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Dumb drill question


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I have a cheap $50 12v black and decker drill. I tried the 4in focus backing plate to fix a deeper scratch and as expected, the drill is not fast enough to do anything other than wasting my time.

 

So I'm in the market for another drill. I'm not a handyman at all, I probably drilled 2 holes in my life. I just want something that is fast enough for correcting purposes.

 

What should I look for in the specs to achieve my goal? 18v, 20v??

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Since you don't use the drill much, maybe save some money and get a corded drill.

 

Dewalt DWE1014 3/8-Inch 0-2800 RPM VS Drill with Keyed Chuck https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FI0NQO4/ref=cm_sw_r_other_awd_VwwdxbQYD03G7

I bought that one as it was the cheapest and that's all I need. It is quite a bit more powerful than most drill though. Most very good $300-$500 cordless drills are in the 1800 RPM range, should I be worried about it being too powerful?

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I bought that one as it was the cheapest and that's all I need. It is quite a bit more powerful than most drill though. Most very good $300-$500 cordless drills are in the 1800 RPM range, should I be worried about it being too powerful?

 

I would not think that the RPMs are too high, or that the drill is too powerful.

 

HOWEVER, any time you are using a drill to polish a small area you need to use caution to make sure you don't over-polish and strike-through the clear coat, or get the paint too hot. 

 

Also, since that drill has a variable speed trigger, you can using lower RPMs to fit the situation.

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Just be very wary about spending too much time in one small area at a time. You do not want to generate a lot of heat. If you have multiple scratches you want to correct using the drill, I recommend you do a pass on one and move to the next, then the next and rotate through them until they are all corrected. This will help avoid burning your clearcoat. When you are working on one area, make sure you keep the drill moving, the last thing you want to do is focus on a stubborn spot and causing more damage than you can correct. As far as too powerful, you shouldn't have anything to worry about as long as you do keep it moving and stop frequently to check your progress.

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