Jump to content
Customer Service 866.965.0400
  • 0

Unger Professional Rinse'n'Go Spotless Car Wash System


Question

Came across this product on the Costco website https://www.costco.com/Unger-Professional-Rinse'n'Go-Spotless-Car-Wash-System.product.100471577.html 

 

I"m assuming it's a new product, as it doesn't have any reviews, and after a quick google search it doesn't seem to be widely available (maybe exclusive to Costco?).  Just wondering if anyone else has seen or used it, and what your thoughts are about it. Claims to provide a "spot free rinse" and according to the user manual you get between 4 - 12 "rinses" per filter (depending how hard your water is). The initial kit is $159 and includes 2 filters, and filters sell in packs of 2 for $79.

 

Assuming it works as advertised, and you can average 8 car washes per filter, that equates to a cost of about $5 per wash... Is this pricey for a spot free rinse?

 

I'm also curious how it effects water pressure, and if it can be placed in front of a pressure washer.

Edited by rseward
Link to post
Share on other sites

15 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

I was a bit skeptical about this at first but it was on sale at Costco so I figured I would give it a try.   I know they always have good quality product and the best price - and now this product has a lot of good reviews.  I couldn't find the Unger Rinse 'n' Go anywhere else.  I've used a more expensive version at home in the past...but replacing the resin was a pain in the *** and expensive.   This one really is much easier to use and gave me the same spot-free results.   The product I had before required an engineering degree to assemble, it was ridiculous.  This Rinse 'n' Go really was ready to go right out of the box.  The resin was already inside.  I played around with it anyway - the resin is in a bag so it's really easy to replace rather than dealing with loose resin.   I didn't use it to wash the dirt from my car because I didn't want to waste the resin so I washed it like I normally do but then used this for the final rinse.  That's what this system is made for - I rinsed the car with this and just let it dry.  The results were great - I didn't have any spots, not even on the glass.   So, I'll tell you guys, in my opinion, it you want a spotless car without having to spend all that time towel drying it, this is for you.   I just wish it had a bypass for regular water if you don't want to use the resin.  I just connected it when I was done washing the car as a workaround.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
6 hours ago, Sam Y said:

I'm curious. If you rinse down a car after using a water softener, does it even need to be dried? Technically it should just evaporate and not leave any spots right?

 

I think softened water still has "stuff" in it that can leave spots. Deionized water will give you true spot-free drying as long as the resin is still good. It's all about the total dissolved solids (TDS) in the water.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
4 hours ago, chops1sc said:

 

I think softened water still has "stuff" in it that can leave spots. Deionized water will give you true spot-free drying as long as the resin is still good. It's all about the total dissolved solids (TDS) in the water.

Yeah that's what a quick Google search got me. I was thinking of getting the Adam's spotless unit but considering it could help a lot of appliances in our house (coffee maker, washer/dryer) to have softer water I was trying to investigate a whole house softener. I know there are different kinds and I was mainly interested in the salt-free ones.

 

So it seems the resin-based systems (not sure if that's the same as salt-free) suspend the magnesium and calcium then there's an overall reduction in TDS (total dissolved solids)? I will probably have to talk to a professional plumber to get their idea.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I'm on a well and we have good water and still added large whole house filter, it wasn't cheap, but it sure does work nicely.  It isn't a softener, it is truly a filter to take care of the sand, sediment and iron and such.  In addition for all the drinking water, fridge, coffee maker and such we have a 3 state deionizer and we don't bother with bottled water at all, just fill the Yeti's and and go. We no longer have to have a filter in fridge or coffee maker and the Britta was donated to my daughter who is on city water.

 

I always have a spray bottle on the detail cart and if I see any kind of streaking or need a little added moisture when using CS3, Ceramic Boost, etc., I just mist it with the deionized water.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
11 hours ago, Sam Y said:

Yeah that's what a quick Google search got me. I was thinking of getting the Adam's spotless unit but considering it could help a lot of appliances in our house (coffee maker, washer/dryer) to have softer water I was trying to investigate a whole house softener. I know there are different kinds and I was mainly interested in the salt-free ones.

 

So it seems the resin-based systems (not sure if that's the same as salt-free) suspend the magnesium and calcium then there's an overall reduction in TDS (total dissolved solids)? I will probably have to talk to a professional plumber to get their idea.

 

There is a difference between softened and deionized water. Do not drink the latter, all minerals are removed so there's no nutritional value, and the taste will be off, too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...