically. If we are in so deep we are using wool, we are using an aggressive compound (even a matting compound at times) and a rotary. We are trying to move the process along. It’s slow to remove defects sometimes with other methods, so the wool/rotary will get us there quickly. We then polish the finish back to smooth, glorious life before applying last step products.  Bear in mind that it’s easy to do damage with a wool pad, rotary and compound. Be easy on the edges, very easy. And keep the machine moving. Heat will build up as wool pads work by creating friction. Heat, rotary and abrasives are a dangerous combo. If you’re thinking of playing with them, I suggest using a test panel to show what can be done. 

 

That actually reminds me I have a corvette trunk deck to play with. I should use the matting compound and wool and photo what it does and the steps to bring it back, then different coatings on it. Eventually when I have time...

 

I would like to add onto the wool vs microfiber thoughts. 

 

Some companies now offer wool pads that are not SO aggressive and actually finish down quite nicely. 

 

A wool pad on a DA can be beneficial as well, although a wool pad on a rotary will kill many defects quickly. 

 

A big advantage of wool is that they actually run cooler than microfiber pads. When correcting paint you don't want to get the working section too hot compared to the temperature of the rest of the panel. From various sources I have learned you don't want the difference to exceed 25 degrees or so (Now I have to go back and check because I can't remember the exact number, but it was either 25 or 40 degrees). 

 

I know Rupes has a wool pad that has decent cut but finishes beautifully and you can actually use it for one step corrections on a middle ground towards the harder side of clear coat. 

 

Don't be scared, play around with some. They work well :)

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Thank you for putting this together.

 

Being in South Carolina we are often faced with temperatures and humidity that are off the scale.  The all time record  set June 29, 2012 was 113 ambient, the heat index was 121 - just a nice warm day.  In planning my new climate controlled garage, I want to make sure I get the right system.

 

Disregarding personal comfort, what is that the optimal temperature and humidity range for:

Performing corrections?

Sealing and waxing vehicles?   

Apply Coatings?

 

Is it recommended to keep the vehicle at the optimal range for a certain period of time after applying the item and if so, what is your recommended time.

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2 hours ago, RayS said:

Thank you for putting this together.

 

Being in South Carolina we are often faced with temperatures and humidity that are off the scale.  The all time record  set June 29, 2012 was 113 ambient, the heat index was 121 - just a nice warm day.  In planning my new climate controlled garage, I want to make sure I get the right system.

 

Disregarding personal comfort, what is that the optimal temperature and humidity range for:

Performing corrections?

Sealing and waxing vehicles?   

Apply Coatings?

 

Is it recommended to keep the vehicle at the optimal range for a certain period of time after applying the item and if so, what is your recommended time.

 

So let’s start at the beginning. Heat is a factor in both application of product and comfort. The heat on the product makes it flash or dry out quicker resulting in a shorter open (or working) time. The heat on the car has the same effect.

 

Ideally 60-80 is perfect and 70ish is the best for comfort. When it’s colder it can take longer to flash. When it’s warmer, it’ll flash faster. 

 

Humidity is also a factor in the form of moisture. Heat and humidity and you’re really putting in the work!

 

If it’s warm, any air conditioner will knock the humidity out and get you comfortable. 

 

As for the vehicle, it’s helpful if it’s not blazing hot from being in the sun all day. The products used will go much further. 

 

And as a random note, to get more open time on a humid day when installing a coating you can store the bottle in a cup of ice. The ice will help to keep the product cool and help you work with it. 

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