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How long should it take?


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To do the entire process? Reading these posts, I see some folks taking 8-10 hours from wash to wax. I need my car to run errands and don't want to be in the middle of polishing and have to quit to run an errand...Could I DO that though? If necessary? then just pick up where I left off without doing damage?

 

Also, it's a 2010 Camaro only 6 months old. I took a good close look at the finish in the bright noonday sun and could barely make out tiny swirls few and far between... so I'm thinking maybe it won't take THAT much time, although there are 4-5 areas that will need a lot more attention..

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Usually when I do my truck... Wash, Buff, Wax and all the minor details it takes me about 7 or 8 hours and thats if I'm going fast. If I relax and sit back and have something to drink it takes me about 8 or 9 hours.

 

Its always better to take your time because if you dont you'll go somewhere the next day and you'll be look at your tire and part of it will be shiney and another part dull (been there done that) or miss spots of wax.

 

Just take your time. You can live 1 day without running around.

 

Just start drinking then you cant go anywhere.

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I just drive one of my other two cars or two bikes... lol

 

Honestly I'd pick a day and set aside time to get it done.

 

You can wash and wax a car in a couple hours. If you get all anal like a lot of us it'll take more time. You can split it up, but you'll have to waterless wash the car to get all the dust and dirt off of it before waxing.

 

Chris

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well normal non paint correction takes me a 3 hours give or take for exterior, interior, and engine. (its a daily driver so the engine gets dirty a lot). Now the paint correction & full detail I did on the Mazda took me 35 hours total over 3 days.. and it didnt move for any of those days.. Like Junkman says.. it takes as long as it takes..

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yeah, "it takes as long as it takes" is a pretty good motto to live by. Maybe you could do one or two panels at a time? If I'm just washing at waxing, plus tires and trim I can figure on 3 hours tops, but when correction is involved the time adds up quickly.

 

Keep in mind nothing says you have to do the whole car at once. More importantly don't stress on it, this is fun!

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Whoops, sorry Jason - great minds think alike...

 

To quote the Junkman, "It takes as long as it takes". :willy:

 

Yeah, I know, not much of a finite answer, but very true, as it depends on level of effort needed to get the finish to where you want it. The claying will take a bit of time initially (esp. if it is the first time), and will lay the foundation for the shine that will come. The hood, roof, and trunk lid will probably have the worst stuff on the finish.

 

If I can't complete the entire car in one session, I at least want to have one or more panels completed through (Clay, (SHR) FMP Wax). Then I can return the following weekend, wash and dry, and then work on the remaining panels.

 

A friend and I completely did her car exterior for the first time (by hand only) with no SHR, just (wash dry clay revive Americana (and VRT) ) and we spent the better part of 6+ hours on the first detail on her car.

 

And, although it had some slight swirling (not addressed), it still looked MUCH better and had a nice smooth and deep finish.

 

Another way to say it is to break the project down into smaller areas/panels and work that way if the time is short. Say, for example, clay the hood and front fenders, work them with FMP and white pad on the PC, wipe them down, and then put a coat of Buttery Wax or Machine Super Wax or Americana on those areas. Next time maybe the rest, or another group of panels. :)

 

And by the way bless you for your care of and for your Mom - not everyone does that .

Edited by Doug123
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To do the entire process? Reading these posts, I see some folks taking 8-10 hours from wash to wax. I need my car to run errands and don't want to be in the middle of polishing and have to quit to run an errand...Could I DO that though? If necessary? then just pick up where I left off without doing damage?

 

Also, it's a 2010 Camaro only 6 months old. I took a good close look at the finish in the bright noonday sun and could barely make out tiny swirls few and far between... so I'm thinking maybe it won't take THAT much time, although there are 4-5 areas that will need a lot more attention..

 

Hey Ironman - Here's a rule of thumb if used everytime I've started a project....."90 percent of the project takes 90 percent of the time, The other 10 percent of the project takes the other 90 percent of the time"

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Whoops, sorry Jason - great minds think alike...

 

To quote the Junkman, "It takes as long as it takes". :willy:

 

Yeah, I know, not much of a finite answer, but very true, as it depends on level of effort needed to get the finish to where you want it. The claying will take a bit of time initially (esp. if it is the first time), and will lay the foundation for the shine that will come. The hood, roof, and trunk lid will probably have the worst stuff on the finish.

 

If I can't complete the entire car in one session, I at least want to have one or more panels completed through (Clay, (SHR) FMP Wax). Then I can return the following weekend, wash and dry, and then work on the remaining panels.

