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John707

Need help with choosing best products for my situation

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Good morning everyone. I just purchased a new 2019 pearl white Chevy Tahoe and want to get this thing fully detailed inside and out. I have researched and came to conclusion Adam's is the products I want to use. Heck, even the official Chevrolet website sells/recommends them so they must be awesome!

 

My short intro---I use to work detail at a Ford dealership in my early 20s for a few years. Flash forward 15 years I know am married with a 6/5/2 year olds. Lets just say life is hectic right now! And time I will have to complete my exterior detail is limited.

 

What I am looking for is the quickest but best way to clay and wax the exterior. I was leaning on Adams medium clay mitt but the waxes I am lost. I do want to clay, polish, and then seal the paint for sure. I don't think my budget includes an electric polisher so I may be stuck doing by hand unless there are a super budget friendly polisher on the market? 

 

Any recommendations please? Thank you all! 

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Hi John! Welcome to the forum! You came to the right place!

 

I agree with the Chevrolet dealership! Adam's is my favorite for sure.

 

I want to recommend you looking into Sealants (Paint Sealant topped with H20 Guard and Gloss look awesome on white) or Ceramic Coatings (these look awesome on anything). Since you have limited time, it may help in the long run, since the protection is more robust and has much better longevity as compared to wax. I personally prefer ceramic coatings, I think they are the best protection on the market. They make future washes much easier and quicker, and its pretty simple to keep your car looking great! 

 

The only thing is the initial application will take effort and time, from then on, washing will be quicker because dirt and grime dont like to stick to the surface of a coating, and drying will be quicker since water also doesn't like to stick and will be flying off the vehicle like crazy.

 

Please feel free to ask as many questions as you have, people on here are very responsive and willing to help!

 

See the write up below for better information to help you decide what you may prefer.

 

Edited by Yo-Yo Ma's Cousin

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Ok I think I am leaning on that paint sealant you linked seems awesome. Now is this something I would apply after a clay session? Or I would still need to polish beforehand? 

 

The ceramics look very interesting as well! So many darn options lol. 

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Yes Clay/Polish/Protect is still applicable!

 

So, I would recommend You buying one of the starter kits, something like this . I recommend you search and do some research on what kind of things you'll need but something like this is a good start. It has a bucket your wash media and soap, detail spray (what got me started) which is great and you can use as a clay lubricant with the clay provided, with a few towels and brushes. H20 Guard and Gloss is also included which was what I recommend you use for maintenence washes around once a month. It's truly an incredible product.

 

Anyways, You for the actual process-

 

1.  I always like to do tires and wheels since they are the dirtiest part of the car. and they make a big difference to keep shiny.

2.  Wash thoroughly with the car shampoo

3. Use Iron Remover (This is to decontaminate your car, you'll be surprised all the junk that ends up embedded in your clear coat even with a new car. It's especially evident in white paint)

4. Use Clay bar with Detail Spray as lubricant

5. Polish if you choose to. Use Correcting Polish with Orange Hex Grip Pad or Finishing Polish with Orange Hex Grip Pad. Or use Revive Hand Polish

6. Apoply Paint Sealant

 

 

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Awesome I will do this! I see on amazon the polish comes as a kit with 2 different polishes. For a brand new vehicle I wonder if I should do both polishes or to save time maybe just the finishing polish and move on the the sealant?

 

Edit: just saw on amazon the hand polish I may just buy this one! 

Edited by John707

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The polishing will depend on the condition of your paint. Always do a test spot (2x2 section on your hood works well) and start with the least aggressive (Revive Hand Polish). If you think you need something more aggressive move your way up (Finishing Polish -> Correcting Polish -> Heavy Correcting Compound) until you are satisfied with the results you're getting. This is to avoid cutting too much clear coat unnecessarily. Since your vehicle is new, the paint is more than likely in good condition, so you probably won't need more than the first two listed. See Adams Polishes youtube channel. They have great tutorials. They especially have great tutorials for paint correction.

