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New police cars... cool, I must admit.


Marylander
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The new caprice scares me. One of my buddies is a cop and we both accelerated briskly, (no we were not racing that is illegal on public roads ;)), from a stop sign one night and his crown vic was in my rear view mirror. If he gets one of these new caprices we will be a pretty even match. At least I can mod my car. He can't mod his cruiser so that will just give me an excuse to finally get the tune I have been eying up.

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Around here we have this thing called snow. AWD > RWD. Not to mention Ford has a bit more experience making cop cars ;)

 

Shane, I agree with you on that. The same here (snow). I prefer AWD or FWD over RWD in the snow. I learned how to dry in the snow with a RWD and do not want to go back to those days.

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I think that the Chevy is on the G8 platform.:burnout:

 

True as far as what I've been reading. It will be called the Caprice.

http://www.leftlanenews.com/chevrolet-caprice-police-patrol-vehicle.html

 

Lookin good but .................. I like the Charger Cop Car :jester:

Ford and Chevy won't want to give up their share of the police car market.

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Read the specs on the Ford and you'll see they did their homework. Things like being able to reuse the cage/divider from the Crown Vics is HUGE for dept's. trying to save moola!

 

Copied and pasted from http://www.Autoblog.com:

This isn't the first time the Taurus has been offered in law enforcement guise. Back in the late '80s and early '90s, a special service package was available and featured prominently as the preferred ride in RoboCop. But aside from that celluloid appearance, those Tauruses didn't really have a full interceptor configuration. First-generation cop Tauruses got beefier brakes and cooling systems, but the powertrain was not up to the task of high-speed highway pursuits.

 

With the Taurus now assuming the mantle of top cop at Ford, things are a bit different this time around. There were some big hurdles to overcome since police agencies generally shy away from unibody designs like the Taurus over durability concerns. Ford president Mark Fields emphasized that the engineering teams worked closely with police agencies to build a car that met their needs. As such, the unibody structure of the Police Interceptor has been upgraded to meet twice the body durability requirements of the Crown Vic model, which should help alleviate some of the concerns of police agencies.

 

Safety is job 1 for police cars and Ford has developed the new Police Interceptor to withstand a 75-mile-per-hour rear collision. Fields claimed the car is the first in the industry to meet this standard. The Police Interceptor also retains all of the standard electronic stability and roll stability control systems featured in the Taurus. The systems, however, have been re-calibrated to meet the needs of police use.

 

As Jake and Elwood said, a cop car needs a cop motor, cop brakes and cop suspension. As we speculated earlier today, the Police Interceptor will get two powertrain options. The base model gets the 3.5-liter V6 found in other Tauruses with over 263 horsepower and 250+ lb-ft of torque. This naturally aspirated 3.5-liter engine is flex-fuel capable and gets 25-percent better fuel efficiency than the 4.6-liter V8 in the Crown Vic. The base models are available with either front- or all-wheel-drive. The top end pursuit version of the new Police Interceptor gets the full SHO powertrain including its 365-hp twin-turbo EcoBoost 3.5-liter V6 and all-wheel-drive as standard.

 

The Police Interceptor's brakes also have 60 percent more swept area than a standard Taurus and 20 percent more thermal mass to help resist fade. While police officers have generally favored rear-wheel-drive cars for their handling characteristics, Ford officials claim the newly calibrated stability control has been tuned to meet their needs.

 

Inside Ford has optimized the standard Taurus interior for Police Interceptor duty with new seats claimed to offer better comfort while easing egress with smaller lateral bolsters. They even have cut-outs for police-issue utility belts. The transmission shifter has also been moved from the console to the steering column to make room for all the gear that today's officers require be mounted in the center. Ford has even maintained the same nine-inch width between the seats to allow existing equipment to be mounted from older Crown Vic Interceptors. The switches on the steering wheel can also be re-mapped to control extra aftermarket equipment like lights, sirens and spot-lights.

The Police Interceptor's back seat has a new roomier bench to make getting prisoners in and out easier. The rear door panels have also been slimmed down to make entry/exit easier and they swing out an extra-wide 71 degrees,10 degrees more than a regular Taurus.

The Taurus is not the only new Police Interceptor coming from Ford this year. Fields promised a second un-named vehicle, though did say it would share most parts with the Taurus and be available in a utility version. That indicates it will be either the Flex or the new Explorer, both of which are based on the same platform as the Taurus.

 

Ford hasn't announced pricing for the new Police Interceptor yet, though did promise it will be price competitive with the outgoing Crown Vic and other vehicles in the segment. Service costs are another issue. Police agencies like the Crown Vic because they can easily swap out banged up body panels. Ford has worked closely with police agencies to keep service costs down on these new models as well. It will also work with agencies to help them upgrade their service facilities to straighten damaged unibodies, a process that is very different from straightening a body-on-frame vehicle.

 

The new Police Interceptor launches in late 2011, so don't worry about seeing a Taurus glowing blue and red in your rearview mirror just yet.

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The g8 can do everything better then the sho can.

 

biggest thing i see the SHO having the advantage in is all weather use. AWD vs RWD. other thing will be fuel consumption. The SHO makes same horse as the v8 but is supposed to off better fuel economy and like i said will have the option of awd. Only time will tell which works out better. Each car will work better than the other for certain departments.

Edited by SaleenJOE
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biggest thing i see the SHO having the advantage in is all weather use. AWD vs RWD. other thing will be fuel consumption. The SHO makes same horse as the v8 but is supposed to off better fuel economy and like i said will have the option of awd. Only time will tell which works out better. Each car will work better than the other for certain departments.

 

Either way dosent really mater what car they pick.

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Either way dosent really mater what car they pick.

 

:iagree:

Especially for local governments that have no or limited need to be out on the highway. The base motor is still plenty fast for around town, and most local govts (and taxpayers) would love to be seeing lower fuel costs.

 

Around here the city (and I think county) police have a bunch of chargers; most are V6 models.

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