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Toyota White Paint and Coating


Mariner
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So I discovered a few days ago that the "super white" paint color on my Toyota 4Runner is actually a single stage paint with a clear mixed in. The result of this means it's really susceptible to damage. I can attest to that because I've clayed the vehicle a couple times and I can already see extensive swirling, and the vehicle isn't even a year old yet.

 

I also have a few rock chips and scuffs that go right down to bare plastic or paint, resulting in minor rust.

 

After talking to Dan Wolf, I've decided to coat the vehicle. Originally I was against coatings because I felt it took away from my detailing experience, but it appears as if I may not have a choice.

 

So after I touch up my paint damage, I'll be installing a full trim and paint ceramic.

 

Any thoughts, experiences, or tips on coatings are extremely welcome as I'm a little nervous about the installation.

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Nothing to really be nervous about.  The secret to the coating is taking your time in the prep stage.  You want the paint as clean and flawless as you can possibly get it.  Once the coating goes on, the only way to remove it is with a polisher.  Work slowly with the coating and know it's going to be somewhat of a lengthy process.  You can make the process go faster if you work with a second installer and get in sync with each other, but that's not always practical. 

 

There are some good reviews here of people who have installed the coatings.  I started a write-up myself on the process as I put a coating on my garage queen (the project will be done sometime next week, but the prep is started).  Feel free to read, look and ask questions.

 

Go slow.  Prep thoroughly.  Even though the kit comes with quite a bit of prep, I keep a second 16 ounce bottle around just so I never feel like I have to conserve to have enough.  I'd rather have enough prep to cover an area a few times until I'm satisfied it's perfect.  You can handle this.

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Just did a Nissan Murano this past week that was silver. It was really easy to do. Don't let it intimidate you. The worst part is on a super light color the "rainbow affect" is kind of hard to see and if it is cool where you are applying the coating it does take a good 30 seconds to a minute for this to appear. Just go slow and make sure you wipe it off good. I did get a spot or two were I didn't get it wiped off and could see the streak marks. I used a little brilliant glaze and it seemed to fix it. It really was no harder to do than a traditional wax job. The prep is really the key get it super clean and it will go great.  

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You can still polish single stage paint, it's just much softer and usually uses less aggressive technique to do so.  Starting with the least aggressive methods is usually the preferred system anyway.  I'd start with a fine polish and see if that clears it up enough to your liking.  Just know that you will see paint transfer to the pads since there's no independent clear coat layer.

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Cool guys, thanks for the reassurance. I think I'm more worried about the prep portion really. I haven't watched the videos in entirety yet, but I have read some reviews. I have a few weeks on the boat to think about it before it can happen.

 

 

Do you know if the Toyota Blizzard Pearl is the same? AKA, is this a single stage paint as well? I'm trying to look at some Toyota forums to get a feel for this before I go and try to polish it up. :)

I'm not sure.. you can ask your dealership though and they can tell you

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You can still polish single stage paint, it's just much softer and usually uses less aggressive technique to do so.  Starting with the least aggressive methods is usually the preferred system anyway.  I'd start with a fine polish and see if that clears it up enough to your liking.  Just know that you will see paint transfer to the pads since there's no independent clear coat layer.

will this paint transfer come out of your pads so you can use them for different vehicles? or are you basically stuck using those pads only for that vehicle once you use them.

 

I too have a super white Toyota I need to polish as well as a black Toyota.  so just wondering if I need separate pads for both vehicles.

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As long as the pads are cleaned well you should be fine. Some staining might remain but that doesn't effect performance, at least it hasn't in my personal experiences. I have a few white pads that are for cutting that have a dark stain to them all the time but they work flawlessly

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I agree with Dan above that it shouldn't affect performance.  That being said, having multiple sets of pads laying around is never a bad idea.  You never know when one may have a failure or become so dirty that it's no longer doing it's job.  I know I keep multiple pads for each polisher in the drawer "just in case." It's cheap insurance that I'll be able to finish the job and that I have options available if needed.

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I have a 2016 Super white Toyota Tundra also. I strip washed, clayed with waterless wash, polished with my Swirl Killer "santa got it for me" using a black pad form the other guy's, then applied Adams liquid paint sealant with a red pad from the other guy's. I didn't have any paint transfer.