 

Yes of course, that would be a great idea! Just so you know you don't want to use Paint Sealant on any of the trim or glass - just on paint. Then you can use H20 GG on almost every exterior surface. I just did a white vehicle this weekend with paint sealant and followed up with H20 GG. It's going to look better than when you bought it. Here are some pics:

2E44AC91-8008-465B-AAE1-339745E27E87.thumb.jpeg.ca27bb2174d2e6c702a75b5e374fb193.jpeg

 

5F5E207B-CE67-4F46-97B3-9091126CE287.thumb.jpeg.e1014acda84249cb2cfe53ba627a1d97.jpeg

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Looks amazing!!! 

 

I am reading reviews on Amazon on the Adam's iron remover spray. I am very concerned about some reviews of it leaving irreversible streaks on plastic trim/headlights. Think just doing the clay bar will be good enough instead of using the Iron remover beforehand? 

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Ok here is my plan let me know if ok to do. My wife works weekends so I have daddy duty with the 3 kids no time to spend 1 whole day doing the truck. Weekdays after work will have to do.

 

1st day - wash and clay truck. Park in garage 

2nd day - polish/sealant

 

I wonder if I should buy a duster to dust off before polish/sealant hmmmm. I'll have it in garage after 1st day though.

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37 minutes ago, John707 said:

Ok here is my plan let me know if ok to do. My wife works weekends so I have daddy duty with the 3 kids no time to spend 1 whole day doing the truck. Weekdays after work will have to do.

 

1st day - wash and clay truck. Park in garage 

2nd day - polish/sealant

 

I wonder if I should buy a duster to dust off before polish/sealant hmmmm. I'll have it in garage after 1st day though.

 

NEVER EVER use a duster on your car unless you want to spend the rest of your life polishing out the fine scratches left behind. 

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Alright Rich duster is nixed! Lol

 

Since I am storing inside garage would it be safe to just go to town on the polish/sealant on day 2? 

 

Also I was planning on buying the Adam's car shampoo to wash for step 1 but now I am thinking to use the Adams all purpose cleaner. Being a new vehicle I doubt there is anything to strip off the paint but maybe everything will adhere better if I use the APC verses the car shampoo?

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54 minutes ago, John707 said:

Alright Rich duster is nixed! Lol

 

Since I am storing inside garage would it be safe to just go to town on the polish/sealant on day 2? 

 

Also I was planning on buying the Adam's car shampoo to wash for step 1 but now I am thinking to use the Adams all purpose cleaner. Being a new vehicle I doubt there is anything to strip off the paint but maybe everything will adhere better if I use the APC verses the car shampoo?


You should use waterless wash and a waffle weave microfiber towel to remove the dust. You can use detail spray if you are in a pinch. 


I would advice against that starter kit. I was never a fan of the kits. Most the time it seems like they add stuff you don't need and skimp on the important things. For instance that kit only comes with one bottle of detail spray? That will last you half of your Tahoe. Also, it comes with wheel and fender brushes, but no wheel or all purpose cleaner?  Two wash pads, but one bucket?  

Wash, clay, and seal/wax is your best bang for the time and money... I'd recommend the following:

If you want to clean the wheels, get yourself some All purpose cleaner, tire and rubber cleaner, and the wheel and fender brushes. 

1. Car shampoo, wash pad, and bucket with grit guard. 
2. Clay bar and, get yourself the gallon of detail spray. You'll go through it the fastest. 
3. Hand polish if need be, but you probably won't be able to see a huge difference on a new car for your time and money TBH.
4. Seal with Liquid paint sealant. 

Edited by Sandalwood

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3 hours ago, John707 said:

Awesome thanks for the input. Would I need to rewash the Tahoe after claying? 

I'm going to give you another thread to review about preparing your vehicle:

 

This thread has some good questions and recommendations on the process and some options.

Edited by RayS

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44 minutes ago, John707 said:

Awesome thanks for the input. Would I need to rewash the Tahoe after claying? 

Hey John, so what @Sandalwood was suggesting (I think) is using detail spray or waterless wash right before you get to work on the second day before you polish just to get rid of the dust that make have built up  and give you a clean surface to polish. 

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Ray that was a great read! I am heavily leaning on the clay mitt but scared of marring as I never used a clay mitt before. I don't have an electric buffer to remove any marring I might cause with the mitt.

 

I was thinking of clay mitt plus the detail spray and should be much quicker and hopefully not produce any marring. Then will be doing the revive hand polish and sealant after claying. 

