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Wet Sanding


Layson
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I bought myself an old motorcyle that I did a lot of wet sanding on and I really learned what it took to make it look good. It takes time and patience and care. I am doing some of it right now on the fender of my black G8. I'll take photos.

 

Chris

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Truth be told... The thing I have found with set-sanding... Have a good buffer!!

 

Wet sanding is only the first part of the battle... Its getting the shine back afterword that is the hard part to me (I still do all my buffing by hand)

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I'm not sure I would do much wet sanding on my factory finish as I don't think they are as thick as say a custom paint job would be.

 

I do however do it a lot on my cars for rock chip correction.

 

I have a few photos already taken last night and had to wait for the clear to dry to wet sand it again tonight and see if it's level with the surface then I will start the polishing phase.

 

I'll post pics...

 

Chris

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I'm not sure I would do much wet sanding on my factory finish as I don't think they are as thick as say a custom paint job would be.

:iagree: GM (and all manufacturers) have it down to a science on how thin they can spray paint. Wet sanding a factory job runs the risk of going through the clear. Then again I've seen some pros do it. I wouldn't practice on my car.

Bruce

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I'm not sure I would do much wet sanding on my factory finish as I don't think they are as thick as say a custom paint job would be.

 

I do however do it a lot on my cars for rock chip correction.

 

I have a few photos already taken last night and had to wait for the clear to dry to wet sand it again tonight and see if it's level with the surface then I will start the polishing phase.

 

I'll post pics...

 

Chris

 

What is your process of repairing rock chips?? I am curious. Thanks!

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What is your process of repairing rock chips?? I am curious. Thanks!

 

Bear with me... I am taking photo's and will do a step by step...

 

I just hope this one comes out OK... lol

 

Chris

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AJ:help: where are you man?

 

Somebody rang? :willy:

 

I have a three part video series that I did over a year ago on wet sanding. I was using different products then but now I exclusively use Adam's Polishes. Take a look at these videos to get an idea of what it takes. I can then point you in the right direction as far as which products of Adam's to use in place of the ones in the videos.

 

I will be doing a new video series on wet sanding featuring Adam's products in the very near future. Stay tuned!

 

 

 

Wet Sanding 101 - Part 1

 

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Wet Sanding 101 - Part 2

 

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Wet Sanding 101 - Conclusion

 

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This can be tricky. I have done quite a bit of wet sanding on classic car restorations over the years.

 

If you have a new base coat / clear coat paint job, then you would know from the painter how much clear is on the car. Usually there is a number of coats, so it is common to in steps wet sand with, say, 1200 grit, then 1500, then 2000, and finally a 3000 pad with an air tool. That would give you a near perfect, no orange peel finish. You then buff with quality polishing compounds (i.e.,3M) with foam pads, so you don't burn anything.

 

If you have a new factory car, then you have to be careful. I have done just the 3000 pad as a clean up type thing, then buffed. The 3000 pad removes very little clear and may be enough to get rid of most of the factory orange peel.

 

You can go to a good body shop and they have a sensor tool usually to show how many mils. of clear is on the car, so you have a safe starting point / opinion.

 

Hope this helps.

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This can be tricky. I have done quite a bit of wet sanding on classic car restorations over the years.

 

If you have a new base coat / clear coat paint job, then you would know from the painter how much clear is on the car. Usually there is a number of coats, so it is common to in steps wet sand with, say, 1200 grit, then 1500, then 2000, and finally a 3000 pad with an air tool. That would give you a near perfect, no orange peel finish. You then buff with quality polishing compounds (i.e.,3M) with foam pads, so you don't burn anything.

 

If you have a new factory car, then you have to be careful. I have done just the 3000 pad as a clean up type thing, then buffed. The 3000 pad removes very little clear and may be enough to get rid of most of the factory orange peel.

 

You can go to a good body shop and they have a sensor tool usually to show how many mils. of clear is on the car, so you have a safe starting point / opinion.

 

Hope this helps.

 

:iagree:

 

That's why I tell people not to try this at home!

 

 

Thanks for the help. I am sure I will have some more questions when I get started!!! Thanks again!!!

 

Make sure you have a look at this thread!

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