 

A friend and I completely did her car exterior for the first time (by hand only) with no SHR, just (wash dry clay revive Americana (and VRT) ) and we spent the better part of 6+ hours on the first detail on her car.

 

And, although it had some slight swirling (not addressed), it still looked MUCH better and had a nice smooth and deep finish.

 

Another way to say it is to break the project down into smaller areas/panels and work that way if the time is short. Say, for example, clay the hood and front fenders, work them with FMP and white pad on the PC, wipe them down, and then put a coat of Buttery Wax or Machine Super Wax or Americana on those areas. Next time maybe the rest, or another group of panels. :)

 

And by the way bless you for your care of and for your Mom - not everyone does that .

 

 

THANKS! good info! I think I can set aside at least 8 hours saturday, then do the interior sunday..and thanks! it is an honor and privilege to care for my mom! she has dementia and some other issues, but she's still MY mom!!

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Hey Ironman - Here's a rule of thumb if used everytime I've started a project....."90 percent of the project takes 90 percent of the time, The other 10 percent of the project takes the other 90 percent of the time"

 

 

that makes a ton of sense-I'm a plastic modeler too, and this is SO true!!

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I detailed a Camaro this weekend in about 5 hours. However, it was me and a guy that I was introducing the products to, and it had glass t-tops, so no polishing there.

 

It really does depend on how bad it is and how good your technique is. I am sure Adam can turn swirl-city in a glimmering picutre of perfection in 8 hours. Some of us more casual guys may take 3 times as long.

 

Set smaller goals if you know you are going to be interrupted. Like: polish and wax from the windshield forward. Then the next time you are available, do the center of the car, etc..........

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To do the entire process? Reading these posts, I see some folks taking 8-10 hours from wash to wax. I need my car to run errands and don't want to be in the middle of polishing and have to quit to run an errand...Could I DO that though? If necessary? then just pick up where I left off without doing damage?

 

Also, it's a 2010 Camaro only 6 months old. I took a good close look at the finish in the bright noonday sun and could barely make out tiny swirls few and far between... so I'm thinking maybe it won't take THAT much time, although there are 4-5 areas that will need a lot more attention..

Depending on the amount of paint correction, it can take from 4-16 hours!Sure you can stop and start, if you would get dust on your paint just use DS and you will be ready too start again.

And the 4-5 areas you can use orange pad & SHR, the rest of the car use white pad & FMP.Enjoy Detailing!!:2thumbs:

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I spread mine out over two days for a serious detail. Wash and clay bar in the evening. Then get up early for polish, wax, glass and wheels. Ends up being about 7-8 hours, but it is so worth it. It's my hobby after all. BTW,I do the interior on a separate day.

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Hey Ironman - Here's a rule of thumb if used everytime I've started a project....."90 percent of the project takes 90 percent of the time, The other 10 percent of the project takes the other 90 percent of the time"

 

Mark, I cracked up out loud when I read that! That was funny and true! :2thumbs:

 

Here's the deal Gary. Like everyone here who has watched me do a detailing clinic has stated, it really does take as long as it takes. That answer is 100% correct for anyone who asks that question. But that is not the end of the answer. The end goes like this.

 

The process of removing all the damage from your paint is a one time event in the life of your paint. You should never have to repeat this entire process ever again. Here's why.

 

Before you go through all of the work necessary to fix your paint, you must have a thorough understanding of what caused the damage in the first place. From improper washing to improper methods to remove dust and dirt (things that I discuss in detail in The Junkman's Corner forum), these practices must stop so that you do not continue recreating the very damage that you are trying to remove. If you do not continue damaging the paint, you will never have to get as aggressive with your paint as you will need to in order to remove the damage the first time. Chew on that for a minute.

 

In reality, you are going to pick up some minor damage here and there, especially on a daily driver. However, THAT damage should be easily removed with the Fine Machine Polish (FMP). If you are needing to constantly repair your paint with the more aggressive Swirl & Haze Remover, then you are either doing something wrong when touching your paint or you need to park further out in the back 40. :willy:

 

So as you can see, the initial repair of your paint and the upkeep are going to be two, totally different experiences (the upkeep should be a fraction of the time that the initial correction took). Thus, learn what caused the damage you have first, and then tackle the correction. Also, you can work on one panel at a time, and make sure that you break up each panel into 2' square areas. That is the size of each area that you should tackle at a time.

