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Well I just watched the Adams Detailing Dvd..


AZGTO
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Well I just got done watching the Adams detailing dvd and it looks like I have found a solution to my fine scratches all over my GTO. I'm already addicted to Adams products but it looks like I'm going to be ordering the gen 2 maching polishing kit and the Americana Wax to put on top of the MSW...it looks like its going to take me 10-12 hours to do my car which in the az heat in my garage should be fun!

so adam you have another order coming your way this week...

Edited by AZGTO
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Well I just got done watching the Adams detailing dvd and it looks like I have found a solution to my fine scratches all over my GTO. I'm already addicted to Adams products but it looks like I'm going to be ordering the gen 2 maching polishing kit and the Americana Wax to put on top of the MSW...it looks like its going to take me 10-12 hours to do my car which in the az heat in my garage should be fun!

so adam you have another order coming your way this week...

 

Let me help your time estimations out just a tad. It will probably take you 10-12 hours over a couple of days to do your car. Tackle the car in sections. Get one panel completely correct before moving to the next, and then you can do the waxing all at one time. This is going to take time and work on a car the size of yours so don't think that you can knock it out in one day. It took me 3 days just to clay my entire car and it's much smaller than yours. Mind you I'm a slow worker but I am also very thorough.

 

Working in the shade is going to help your experience be a lot more pleasurable, as well as get you better results with the products (less flaking and product splatter). Get a cooler full of bottled water and a fan to keep you cool. I always enjoy the time I spend rubbing on my car so the time is of no essence for me.

 

Good luck and post some pictures when you are done! :2thumbs:

Edited by Junkman2008
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Let me help your time estimations out just a tad. It will probably take you 10-12 hours over a couple of days to do your car. Tackle the car in sections. Get one panel completely correct before moving to the next, and then you can do the waxing all at one time. This is going to take time and work on a car the size of yours so don't think that you can knock it out in one day. It took me 3 days just to clay my entire car and it's much smaller than yours. Mind you I'm a slow worker but I am also very thorough.

 

Working in the shade is going to help your experience be a lot more pleasurable, as well as get you better results with the products (less flaking and product splatter). Get a cooler full of bottled water and a fan to keep you cool. I always enjoy the time I spend rubbing on my car so the time is of no essence for me.

 

Good luck and post some pictures when you are done! :2thumbs:

 

Sounds good, nice suggestion...So if I say did my front of my car, hood, fenders, and front bumper, after I'm done with the machine polish would I put a quick coat of wax on it or would it be ok to wait a few days until I finish my whole car If I daily drive my car?

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It's difficult to spread the correction process over several days if the car is your daily driver. Wash and clay first, to get that out of the way, so that when you go to resume your work later you can give it a quick wash/dry or detail spray/wipedown and move straight to the Swirl&Haze Remover.

 

Do what Junkman said, and concentrate on one small area at a time. Patience is key. In your situation, I would suggest after you complete each panel, put a hand coat of Buttery Wax on the panel (if you have it, otherwise you can just use some other wax since it will only be temporary) to keep the surface protected while you continue to drive and work on your car at the same time.

 

Once you have finished correcting the entire car, you can wash with Dawn to remove the 'temporary' wax, and put down a coat of Machine Wax to seal the paint and give it better, longer-lasting protection. Then you can follow that with a coat of Americana for the ultimate shine.

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Yeah if your car is a DD I wouldn't jump through hoops making it absolutely perfect (it's up to you of course) because the daily grind is going to make you go insane trying.

 

I did the key spots like the hood and truck but my G8 is by no means perfect and it never will be. I'm not patient enough to spend an hour on one spot on my car. I hand wash it using all adams MF towels and products so it'll stay nice but will never be like junkmans (AJ's)

 

Needless to say you made the right decision coming here and you'll LOVE the Adams experience.

 

Good luck,

Chris

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Junkman has the right idea there... attempting to tackle 10-12 hours non-stop you'll start to get sloppy, it happens. I generally will take on the interior, wash, clay, and at least start my correction one day, then come back with a fresh set of eyes the following day.

 

Its weird, but when you come back to it the second day you'll see a number of things you missed towards the end of day 1 (at least I usually do).

 

Also that second day will fly by, especially if you get part of the way into your correction on day one. This works out nice b/c you can enjoy the pleasure of applying that final coat at a leisurely pace and still have enough time to take it for a drive when your done, take some pics, and actually appreciate all the work without being dog tired.

Edited by Dylan06SS
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It's difficult to spread the correction process over several days if the car is your daily driver. Wash and clay first, to get that out of the way, so that when you go to resume your work later you can give it a quick wash/dry or detail spray/wipedown and move straight to the Swirl&Haze Remover.

 

Do what Junkman said, and concentrate on one small area at a time. Patience is key. In your situation, I would suggest after you complete each panel, put a hand coat of Buttery Wax on the panel (if you have it, otherwise you can just use some other wax since it will only be temporary) to keep the surface protected while you continue to drive and work on your car at the same time.

 

Once you have finished correcting the entire car, you can wash with Dawn to remove the 'temporary' wax, and put down a coat of Machine Wax to seal the paint and give it better, longer-lasting protection. Then you can follow that with a coat of Americana for the ultimate shine.

 

I've done it both ways. Just as Gerry has suggested and I have corrected a panel and went back and waxed the next day or two after driving. You will find out that even after using Swirl and Haze remover only, water will bead on the car like it has 5 coats of sealant on it.

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Sounds good, nice suggestion...So if I say did my front of my car, hood, fenders, and front bumper, after I'm done with the machine polish would I put a quick coat of wax on it or would it be ok to wait a few days until I finish my whole car If I daily drive my car?

 

If it's your daily driver, trying to break it up would be a bit more difficult.

 

The best thing to do is find a weekend when you don't have to go anywhere. When you get home from work Friday night, wash the front part of the car. Hood, front fenders, front bumper. Then carefully clay these areas. Then break out the Porter Cable and begin using the Swirl and Haze Remover on the hood. Get it exactly how you want it. Then hit it with the Fine Machine Polish. (The FMP shouldn't be skipped, as it adds considerably to the shine and depth of the finish when you are done) Then apply a coat of MSW.

 

Depending on how bad the scratches on your vehicle are, just that section will be about a 4 hour job. A good way to kill time on a Friday night. Then on Saturday, work on the roof and doors. Sunday, the trunk and rear fenders.

 

You can do it all in one day, but a 15 hour marathon session isn't something I find to be particularly enjoyable. I've done it several times (and I did it again this past Saturday) but generally it's not the most pleasant experience in the world. If you have a garage you're well ahead of the game, as you can work when it is dark outside or when there is bad weather. It will also keep the finish cool which will allow you to work with the products more efficiently than a hot surface will.

 

If your finish is in pretty good shape it won't require hours of work to make one piece of sheet metal look spectacular. Generally the hood and the front bumpers get pounded the hardest from daily use. Doing the hood to your satisfaction should give you an idea of what you'll need to do on the rest of the vehicle.

 

EDIT --

 

To give you some idea, this is what the rear deck-lid of the project I worked on this weekend looked like before I used the Porter Cable:

 

reardeck1.jpg

 

I did three passes over it with SHR using fairly stiff pressure and the 6 setting, and then one pass with FMP on the 5 setting. Total time polishing was probably no more than 15 minutes. The end result was pretty good:

 

superwax2.jpg

MSWrear4.jpg

MSWrear2.jpg

Edited by carrya1911
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