 

 I really don't think you have anything to worry about, I used medium pressure when buffing. I've done a couple of other white toyota models also and havent noticed any transfer on those either.

 

-Jason

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On single stage, coating can sometimes be a little 'tricky'. They can tend to be 'blotchy', so do a test spot first to make sure you achieve the desired results. Even application is critical IMO.

 

Let us now how you make out!

Great to know, thanks!!

 

I'll post pics when I finish. Hoping to do it during my next hitch home

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So I took advantage of this awesome Florida "winter" and applied the Trim Coating today. Overall, it was a successful venture and I hope it looks as good tomorrow as it did tonight. I luckily had my fiancée's help, so we had a sweet system down. She applied the Coating Prep after I applied TRC. As I applied the Coating, she followed up behind me with a single soft and Brilliant Glaze. The hardest part for me was creating an even application on the mud flaps. I had to do a couple coats but the end result was great. The cowl came out really well, which was my number one concern because it's always splotched with water spots. I applied the CTC on the rubber window seals with the windows down, and that of course saved a lot of clean up. I currently don't have the capacity to remove tires so the wheel wells will be done another day.

 

Overall, a great experience. The only concern I had is the applicator can't get into small places, but that was mainly my fault for not realizing that sooner and having some sort of smaller applicator available.

 

I wanted to take some pictures but since my vehicle is a 2016, the trim pretty much looks the same, just maybe a tiny bit darker.

 

Special thanks to Dan Wolf for answering every single question I've had along the way, and to everyone else for their comments and advice. Next up, Paint Coating!

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So the good venture turned unfortunately bad. Toyota owners should especially heed this. My B pillars and plastic trim pillars on either side of the rear window are a NOT CTC friendly. They cured for approximately 40-44 hours, at which I had to use my SUV for an emergency run to town in some light rain. The lower trim and mudflaps were fine, but all the pillars exhibited a very splotchy/dotting finish. They had been given the same scrubbing regiment as all the rest of the trim, and had not yielded the same results. With the helpful advice from the Adam's staff, I was able to remove the spots with some vigorous scrubbing with TRC. At this point, I don't see it wise to attempt the coating again. I've attached a picture for viewing, as this is what I saw this morning after I wiped away the rain. I am aware there has been great success with Adam's CTC and I am viewing this as an isolated instance. And again, Adam's staff has been very helpful in getting the Trim set right.

 

post-14423-0-41171000-1487795664_thumb.jpgpost-14423-0-81163400-1487795688_thumb.jpg

 

However, I have decided not to apply the Paint Coating after all and to just stick with the fail safe Paint Sealant and HGG combo. If I decide I want a coating again in the future, I'll just pay someone to apply one.

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In working with Dustin to address this situation, the strange thing was that these pillar trim pieces looked fine after the Trim Coating was applied, but the next day, the surface of the plastic felt greasy, and if touched a fingerprint would be left.  All the rest of the plastic trim did not have this issue, just the door pillars.

 

I suggested that he let the coating cure out another day. It was not until this second day that the trim got wet, and showed the splotchy appearance.

 

This indicated to me that something had interfered with the curing process, and the coating had not properly cured.

 

Based on what I know of the preparation that was done, my assumption is that these particular plastic pieces may be more porous than the other plastics on the truck, and that the Coating Prep had soaked into the plastics and had not completely dried before the coating was applied.

 

In addition, the fact that the TRC was able to remove the splotchiness, would also support the assumption that the coating had not fully cured. 

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In addition to Dan's above informative explanation, I have since then scrubbed the pillars twice more with TRC, and made a run back into town in the rain. The result is it looks the same as before I applied the coating. So we're all in agreement that the coating prep prevented the coating from bonding due to the porosity of the plastic, and even after 2 days, I was able to scrub the coating right off.

 

If anybody else experiences the same visual effects, then now perhaps you'll have an easy explanation. Now that it's all taken care of, I'll chalk this up as a learning experience and continue to be a happy Adam's customer :)

Edited by Mariner
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