 

Remember this. If you cannot successfully fix a 2' area, then you should not even dream of moving out of that area. If you apply a lousy or incorrect technique to one spot on the car, then your car will look like crap if you apply that same technique all over the car. Rome wasn't taken in a day. Perfect the car in 2' sections, one panel at a time. Refrain from damaging it again and you will successfully repair the paint in the amount of time that it takes. After all the paint is corrected, you can wax the entire car, or wax each panel as you finish it.

 

And remember, it will take as long as it takes. :)

 

 

 

I spent 11 hrs on the charger by hand and 8 hrs on my moms truck but I skipped a 3rd pass with SHR and completely skipped FMP so id guess its still gonna take 11-12 hrs on a truck.

 

Your marrow is kinda mid size and I'd tell someone it would be ready in 6-7 hrs if I went full bore.

 

You never want to skip FMP. That is what brings the shine back to the paint. FMP is like the final spit shine. Look at this trunk. You can clearly see where I have applied FMP and where I have just used SHR. FMP is a must do process. No way around it.

 

newport2.jpg

Edited by Junkman2008
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I skipped because it was my moms truck and I knew shed be washing it with s bath towel again in 2 weeks.

 

thud.gif

 

I do not detail for a living. The people that I do take care of are told up front. I will call you when it is done, you are welcome to come and watch, but do not ask me how long it will take.

 

I don't remember you coming by my garage.... :D

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Thanks y'all! Junkman, I'm bringing my laptop to the garage when I start, and will work along with your videos, JUST to be absolutely sure I'm doing each step correctly-it'll almost be like you're there with me!

 

I plan on washing the car, going to pick up my mom, returning home and claying the entire car, washing her again, then doing SWR, FMP then waxing her with MSW a 2'x2' section at a time...Is that right???

 

Being that it's forecast to be 95 degrees plus this weekend, I should be able to lose about 10 lbs in sweat, even in a big garage-think I'll go buy a nice BIG shop fan somewhere..thank GOODNESS I broke down and bought a little roll-around stool so I won't kill my knees. BUT I'm looking forward to it! Should be fun!! I'll try to post pics with my GOOD camera...

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Sounds like you've got a great plan. Only thing I would say is this: Once you perfect the entire routine and are happy with the results on your 2x2 area, then you can do each step on the whole care before moving to the next product. That is, of course, unless you feel you are going to run out of time. Then do the full treatment on one panel at a time.

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Thanks y'all! Junkman, I'm bringing my laptop to the garage when I start, and will work along with your videos, JUST to be absolutely sure I'm doing each step correctly-it'll almost be like you're there with me!

 

I plan on washing the car, going to pick up my mom, returning home and claying the entire car, washing her again, then doing SWR, FMP then waxing her with MSW a 2'x2' section at a time...Is that right???

 

Being that it's forecast to be 95 degrees plus this weekend, I should be able to lose about 10 lbs in sweat, even in a big garage-think I'll go buy a nice BIG shop fan somewhere..thank GOODNESS I broke down and bought a little roll-around stool so I won't kill my knees. BUT I'm looking forward to it! Should be fun!! I'll try to post pics with my GOOD camera...

 

First off, use this video series as your template. :2thumbs:

 

Start on a part of the car that requires no uncomfortable positioning. Don't start on a side panel or anything low. Pick a spot where you can comfortably stand and easily put enough light on in order to see what you are doing. When I say perfect one spot, here's what I mean.

 

1. Clay the entire panel. There's not much to claying to know if you are doing it right, or have completed the step. The baggie test will give you your answer.

 

2. Once the entire panel (hood, trunk) has been clayed, start your swirl and scratch removal with SHR in your 2 foot area. You may want to first mask it off with painter's tape so that your area doesn't grow, as that always seems to happen.

 

3. Once you get all the damage out of that area (or you are at least satisfied with the results), apply and work the FMP.

 

4. Once you are done with FMP, remove the tape and compare that area with the areas adjacent to it. If there is no difference, then go watch my videos again and repeat the process (you shouldn't have to clay again as the baggie test should have told you whether or not to move on).

 

If there is a significant difference that you are very pleased with, then finish the rest of the car with a complete claying, then a complete treatment of SHR, and then a complete treatment of FMP. MSW (or the wax of your choice) will be the final step.

 

The initial 2X2 foot area is to see that you have the proper technique to move on. The last thing you want to do is apply a lousy technique to the entire car. That's why you only want to clay 1 panel the first time that you do this as claying alone can wear you out. So just clay one panel and get it perfect. That will be the palette that you will use to develop and perfect the process and your technique.