Edited by John707

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9 minutes ago, Yo-Yo Ma's Cousin said:

Hey John, so what @Sandalwood was suggesting (I think) is using detail spray or waterless wash right before you get to work on the second day before you polish just to get rid of the dust that make have built up  and give you a clean surface to polish. 

 

Awesome I will do this. Would the detail spray or waterless wash create a coat on the paint before I work on the polish/wax making it less effective? 

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1 minute ago, John707 said:

 

Awesome I will do this. Would the detail spray or waterless wash create a coat on the paint before I work on the polish/wax making it less effective? 

Waterless wash would be preferable. Because detail spray has a little bit of protection built in, but it should still work fine. Adam’s recommends using detail spray during the polishing process to prime your pads.

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3 minutes ago, Yo-Yo Ma's Cousin said:

Waterless wash would be preferable. Because detail spray has a little bit of protection built in, but it should still work fine. Adam’s recommends using detail spray during the polishing process to prime your pads.

 

That's right, I just watched one of the Adam's youtube videos and he used the detail spray on the pad to prime. I am leaning on the detail spray only because I am buying a gallon of it and it will save me from buying the waterless wash for now. 

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May be a dumb question but are you guys also claying/polishing/sealing the door jams/trunk jams/hood jams?

 

Also I just watched the youtube video on Adams clay mitt. He stated micro scratching is a possibility.  Should I not be worried since I am polishing after the clay Mitt anyways?

Edited by John707

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Hi John,

I am a newbie doing my own cars and went thru the same thing.  I was afraid to touch my new car.  Once finished, I am extremely happy with the results.

 

I ended up:

Strip Wash

Visco Clay w/ Detail Spray

Revive Polish 

Paint Sealant

Brilliant Glaze

Americana Wax

(Will follow up with H2O after this Saturday's California opening)

 

I just did my in-laws car and it was an older car with scratches.  I used a machine polisher and not only are the scratches gone, I think it looks better than my new car.  In about 8-10 months when the paint sealant is gone, I will machine polish my new car.

 

I left my in-laws car out overnight and a day, and I wiped it down with some detail spray before I started polishing.  I didn't have Waterless Wash and am hoping/assuming the polishing removed and detail spray left on.

I used the Correction and then the Finishing Polish.  I can't express how pleased I am.  Both of them seem mild enough that there doesn't seem to be much risk for someone new like myself.

 

To answer your last question, I did NOT do the jams as they don't normally see weather and it seemed like a lot of work with all the small creases and hard to reach areas.  (And I don't see them as much)

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Thanks csk for the reply and info! Yah this Tahoe is large enough I am really debating on hitting all the jams or not. Maybe I'll just ceramic coat jams call it a day lol.

Edited by John707

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1 hour ago, John707 said:

Thanks csk for the reply and info! Yah this Tahoe is large enough I am really debating on hitting all the jams or not. Maybe I'll just ceramic coat jams call it a day lol.

When it comes to the door jams and area around the hatch, you can always do them later.  You want to make sure you have plenty of time to take care of the vehicle and not get rushed because you are tired or it is getting late.   I have even done 1/2 a vehicle one day and the other half the next, but you always make sure you do an entire side if you have to do that.

 

A few things to keep in mind:

1. Always use the least aggressive method possible.

2. Do test spots, including using the baggie test before you clay.

3. Don't try to be achieve perfection, if you can't see it from 3 feet away it is good enough - you'll get better over time.

4. Do small areas at a time, guaranteed that trying to tackle the entire hood in one shot will overwork you, frustrate you and come out less than desirable.

5. Take breaks and admire your work.

6. Keep notes of what you did and how you did it, you'll appreciate it in three or six months when you want to repeat the process.

7. Temperature and humidity changes throughout the day and have a big impact on the cure or drying time.

 

Finally, take lots of picture, before , during and after and share them on the forum.

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2 hours ago, John707 said:

Thanks csk for the reply and info! Yah this Tahoe is large enough I am really debating on hitting all the jams or not. Maybe I'll just ceramic coat jams call it a day lol.

I agree with @RayS he made some great suggestions.

 

Door jamba may be a good idea to protect, but I would make protecting the exterior a priority since it’s exposed to the sun and road grime

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