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Garage lighting


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Everyone:

 

I have the following fluorescent lights in my garage.  --> 10x 4 ft lights. 

They are 6500k right now and i love how it makes the garage really light up. 

 

I was wondering what "color" fluorescent lights should I get to BEST show the scratches in paint. 

I have already done a full paint correction on my car but I had a light stand which helped me find the scratches. 

Details on my paint correction --> http://www.toquez06.com/ctsvpaint.html

 

I just want to have a set of 10x  4ft fluorescent lights on stand-by if I want to paint correct another car.

It would only take a few mins to swap out the 6.5K's with another color fluorescent lights

Something that really would show the scratches in paint. 

 

I have since ditched the PC and I now have a 15mm Swirl Killer and a Swirl Killer Mini. 

I can't wait to try them both out ! 

 

Thanks

Mark

 

paint01.jpg

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29 minutes ago, mc2hill said:

I use 5000k led lights for detailing work lights, as they are in the 'daylight'  spectrum.  Not sure if the 6500k would better, or be too bright and wash out some things. 

 

Not sure, but it made my car look flawless until i hit it with my LED stand.  Then I could find the flaws easier

 

7 minutes ago, Chris@Adams said:

 

That looks slick ! Ill have to consider that. I also notice its 4000k. Maybe Ill try that color flourescent as well to see if it helps locate scratches ! 

 

Thanks guys !

Mark

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We use 5000K lights since they represent daylight the best. We have 22 lights in our shop which represents over 100,000 lumens of light. 

 

Understand more light isn’t always better. You can chase imperfections that will never be seen in regular daylight. Be cautious of that. 

F2E166F4-CCD2-4B5B-93BE-622596F5A499.jpeg

9D7C30E8-0918-4E42-BFFC-C2862E122D69.jpeg

Edited by shane@detailedreflections
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My overhead lights consist of six 5000k LED's and it gives me good coverage in my garage whether we are detailing or rebuilding.  The first picture is how I have them setup and the second is taken with the lights on and while it was dark outside.  I got mine on Amazon and it was $119 for the 6 and they are linkable.  Once I redo my walls and get rid of the 1972 paneling, I'll be adding some additional lights on the walls, but I don't need anything up to the level of a professional, such as what @shane@detailedreflections has.

 

The last picture is the hood of the Mustang that was just repainted and I took a few minutes ago.  That picture shows the reflection and glare that the lights can cause.  I've found the best way to ensure I'm not missing spots is to make sure I move around to look at the vehicle at different angles.   

Lights On.jpeg

Lights Night.jpeg

Reflection 1.jpeg

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On 1/4/2019 at 6:50 PM, shane@detailedreflections said:

We use 5000K lights since they represent daylight the best. We have 22 lights in our shop which represents over 100,000 lumens of light. 

 

Understand more light isn’t always better. You can chase imperfections that will never be seen in regular daylight. Be cautious of that. 

F2E166F4-CCD2-4B5B-93BE-622596F5A499.jpeg

9D7C30E8-0918-4E42-BFFC-C2862E122D69.jpeg

Man, I wouldn't want to pay your electric bill!! :lolsmack:

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Personally, halogens produce the best amount light when doing a paint correction, LEDs produce the best amount of light for showing off and bringing out the paint perfection and depth. I have 5 strategically placed 500 watt halogens in my ceilings that bring out every imperfection in the paint, (and portable ones too) and 12 48"LED strips in the ceiling as well. Here are some pics to show you what I mean. Look at some of the paint correction work with the halogens and you can see it really pulls out all the imperfections like holograms, slight/deep scratches etc. You don't know how bad your paint is until you put it under halogens !

 

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On 1/8/2019 at 7:34 AM, 07stanggt said:

Personally, halogens produce the best amount light when doing a paint correction, LEDs produce the best amount of light for showing off and bringing out the paint perfection and depth. I have 5 strategically placed 500 watt halogens in my ceilings that bring out every imperfection in the paint, (and portable ones too) and 12 48"LED strips in the ceiling as well. Here are some pics to show you what I mean. Look at some of the paint correction work with the halogens and you can see it really pulls out all the imperfections like holograms, slight/deep scratches etc. You don't know how bad your paint is until you put it under halogens !

 

 

 

I have to disagree with you on the Halogens vs. LED showing imperfections.  I can see just as good with my 5000K/Daylight LEDS as I can with my 500W halogens, and they are much cooler to work with and don't burn out.

 

 

I will upload some pics when I get home.

 

Pic from a 2008 Cayenne Turbo in black metallic

DSCN1107.thumb.JPG.42f7927866ae1542f866340c54cc9ea6.JPG 

 

Edited by mc2hill
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2 hours ago, mc2hill said:

 

I have to disagree with you on the Halogens vs. LED showing imperfections.  I can see just as good with my 5000K/Daylight LEDS as I can with my 500W halogens, and they are much cooler to work with and don't burn out.

 

 

I will upload some pics when I get home.

 

I agree. We can find imperfections all day under our LED lighting. It looks great polished out in photos, but you can also find the damage easy enough. 

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I also use 6000K, 4’ LED lights mounted on wall. Found them on Amazon for a pretty reasonable price, and pulled the trigger. 

 

53E4FA7D-8AE6-4DB2-8A1B-D8FD0E81A936.thumb.jpeg.62acc2b95b4c4cd71d10d6cf317a4ec0.jpeg

 

This pic was taken (during construction) without the overhead lights on. 

Overhead I switched the old 4’ fluorescent tubes out for  (16x) 6” round LED pots, 6000K. 

 

(That said, I still have the big 500W halogen tripods on standby, and an assortment of handheld units to chase the “finer details”)

 

Lots of solutions. 

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