 

One mistake that novices seem to always make is the use of too much product. I can do quite a few cars with one bottle of SHR. If you are through half that bottle on half of the car, you may as well be squirting that stuff down the drain because you are using way too much product. I've only seen one case where someone didn't use enough. The problem with applying too much polish is that the polish will fill up the tiny holes in the pads. Those holes are what causes the pad to cut. If you clog the holes with polish, then the pad will no longer cut and at that point you are doing nothing but exercising (and some lousy exercise at that). Use a squirt or two of detail spray on the pads if the product starts to dust up. If the product starts to flake (big chunks), you are using WAY too much product and probably have the polisher turned up way to high (you should never go faster than 5).

 

If it is as hot as you say it is, do two things. Drink plenty of water (not beer or anything else), as you work. This will help keep you refreshed and keep you from getting sloppy. Also, always work in the shade. Although I do this in direct sunlight at the shows, I have had a little practice. It is NOT my preferred way to do this.

 

Remember, Adam and I have two, totally different techniques. They cannot be mixed together as his technique is almost opposite of mine. Pick one and stick with it. They both work, his just works faster and it wears you out sooner as you are doing a lot of the work. Mine won't wear you out, but it takes longer as you are letting the polisher do all the work. It's just a question of how much you want to sweat. :)

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First off, use this video series as your template. :2thumbs:

 

Start on a part of the car that requires no uncomfortable positioning. Don't start on a side panel or anything low. Pick a spot where you can comfortably stand and easily put enough light on in order to see what you are doing. When I say perfect one spot, here's what I mean.

 

1. Clay the entire panel. There's not much to claying to know if you are doing it right, or have completed the step. The baggie test will give you your answer.

 

2. Once the entire panel (hood, trunk) has been clayed, start your swirl and scratch removal with SHR in your 2 foot area. You may want to first mask it off with painter's tape so that your area doesn't grow, as that always seems to happen.

 

3. Once you get all the damage out of that area (or you are at least satisfied with the results), apply and work the FMP.

 

4. Once you are done with FMP, remove the tape and compare that area with the areas adjacent to it. If there is no difference, then go watch my videos again and repeat the process (you shouldn't have to clay again as the baggie test should have told you whether or not to move on).

 

If there is a significant difference that you are very pleased with, then finish the rest of the car with a complete claying, then a complete treatment of SHR, and then a complete treatment of FMP. MSW (or the wax of your choice) will be the final step.

 

The initial 2X2 foot area is to see that you have the proper technique to move on. The last thing you want to do is apply a lousy technique to the entire car. That's why you only want to clay 1 panel the first time that you do this as claying alone can wear you out. So just clay one panel and get it perfect. That will be the palette that you will use to develop and perfect the process and your technique.

 

One mistake that novices seem to always make is the use of too much product. I can do quite a few cars with one bottle of SHR. If you are through half that bottle on half of the car, you may as well be squirting that stuff down the drain because you are using way too much product. I've only seen one case where someone didn't use enough. The problem with applying too much polish is that the polish will fill up the tiny holes in the pads. Those holes are what causes the pad to cut. If you clog the holes with polish, then the pad will no longer cut and at that point you are doing nothing but exercising (and some lousy exercise at that). Use a squirt or two of detail spray on the pads if the product starts to dust up. If the product starts to flake (big chunks), you are using WAY too much product and probably have the polisher turned up way to high (you should never go faster than 5).

 

If it is as hot as you say it is, do two things. Drink plenty of water (not beer or anything else), as you work. This will help keep you refreshed and keep you from getting sloppy. Also, always work in the shade. Although I do this in direct sunlight at the shows, I have had a little practice. It is NOT my preferred way to do this.

 

Remember, Adam and I have two, totally different techniques. They cannot be mixed together as his technique is almost opposite of mine. Pick one and stick with it. They both work, his just works faster and it wears you out sooner as you are doing a lot of the work. Mine won't wear you out, but it takes longer as you are letting the polisher do all the work. It's just a question of how much you want to sweat. :)

 

Thanks AJ! This answered a LOT of questions! I'm gonna use YOUR method..but what about hard to reach places and mirrors? My Camaro doesn't have body moulding so I don't have to worry about that, but the front has a lot of smaller areas around the grill and between the mirrors and body, in general, places that the PC can't reach-I'm thinking just hand polish and wax those areas right??

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Thanks AJ! This answered a LOT of questions! I'm gonna use YOUR method..but what about hard to reach places and mirrors? My Camaro doesn't have body moulding so I don't have to worry about that, but the front has a lot of smaller areas around the grill and between the mirrors and body, in general, places that the PC can't reach-I'm thinking just hand polish and wax those areas right??

 

Here's what I use. You can attach them to your PC. :thumbsup:

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