Jump to content
Customer Service 866.965.0400
  • 0

Why is this taking so long? Help!


Brews02ws6
 Share

Question

Well, I thought I was almost done polishing my 2002 white Trans Am. It's garaged, so I've been working a few hours each over the last several weekends. I thought I had good results on my first test section (the front bumper) using the orange pad and polish with the Porter Cable. I ended up switching to blue pad and polish to get a few deeps scratches out and it really made them look better, if not completely removed. Somewhere along the way I moved to the microfiber pad with blue compound and I was seeing good results.

 

I'm not going for perfection here and the car looks great. However, tonight I had the light in a different position to start on the finishing polish and now I see tons of light scratches that I was unable to see before. They're not horrible and very hard to find, but it's really disappointing considering how much work I've done. I used several flashlights to try and locate these areas before moving on. I also have LED lights overhead and a shop light I've moved all around. No idea how I'm just finding all this.

 

Sorry I think I'm just ranting now. How do I achieve more cut? And do you think this is happening because it's the first correction on paint from 2001? I used every combo of heavy and light pressure, with very slow to medium speed movement. The polisher was on 5 most of the time, at least twice per section. I then moved it down to 3 for finishing passes with the blue or orange compounds. There's been no issue with dust forming and the polish is flashing nicely before I wipe it off with double soft towels. I've also washed the pads after each use so the polish doesn't dry on them over night.

 

For reference, I've tried to follow the junkman process, the videos here, or other methods some people outline in this forum. I'm not combining processes, just trying them at different times to see if results changed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

from the heavy correcting compound did you finish it off with a finishing polish and white foam pad? Usually the microfiber pad and heavy correcting compound is not going to leave a perfect finish, its only going to grind down to even out the already heavy scratches you have. After the heavy scratches seem to disappear, then you need to give it a pass with the regular orange correcting compound and orange foam pad. This will again start minimizing your scratches. The final pass would be the finishing polish and a white foam pad. This should then give you near perfect results, if not perfect. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Ok that might help explain it. I did not go back with orange before moving to finishing polish. I thought I read it wasn't necessary...but I don't think my paint is very forgiving. I will try the orange on several areas before moving on tomorrow. Thanks for the feedback!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I sure am. The worst of it looks great. I scraped the nose on some brick entering my garage (don't ask!) and it left lots of grey scuffs. Looking good now, but will still have it painted at some point.

Pics when it's done!

I would highlight on make sure you are finishing with the correcting polish or finishing polish because the compound is for cutting, not finishing. Remember 3-5 pounds pressure in a cross hatch pattern.

 

Try looking at the car with the light at a 45* angle.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

The paint on our cars is pretty hard. Someone from Adams told me once that some cars would need, heavy compound with the blue pad or MF pad and then followed by the orange pad and correction polish. The correction polish and orange pad after the blue pad and heavy compound will get you the results you're looking . The Correction polish finishes down extremely well even on black. So with your white car I think you'd be totally satisfied and wouldn't need the extra step of the white pad and finishing polish. Just my opinion though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Hard paint - takes a lot to correct

RIDS - show up more when you remove the lighter ones

Micro-marring  - you don't want to work backwards.  don't put scratches in while your taking them out. 

 

 

All seem like they could be happening here.

 

work a test section dial in the right combinations and use that as your guide. also you want to be consistent it what pads/product your using.  If you can't remember what you used with what and where take some pictures or journal it.

 

Speaking of pictures they would probably help out to better determine the issue you are having.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

As others have suggested, tape off a 2 ft. x 2 ft. area and perfect that first.  And if you are not getting results, take a video of your process and post that us for us to pick apart...I mean critique!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I had 16 hours into my TBSS, and 20 hours into my friends TBSS. Took me 4 hours on the hood alone to bring it back when I prepped it to be coated.

I also have 12-14 hours into a little Pontiac Solstice and it's still not perfect but it was good enough for it being a daily summer driver car.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...