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Okay to Wax/Glaze on Non-Clayed Surface?


Luken10
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Hey guys I tried searching but couldn't find anything. Is it okay to apply brilliant glaze or/and a wax without claying the paint? I have friends and clients that don't have the time/money for a full paint correction and just want some extra shine and a wax to protect their paint until they can do the full correction.

 

I wouldn't think it would do any harm, and I feel like it would be a good idea to protect the paint until the next full detail.

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Claying does not do anything with regards to a "full paint correction". That terminology refers to removing scratches and swirls, but I do understand your question.

 

While you certainly CAN, I don't think I WOULD. Claying the entire vehicle doesn't take a whole ton of time to begin with and by doing so, you ensure that you won't be inducing any additional defects while you're rubbing all over it. See if they can srping for another 20 bucks or so and advise them that it's not good to just put a top coat over existing embedded dirt.

 

- Darryl

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Alot of my friends and clients have FILTHY cars which take literally almost the entire bar of clay. In turn that takes quite a long time to actually clay the whole car. Sometimes at that point in time claying really isn't an option.

 

So how much damage do you think would be done by putting wax on the car? Is it worth it to protect the paint for three months and then later on buff out any imperfections made? Or it is literally going to scuff everything and I would be better of waiting?

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Are you washing first? What are you using for soap/shampoo? If the cars finish is really bad, add some APC to the wash process to help cut dirt and grime.

 

I see plenty of dirty, neglected cars come through my place and I can still remove the better part of the crusty stuff in one pass and only use one piece of clay. I usually break it up into thirds. I think I've only ever used an entire bar (that was literally tossed in the trash afterwards) only one time.

 

The dirtier the car is, the more risk of grinding the dirt into the surface, so like I mentioned previously, I do understand your question, but the dirtier it is, the more important it is to clean it first.

 

- Darryl

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If the contamination is that bad, I would definitely not wax over that crud. Even a really bad car shouldn't take that much time, although now the cost of the clay is a consideration. But if they have time to wax then there is time to clay. I do not recommend doing anything halfway.

 

So my vote... Yes, you can put wax over an uncorrected finish, no, do not wax over a contaminated finish.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I am using Adams shampoo and a VERY thorough wash. Basically as clean as a car can get from a two bucket wash. I like the All Purpose Cleaner idea, should definitely add some cutting power.

 

From what you are saying though, it sounds like it's better to do the clay regardless just to not make anything worse. Extra swirls are never a good thing!:willy:

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Hey guys I tried searching but couldn't find anything. Is it okay to apply brilliant glaze or/and a wax without claying the paint? I have friends and clients that don't have the time/money for a full paint correction and just want some extra shine and a wax to protect their paint until they can do the full correction.

 

I wouldn't think it would do any harm, and I feel like it would be a good idea to protect the paint until the next full detail.

Luke, The question is, does your paint need clayed?

It probably does but do the baggie test and see, if it does then yes you should clay first.

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Depending on how long it would take them to get the extra money to do the full correction I suggest to just wait. Kinda pointless to clay wax and glaze the whole car and then have to strip it soon after to do the correction. But like everyone else has mentioned I would not add wax or bg to an unclayed surface if the vehicle is in pretty bad shape.

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Guest Gone & Forgotten

If I can't do a job right, I won't do it. That's what brings alot of us to high-end boutique over-the-top product sites like Adam's Polishes. We go the extra mile, no matter the investment of time/money.

 

I'd never do glaze or wax to paint that needed clay'd. If they paint is that bad, why protect it. You're just protecting the damage. Meanwhile, more damage will occur from future neglect.

 

I'd offer a good wash, interior detail, dress the trim/tires, vacuum - but if they don't wanna spring for the clay, detail spray and labor involved (not much) - I'd skip the rest of the process.

 

I just clay'd a car that was pretty bad. Took me half a bar, 1 bottle of DS and 30 minutes., That's $25 in materials and about $25 labor. (I'm not cheap).

 

Now, that half-bar of clay will work fine for my glass, then after that, it's for the riding lawn mower. :)

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The one thing you can do is have the customer feel the paint with a baggie beforehand, and then have them feel it after the claying and waxing. NO comparison, and the end result of having the customer touch the finish may well sell the claying. Plus if you have to clay it again, the next time you clay, it will go much faster, as the first time is when you are doing the heavy cleaning. (unless, of course, they wait a year to come back!) :D I think the claying helps build the shine - smooths out the 'mirror' of the finish. Just my two cents-

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Thanks everyone for your responses. I kind of thought that claying was pretty much necessary.

 

The reason I was curious is that I see so many places that say "Wash and Wax" for like $25 dollars. If they had to clay I figured it would have to be more expensive just because of labor. So my guess is that they are just doing it wrong. :loser:

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Thanks everyone for your responses. I kind of thought that claying was pretty much necessary.

 

The reason I was curious is that I see so many places that say "Wash and Wax" for like $25 dollars. If they had to clay I figured it would have to be more expensive just because of labor. So my guess is that they are just doing it wrong. :loser:

 

Shiny paint is a very subjective thing unfortunately :willy:

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What are you charging people and what services are discussed?

 

If they're expecting a certain level of results then DEFINITELY you need to clay to actually have some benefit from the waxing.

 

If its just a 'wash and wax' type of deal and the end result isn't as important as the fact that it just gets somewhat cleaned then skip the clay.

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